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Living Green Algae on Mars!!! With Pics!!

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posted on Mar, 4 2004 @ 10:36 AM
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Originally posted by ShadowHasNoSource
They are prepping the collective mind.


So it seems 'you' are far smarter and learned than any of 'us' to know all of this.

Perhaps you could inform us of the reasons and proof for all this instead of posting rambling bs such as that?




posted on Mar, 4 2004 @ 05:09 PM
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Originally posted by Kano

Originally posted by ShadowHasNoSource
They are prepping the collective mind.


So it seems 'you' are far smarter and learned than any of 'us' to know all of this.

Perhaps you could inform us of the reasons and proof for all this instead of posting rambling bs such as that?



Sure. Since there is adequate proof for any conspiracy let me pull that right out of my....ewww.

You people amaze me. You believe anything your government and media tells you without asking a question but when it comes to something outside our slave reality you turn inquisitive.

Well, for all those seeking proof of something other than the stupidity you see everyday you won't find it. You will only find circumstantial evidence. So as Ripley would say, Believe it or not.

And no, I don't think nor claim I'm smarter than anyone else. I'm just giving my view as everyone else here does. I'm not selling magic elixor or snake oil.

I'll repeat it again since I think it's quite relevant. There is no proof of any of these conspiracies. There is only circumstantial evidence and logical deduction. Those looking for proof won't find it. But it's a good waste of time.

Kano, just ignore me if it bothers you. I'm not trying to convert anyone to my new cult. However, if you'd like to join just send me $50,000 and I'll send your starter kit Priority Mail.



posted on Mar, 4 2004 @ 05:19 PM
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Originally posted by Stefan



Well Yoda , I ask you again than if it is olivine why is it clearly to see from above and not on the ground?


Hmmm...don't recall you ever asking, but tell me, what difference would it make ???



posted on Mar, 4 2004 @ 06:36 PM
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whoa !
The atmosphere of mars would not allow green mold or lichen or any plant life to still be that color
its just to cold and not enough other factors to allow that to be anything other than a mineral deposit



posted on Mar, 5 2004 @ 01:20 AM
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So in short, no you don't have any justification for such claims ShadowHasNoSource?



posted on Apr, 24 2004 @ 12:17 AM
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Originally posted by Kano

Originally posted by ShadowHasNoSource
They are prepping the collective mind.


So it seems 'you' are far smarter and learned than any of 'us' to know all of this.

Perhaps you could inform us of the reasons and proof for all this instead of posting rambling bs such as that?



Originally posted by Kano
So in short, no you don't have any justification for such claims ShadowHasNoSource?



Give me the resources of the US government and I could prove it to you. Unless you have another way to get ahold of a particle accelerator, build an antenna like haarp, put some satellites in orbit, have a work unit of a 100 or so that can build things on call, access to large quantities of exotic materials, and things of this nature.



posted on Apr, 26 2004 @ 06:45 PM
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@THENEO
... Besides we are looking for oxygen since we are not plants.

But plants make the oxygen we breathe.

@smokenmirrors
Correct me if I'm wrong, but the Bible never specifies what planet life begins on. I don't think it limits it to only one 'celestial body' either.

[Edited on 26-4-2004 by xenophanes85]



posted on Mar, 19 2006 @ 12:37 AM
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Originally posted by browha
a plan discussed briefly to use large mirrors to reflect more sunlight onto the poles and thus melt the ice..



Wouldn't light diffusion prevent that from working? There's a great distance involved afterall.



posted on Mar, 19 2006 @ 12:15 PM
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There is a bigger problem working here for plant life on the surface then enough atmosphere. Mars has no magnetic field to speak of, it has no protection against Solar radiation and Gamma rays. No plant life or other life could possibly survive in those conditions.

Which makes terraforming a moot idea without a magnetic field to keep out deadly radiation.



posted on Mar, 20 2006 @ 08:19 PM
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But it used to have a magnetic field (they think), so maybe it did once have life. Maybe the radiation killed it. Maybe something adapted to the radiation (not really possible with gamma rays. I can't remember the last tree i saw with a 2inch thick lead bark). Maybe it adapted to live underneath the surface - possible? Maybe the organisms aquire energy from the heat caused on the surface?

The one arguement that will hinder extra terrestrial life on Mars will be 'man put it there.' It's a good arguement but could anything on Earth survive there? That'd be a good test.



posted on Mar, 20 2006 @ 08:29 PM
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Originally posted by intelgurl

Doesn't plant life take in carbon dioxide and expel oxygen?


Some primitive forms of Algae have a metabolic switch that causes the algae to stop producing oxygen and release hydrogen instead. They pretty much turn off photosynthesis as we know it.

