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ionized particle accelerator for aircrafts

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posted on Nov, 21 2007 @ 01:25 AM
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i was thinking that maybe someday we could develop a technology to manipulate the surrounding air by ionizing these air particles into negatively charged ions. then these negative charged air particles will then be accelerated at very high speed by a positively charged plate at high voltage which then will give a thrust to the aircraft. but having these in mind we should take in considerations of the mass as this principles here lies in the newton third law of motion that state that for every action there is a reaction to it, F = ma.
the speed has been taken care of by accelerating the particles which is estimated to be about 70% the speed of light. the mass can be achieve by compressing the air into great density into a specific chamber where it is to be ionized. so if the force is to be calculated and lets say a given mass = 1kg the force, F = 1 x 70% x (3.0x10^8) = 210000000N and this is if there is no loss in energy.

if this technology is possible then in near future there is absolutely no worries on limited fuel as air particles are abundant to be ionized and furthermore it is a clean energy.

Anyway its worth a thought
Any opinions?




posted on Nov, 21 2007 @ 02:30 AM
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I am not sure of the specifics of the issue, but considering that ion engines so far are used in space and go really slow for acceleration it might not be great. However such a system as you propose may be possible, I am not sure. It would take a huge amount of energy first though, nd I think you would need a magnetic field too, since otherwise the ions you create would go straight back to the plates. This introduces the problem of how large the magnetic field is though.

Like I said first though, I'm not sure of the specifics.



posted on Nov, 21 2007 @ 03:57 AM
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A few thoughts.


- I believe ion drives are limited in space because they are relying solely on momentum reaction of the ions they release. A drive in air may be able to move Nitrogen and oxygen molecules - increasing propulsion.

- It is more efficient to accelerate a large mass of air by a smaller amount than a small volume of air by a large amount. If you are taking of approaching 0.7 SoL - then you will have truly horrific propulsive efficiencies.

- Ionising air particles to make them react to a magnetic field is also an issue, as is keeping the drag of any arrangement minimal.

- the future probably lies in electromagnetic manipulation of gravity itself.



posted on Nov, 22 2007 @ 08:33 AM
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reply to post by jeremywhd
 


Jeremy checkout www.earthfiles.com... or my link called Black Budget ..
They discuss a B2 using electro-gravatic propulsion. Another related concept involves plasma sheath surrounding the aricraft. This offers many potential benefits ..actually this is a very very highly researched area right now

Check out www.spacedaily.com...



posted on Nov, 22 2007 @ 09:38 AM
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Originally posted by BlackProjects
They discuss a B2 using electro-gravatic propulsion. Another related concept involves plasma sheath surrounding the aricraft. This offers many potential benefits ..actually this is a very very highly researched area right now


I'm quite sure that if that actually exists, its a form of boundary layer control for reduced drag, and is not in itself a form of propulsion.


In particular, it would enable the B2 to fly much faster without the associated transonic shock-induced boundary layer separation.



posted on Nov, 22 2007 @ 04:29 PM
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Yes, you are right it is the boundary layer that is really being investigated heavily now. Also another characteristic is plasma stealth. The plasma field actually absorbs RF(ala radar) and makes even nonstealth aircraft stealthy....the russians claim they have this now.



posted on Nov, 22 2007 @ 09:29 PM
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No. These drives work in space due to the minute forces involved. They would drop out of the sky in our atmosphere. You need something with a great deal of thrust and these are not designed for it.



posted on Nov, 23 2007 @ 06:56 AM
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You're right...the ion propulsion is obviously for space(maybe to Mars) thing. Not sure why I hoped on the plasma stealth soapbox I guess I have just been thinking about that a lot



posted on Nov, 23 2007 @ 07:29 AM
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Originally posted by SteveR
No. These drives work in space due to the minute forces involved. They would drop out of the sky in our atmosphere. You need something with a great deal of thrust and these are not designed for it.


Depends if you are thinking of a normal design of one or one which is made for the atmosphere, ie it could use intake air and propel the craft with that, like how jet engines work now, only using electromagnetic fields instead of burning fuel to accelerate the air. Of course, you would need a big power source though which would be a problem.



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