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Expanding NSA Power Bad, Fourth Amendment Good

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posted on Nov, 23 2007 @ 12:44 PM
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Expanding NSA Power Bad, Fourth Amendment Good


rinf.com

Missing from the debate over expanding NSA authority in the War on Terror is the simple question, beyond our reflexive desire for privacy: why is expanding this authority such a bad idea? We know the Feds have done nasty, un-American things like spy on activists like Martin Luther King, but it comes out in the wash, doesn’t it? Did the Founders, who took pains to enshrine freedom from “unreasonable search and seizure,” without “probable cause,” understand what the Stasi, Hitler, and the KGB
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Nov, 23 2007 @ 12:44 PM
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A very good story here, and a must read for all members here. I'm posting this paragraph from the story because this is the absolute truth and anything Bush or the rest of government tells you is a lie.

Remember, what we are talking about is not the power to spy on terrorists. The government already has that. They can flip the switch immediately if they think anything is going down. They just have to get a warrant within 48 hours. That’s after the fact. Bush lies when he implies the Constitution is outdated because sometimes there’s no time to get a warrant. It shows what he really wants: no one looking over his shoulder whatsoever.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


We are well on our way towards a police state and this is sad. So many have fought and died for this country, and our freedoms, to watch as they systematically disassemble these freedoms is a disgrace.

rinf.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Nov, 23 2007 @ 01:17 PM
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Yeah it's funny how that little factoid got overlooked in the argument for warrant less wiretaps. If you do a search, you'll find that the FISA court has always allowed wiretapping to be started immediately and a warrant issued later as long as they can prove probably cause. You'll also find figures that show the Bush administration started all this crap because they had a record number of wiretaps denied by FISA due to lack of probable cause. The warrantless tapping started once the court started throwing out their applications.



posted on Nov, 23 2007 @ 01:35 PM
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SeattlePI.com
The 11-judge court that authorizes FISA wiretaps has approved at least 18,740 applications for electronic surveillance or physical searches from five presidential administrations since 1979.

The judges modified only two search warrant orders out of the 13,102 applications that were approved over the first 22 years of the court's operation. In 20 of the first 21 annual reports on the court's activities up to 1999, the Justice Department told Congress that "no orders were entered (by the FISA court) which modified or denied the requested authority" submitted by the government.

But since 2001, the judges have modified 179 of the 5,645 requests for court-ordered surveillance by the Bush administration. A total of 173 of those court-ordered "substantive modifications" took place in 2003 and 2004 -- the most recent years for which public records are available.

The judges also rejected or deferred at least six requests for warrants during those two years -- the first outright rejection in the court's history.

Attorney General Alberto Gonzales said last week that Bush authorized NSA surveillance of overseas communications by U.S.-based terror suspects because the FISA court's approval process was too cumbersome.



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