Digital image stored in single molecule

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posted on Dec, 10 2002 @ 12:43 AM
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An image composed of over 1000 bits of information can be stored in the atoms of a single molecule, US researchers have shown.

Bing Fung and colleagues at the University of Oklahoma found that the 19 hydrogen atoms in a lone liquid crystal molecule can store at least 1024 bits of information. The data are stored in the complex interaction of the protons' magnetic moments.

Fung hopes the technique, dubbed "molecular photography", could one day be used to pack massive amounts of digital information into a tiny space but admits that the process is currently experimental. "It's a very, very first step towards using nuclear spins for molecular information processing," he told New Scientist.

In their experiments, the researchers used a molecule to store a black and white image, 32 pixels square. The image was encoded in binary 1s and 0s that can easily be processed by a computer.


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posted on Dec, 10 2002 @ 01:09 AM
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It seems to me our storage capacity is going to surpass our ability to read it for a time being.


Sincerely,
no signature



posted on Dec, 10 2002 @ 07:14 AM
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Storage capacity, and storage reliability, and storage feasibility are different matters.

What is the reliability of forcing a molecule to retain attributes it may not acquire naturally?

What is the feasibility of acquisition of the data in a timely manner. How does one address a simple molecule in binary code? What is the latency of acquiring data from a molecule?

Interesting concept for the pages of Scientific American, but the idea lacks practicality in application to actual real world data.



posted on Dec, 10 2002 @ 07:32 AM
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Originally posted by Winston Smith
Storage capacity, and storage reliability, and storage feasibility are different matters.

What is the reliability of forcing a molecule to retain attributes it may not acquire naturally?

What is the feasibility of acquisition of the data in a timely manner. How does one address a simple molecule in binary code? What is the latency of acquiring data from a molecule?

Interesting concept for the pages of Scientific American, but the idea lacks practicality in application to actual real world data.


You don't say. I read that as well in the article !!

As far as real world applications, it's only experimental as the article says.



posted on Dec, 10 2002 @ 08:25 AM
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I didn't read the article... no sarcasm was intended.



posted on Dec, 15 2002 @ 07:45 AM
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thankfully practicality, applicability, and potential for commercialisation aren't ~always~ needed for research, otherwise i probably wouldn't have a grant right now. i'm interested in this idea from the 'novel science' aspect. as quantum physics goes its pretty impressive.

- qo.



posted on Dec, 17 2002 @ 07:16 PM
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for the next next generation of perverts, this means more room for porn! yay!



posted on Dec, 18 2002 @ 04:33 PM
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Originally posted by Project_Blazon
for the next next generation of perverts, this means more room for porn! yay!


I can see where hes gonna apply the technology.





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