I think its thought to be a throw back to early plant life on earth or something.

link



posted on Mar, 20 2006 @ 08:32 PM
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Pretty hard to get accurate colors from Mars. I suspect the green might be an artifact of a combination of yellow in the dust and those damned blueberries that are lying around everywhere. So it probably really looks more like this:



I didn't see where the rover shot any pictures of algea. Lots of blueberries, though.



posted on Mar, 20 2006 @ 08:36 PM
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Originally posted by Shakeyjc
But it used to have a magnetic field (they think), so maybe it did once have life. Maybe the radiation killed it. Maybe something adapted to the radiation (not really possible with gamma rays. I can't remember the last tree i saw with a 2inch thick lead bark). Maybe it adapted to live underneath the surface - possible? Maybe the organisms aquire energy from the heat caused on the surface?



I don't discount that life once existed on Mars, On the contrary I think it is pretty likely possibly 1 billion years ago. But any life (plant or otherwise) would have long been extinguished from the sterilized surface.

Could life exist just below the surface? Absolutely, but to confirm this will take boots on the ground and nothing less.


apc

posted on Mar, 21 2006 @ 02:00 PM
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On the subject of Mars lacking a magnetosphere...

What if it were possible for green goo to grow in the areas that do have a magnetic field? Mars may not have a structured magnetosphere, but it does have patchy fields eminating from the surface. Perhaps one of these would offer sufficient protection?



posted on Mar, 21 2006 @ 02:10 PM
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Doesn't matter if its green pink or purple...

Seasonal changes show up for various areas of the planet (aside from weather related ones)...

we do see methane there.
So the case is strong... but life will probably not work the same way...
I suspect that sulpher or ammonia or perhaps silicone might be the backbone for life on mars...

Titan would have methane based life

Venus would have ? based life...
and so forth...

debating whether it is truly green doesn't make much sense
debating whether it is truly expanding in a warm season, and shrinking in a cold one might result in more conclusions...



posted on Mar, 23 2006 @ 02:02 AM
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Why are people still discussing (fantasising for the most part..) about this? NASA said back in 2000 that this is minerals, minerals that proves that Mars has been cold and dry through most of it's life time, at least.



posted on Mar, 23 2006 @ 10:21 PM
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This photo was in the NASA news recently, and it clearly stated that the green color was a false color of the analysis processes used. Not something green and growing. Sorry, no planets other than ours seem to have big batches of green and growing life forms.



posted on Mar, 24 2006 @ 01:17 PM
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Originally posted by TheHorseChestnut
There is a bigger problem working here for plant life on the surface then enough atmosphere. Mars has no magnetic field to speak of, it has no protection against Solar radiation and Gamma rays. No plant life or other life could possibly survive in those conditions.


Well 'other life' is the type of thing we really have no idea about but here is a clue to what IS possible with just your garden variety earth life.


In 1991, as Apollo 12 Commander Pete Conrad reviewed the transcripts of his conversations relayed from the moon back to Earth, the significance of the only known microbial survivor of harsh interplanetary travel struck him as profound:
"I always thought the most significant thing that we ever found on the whole...Moon was that little bacteria who came back and lived and nobody ever said [anything] about it."

The 50-100 organisms survived launch, space vacuum, 3 years of radiation exposure, deep-freeze at an average temperature of only 20 degrees above absolute zero, and no nutrient, water or energy source. (
How this remarkable feat was accomplished only by Strep. bacteria remains speculative, but it does recall that even our present Earth does not always look as environmentally friendly as it might have 4 billion years ago when bacteria first appeared on this planet.
The thin ozone layer that currently shields intense solar radiation was largely unformed. Bacteria, originating under global conditions very different from our present day, can be thought to be space travelers already: over time the generational records of microbes have sampled swings in environment here on earth that rival the differences between today's Earth and some of the more hospitable planetary outposts. The growing list of space-hardiness conditions include:

Vacuum conditions, with bacteria taken down to near zero pressure and temperature, provided suitable care is exercised in the experimental conditions.
Pressure, with viable bacteria after exposure to pressures as high as 10 tonnes per square centimeter (71 tons/sq-in). Colonies of anaerobic bacteria have recently been recovered from depths of 7 km (4.2 mi) or more in the Earth's crust.
Heat. Archaebacteria that can withstand extreme heat have been found thriving in deep-sea hydrothermal vents and in oil reservoirs a mile underground.
Radiation, including viable bacteria recovered from the interior of an operating nuclear reactor. In comparison to space, each square meter on Earth is protected by about 10 tons of shielding atmosphere.
Long preservation, including bacteria revived and cultured after some 25 million years of encapsulation in the guts of a resin-trapped bee

Earth microbes on the moon.



Which makes terraforming a moot idea without a magnetic field to keep out deadly radiation.


Well we know that low doses( and low dose rate- which is a not very well defined anyways) of radiation actually have beneficial results for the human immune system.


