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Value is in session to pave road in society

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posted on Nov, 30 2007 @ 07:20 PM
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1. If everyone in the U.S. went to college for a masters in something, would they all become apart of the upper class in the real world?

2. If everyone in the U.S. graduated from high school and didnt go to college, would all jobs then have to hire those ppl and train them while giving them pay of that that would make those ppl upper class?

3. If everyone in the U.S. boycotted colleges/universities, what all would happen in the outcome? Would it be good or bad for the ppl of the U.S. as a whole nation?

You see, I think we can raise the value of ppl to the job market by boycotting the debt breeding/money hungery higher learning educational system aspect in the U.S. It should force more of the better of education one would get in college to be installed in the classes of high school nationwide. Agree or disagree? Instead of you all wanting to see the day higher education is free, you all should want higher education dropped down into high schools. Graduates fresh out of high school under what I'm saying would then not get into the debt cycle (unlike many outside of what I'm saying have), no, they'd pass go to collect in the real world. Value of ppl would be quickened rather than gained over a long period of time the ppl could do without.

So anyhow, they'd be all set to stay out of the lower class under what I'm saying. At least the ones who didnt drop out.


[edit on 30-11-2007 by Mabus]




posted on Nov, 30 2007 @ 10:46 PM
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You have some interesting ideas.

I agree that it shouldn't be necessary to have a college degree in order to get a decent job. College develops the mind in important ways, but it doesn't always train people for a specific job. Whether you're a college graduate or a high school graduate, either way your employer has to train you in the company's ways of doing things. Many employers want to see that degree just as proof that a person has the perseverance to get through four years of education. But it does make them pass by some intelligent, talented people who for any number of reasons were not able, or didn't want, to go college.

There are some jobs like those in heating & air conditioning, plumbing, electrician, skilled construction, etc.--the trades-- that pay well (VERY well if you own your own business) but only require a few courses at a community college or an apprenticeship. It's possible to get a good job and become middle class (even college doesn't guarantee you'll be upper class)without going to college, but it's harder.

It's true that if college courses were taught at the high school level then college would be free. IMO that would be difficult to do. College courses are different from high school courses in important ways.While h.s. classes focus on giving information, college is more about learning how to think logically and to develop your own ideas. It usually takes four years of concentrated effort for a bachelor's agree, and two more years for a master's.

To teach college courses in h.s. would mean that high school courses would have to be taught in middle school, and middle school courses in elementary school. I think it's possible to make the curriculum more challenging, and I see no reason why some college courses couldn't be taught in high school. But I'm not sure if it could all be crammed into twelve years of schooling. If it were, you might have more people dropping out when they turned sixteen, and you'd still have a dropout problem. It might be better to fund junior colleges more. I've taught in a community college and there were Pell grants for those students who could not afford tuition (these are grants, not loans) as well as scholarships. It's not impossible to go to college if you really want to go.

You've asked some challenging questions. Thank you.



[edit on 30-11-2007 by Sestias]

[edit on 30-11-2007 by Sestias]

[edit on 30-11-2007 by Sestias]

[edit on 30-11-2007 by Sestias]



posted on Dec, 1 2007 @ 10:01 AM
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Well then let me add...

There would be no cramming if students had options. Like an option to bypass any high school level courses with a standardized test designed to excell the students in areas they already got the upper hand on so they dont have to take every single course put in class sessions to be learned if they pass the test in those areas.

Students should have the capability to work smarter, not harder if they choose. I mean let the student that think working harder is going to get them somewhere work harder. But while doing so let the students that think working smarter is going to get them somewhere work smarter too.

As for the other option: students in high school should be able to take what college courses they need that's apart of what they honestly rather need while in high school to become upon graduation what they desire to become in life in this real world.

In the job world they must be trained with pay anyway. By choice in high schools students shouldnt have to take what they absolutely will not be needing for their career choice. Nope, they should have the option to get to learn what they'll only need. Just have it be of a college level for them.

So all in all to sum this up, students should have the option of whether to take the dropped down college courses they need for what they want to become in high school and students should have the option of whether to take a standardized 'high school course' bypass test so they can be where they need to be in terms of what courses they think they need to learn. It should go all ways because each student is a unique individual capable of choosing the way they will learn best to better themselves for the real world.



[edit on 1-12-2007 by Mabus]

[edit on 1-12-2007 by Mabus]



posted on Dec, 1 2007 @ 11:22 PM
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reply to post by Mabus
 

Your idea of having standardized tests seems excellent. That way, students who already know the material can test out of some high school courses and instead take more advanced ones.

You sound like you're in a hurry to get out into the "real world" and begin working. I'm guessing you're in high school and it doesn't challenge you enough. Correct me if I'm wrong. I understand that many high schools already have programs that allow advanced students to take a few college courses; maybe yours does too.

I think I understand your impatience with subjects you think you won't need in real life. Still, I believe that college gives you benefits beyond career preparation alone. It develops the mind and broadens your experience of the world. These are things that will enrich your life in many, many ways for years to come.

I wish you the best on your path to the future.



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