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Beginning of original Loose Change, remote controlled Boeng 720

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posted on Nov, 23 2007 @ 07:19 AM
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In the original Loose Change you see a clip in the beginning about a Nasa test flight of a Boeng 720 in 1984 which they fly remote controlled for like 15 hours before crashing it for fuel research. I am wondering why they didn't discuss the possibility that the planes on 9/11 could have been remote controlled? They seem to just move on in the documentary and leave it hanging in the air.

I put this clip together on YouTube just to get peoples opinion on the matter - www.youtube.com...

[edit on 23-11-2007 by somethingaintright]




posted on Nov, 23 2007 @ 10:40 AM
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Sounds like a question for the Loose Change Crew. All anyone else can do is speculate.

I remember seeing the footage. They may have included it as a statement that the technology existed to fly a commercial plane by remote control. They're not making the statement that the 911 flights were remotely controlled, they can't. Statements like that require some proof.

I recently watched the Loose Change Final Cut. In the newest version they stay completely away from the mechanics of the event. They're not trying to explain how anything was done. Their goal is to establish that there was a cover up of what really happened that day. It's a much safer tactic.



posted on Nov, 23 2007 @ 03:30 PM
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Considering the intensive maintenance performed by the airlines and the
skill of the mechanics, all must be FAA certified, rather doubtful anyone
could rig up up one of their planes, much less 2. Planes are subject
to routine checks at specific intervals. Crew members also have a
maintenance line to call in problems - it was such a line that Betty Ong
called in reporting hijack. Cant see one of their mechanics saying "hey
whats this box doing here? Never seen it before"



posted on Nov, 23 2007 @ 04:51 PM
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reply to post by thedman
 


'Extra boxes' are not required to remotely fly a 757...


A computerized, fully integrated flight management system (FMS) provides for automatic guidance and control of the airplane from immediately after takeoff to final approach and landing. Linking together digital processors controlling navigation, guidance and engine thrust, the FMS assures that the aircraft flies the most efficient route and flight profile for reduced fuel consumption, flight time and crew workload.

Source


With the Pegasus FMC, operators can choose optional software that enables elements of the future air navigation system (FANS). FANS functions provide operators with the ability to use advanced systems, such as global positioning system (GPS) sensors and satellite communications (SATCOM), to take full advantage of new communication, navigation and air traffic management systems for more efficient routing and decreased trans-oceanic traffic separation.


If the planes were set up with back-door access to the computers it wouldn't be that hard to control the plane from an external computer, taking control of the on-board computer wirelessly using the Telnet protocol, and software such as LanDesk (to change the actual flight configurations on the planes computer). Or even using GPS, and a homing beacon as used by laser guided weapons. Remember the light that was seen on the towers before impact?



posted on Nov, 24 2007 @ 02:00 PM
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reply to post by thedman
 


Its a simple 1 to 2 thousand dollar gyrochip that goes into the flight deck software.
There would be no pods visible from outside the plane, and the plane would have missile like control.
Might not have even been "controlled" from outside the plane, in the sense that coordinates or a preprogrammed route, with way points, start , and end point could have been inputted from in or outside the plane.



posted on Nov, 25 2007 @ 11:33 AM
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Originally posted by ANOK'Extra boxes' are not required to remotely fly a 757...


If you so called 9/11-internet investigators had been working for a private company or even the police you had been fired right away for poor investigation.


The B757/67 is NOT fly by wire, it's hydromechanical operated, and
ALL the automatics can be disconnected by:

Autopilot: Push one button and it's off.

Autothrottle: Flip one switch and it's gone.

One would need loads of black boxes and hydraulics to operate a none FBW-Boeing remotely.

I dunno why you 9/11 Truthers lie so goddamd much when claiming that you're searching for the truth.

There's an ongoing thread about this on www.pprune.org... , a professional pilots forum.
If any of you wants the truth about Boeings, feel free to post on this thread, just stay away from mud-slinging and name-calling.



Kamikaze

[edit on 25-11-2007 by Kamikaze905]



posted on Nov, 25 2007 @ 12:16 PM
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Originally posted by Kamikaze905
I dunno why you 9/11 Truthers lie so goddamd much when claiming that you're searching for the truth.


You might be interested to know that it's only a lie if you know the truth. Most of us are simply unaware and you shouldn't be so rude about it. We all have actual lives and professions - researching 9/11 is a side thing for most of us.

And since most of us are just regular joes w/no special budgets or anything else I think we've done pretty good.

Consider this: even the govt who has 1000% more info than us gets even basic details wrong.

Cut us some slack.



posted on Nov, 25 2007 @ 03:59 PM
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Originally posted by Kamikaze905

Originally posted by ANOK'Extra boxes' are not required to remotely fly a 757...


If you so called 9/11-internet investigators had been working for a private company or even the police you had been fired right away for poor investigation.


Wow that thread really cleared it up...


They are talking about REMOTE CONTROL. That's not what I'm talking about...


A computerized, fully integrated flight management system (FMS) provides for automatic guidance and control of the airplane from immediately after takeoff to final approach and landing. Linking together digital processors controlling navigation, guidance and engine thrust, the FMS assures that the aircraft flies the most efficient route and flight profile for reduced fuel consumption, flight time and crew workload.

Source

If the planes were set up with backdoor access to the computers it wouldn't be that hard to control the plane from an external computer, taking control of the on-board computer wirelessly using the Telnet protocol, and software such as LanDesk (to change the actual flight configurations on the planes computer). Or even using GPS, and a homing beacon as used by laser guided weapons. Remember the light that was seen on the towers before impact? Once the coordinates are put into the computer it will fly itself (autopilot), no different than doing it in the cockpit. No one sitting on the ground with a joystick controlling the plane...

I'm not saying this IS what happened, but it IS a possibility that fits and I just put out for discussion.



posted on Nov, 25 2007 @ 09:26 PM
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Well Anok, if you had any knowledge about Boeing systems you would know that taking control over a Boeing that way is impossible.
First of all, THE B767/75 IS NOT FLY BY WIRE, it doesn't have a central onboard computer, and certainly not any interface that can allow someone to communicate with any parts of the aircraft systems in flight.

The FMS is a computer separated from the rest of the systems, all it does is when programmed is giving roll, elevator and speed-input to the atopilot, autothrottle and flight director.
On approach it also gives rudder input for sidewind-correction and rollout guidance.
Diconnecting the autopilot and autothrottle will ensure that the FMC has no
influence on any flight control surface or the engines.

So, forget about the backdoor because there's no way to comunicate with any of the aircraft systems without plug in to it on the ground.

BTW, the engines can communicate with the ground while in flight, but that's a one way communication aircraft to ground.



posted on Nov, 25 2007 @ 10:49 PM
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Originally posted by Kamikaze905
The B757/67 is NOT fly by wire, it's hydromechanical operated, and
ALL the automatics can be disconnected by:

Autopilot: Push one button and it's off.

Autothrottle: Flip one switch and it's gone.

One would need loads of black boxes and hydraulics to operate a none FBW-Boeing remotely.


Question:

Has anyone supplied irrefutable proof that they were the flights that they said they were? Just saying.



posted on Nov, 25 2007 @ 11:02 PM
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Even if they weren't the exact flights they said, the two in New York certainly looked to be 767s, and the first fly by wire Boeing built was the 777. So the TYPE of plane used certainly appeared to be the same as they said they were.



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