Low-dose, low-dose-rate, radiation has been proven to enhance biological responses that are at all degraded. This is especially true for the immune system, for enzymatic repair of DNA damage, for physiological functions of cells and tissues, and apoptotic removal of damaged cells. These functions are shown to enhance biological capability and health. The effects of these enhancements include prevention and removal of cancers and other diseases.
Such capabilities have succeeded in eliminating some cancers, and other diseases.
Radiation protection policy fails to consider such valid data. It relies on data that is poor, and therefore sufficiently ambiguous to enable claims that “the linear model is not precluded;” and on data and analyses that are misrepresented and manipulated, thereby falsifying the science research and reporting. Scientific misconduct investigations are warranted for some results promulgated by radiation protection-funded scientists, including review committee participants.

www.oism.org...



The biological rationale for the LNT Hypothesis is that a single ionizing particle can cause DNA damage leading to cancer. However, the human body experiences about 15,000 such impacts per second, or more than a billion per day, due to natural causes. Moreover, a million DNA nucleotides in each cell are damaged daily by normal metabolism and body heat.

www.oism.org...


This topic could do with a great deal of research and i believe it is unwise to pretend that even the human body could not be adapted ( naturally or otherwise since it's never had to put up with quite that as far as i know) to survive and thrive in/on strange places/planets.

What sort of damage a native species might evolve to cope with is any one's guess but i for one do not use the word 'impossible' any longer.

Stellar


[edit on 24-3-2006 by StellarX]



posted on Mar, 24 2006 @ 01:54 PM
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Originally posted by Raabjorn
Why are people still discussing (fantasising for the most part..) about this? NASA said back in 2000 that this is minerals, minerals that proves that Mars has been cold and dry through most of it's life time, at least.


Well i have some of their scientist saying other things:


To operate the Mössbauer, Spirit deploys her arm and the device, pressing the flat, contact plate directly against the chosen patch of soil. "Each mineral has its own distinctive Mössbauer pattern, like a fingerprint," explained the lead scientist for this instrument, Goestar Klingelhoefer, of Johannes Gutenberg University, in Mainz, Germany. When the data is returned to Earth, the measurements are displayed in graphs as peaks, with the most abundant mineral boasting the tallest peak.

One unexpected finding from Spirit's Mössbauer measurements was its detection of a considerable amount of olivine in the soil, a silicate mineral that is made up of silicon, oxygen, iron, magnesium. In fact, there was more olivine registering than any other single material. "It is the kind of mineral that one finds in igneous rocks, volcanic rocks, lava, and basalt," Squyres explained. Although olivine actually forms in a number of different rocks, it is, for the most part, a primary igneous mineral. "It is not something that you form as a result of lots of chemical weathering," he pointed out.

"We were surprised about finding olivine in the soil, because we expected weathering material like iron oxides and we haven't seen this yet," Klingelhoefer told The Planetary Society later. " We expected to see a little bit of olivine, which is usually around from the rocks, but this amount was a little bit of a surprise."

www.planetary.org...


So if it turns out that it really is olivine then where does it come from since it would not stand the weathering ( those dust storms are said to whip up quite the storm) for 'many millions of years'. Is the planet really geologically inactive then, as they said till not long ago?


"The Mars we thought we knew was not the real Mars," says Ken Edgett, a geologist with Malin Space Science Systems of San Diego, California, which built the orbiter's cameras. "I'm personally surprised."
His team, led by Massachusetts Institute of Technology geologist Maria Zuber, measured the plains of northern Mars and found them to be extraordinarily flat.

"It's as if from L.A. to Washington it is so flat that there is only a deviation of 10 meters (32.8 feet)," he said. "That is about as flat as can be."
Such data could provide important evidence that the northern plains in at least some part of Mars' past were in fact oceans. The ocean theory remains controversial, given that water on the surface of Mars today would dissipate immediately into the thin atmosphere.

Smiths team also found vivid detail of the strangely contoured quality of the martian surface, with its highlands in the south sloping dramatically to the plains below.
He noted that the Utopia basin in the northern plains -- barely visible to scientists until recently -- reveals strange cracks that could be due to faulting, but also resemble fissures found on Jupiter's frozen moon Europa.
Based on gravity data, the martian basin likely was once an astonishing 7.45 miles (12 kilometers) deep, but was somehow filled in over the centuries.

Mars Weather It's Stranger Than You Thought


I guess it may be not-so-inactive after all?



WASHINGTON -- Researchers using NASA's Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft announced Thursday that they found puzzling signs of water seeping into what appear to be young, freshly-cut gullies and gaps in the Martian surface.
The startling discovery of recently-formed, weeping layers of rock and sediment has planetary experts scratching their heads.

The wet spots show up in more than 120 locations on Mars and in the coldest places on the planet, said Michael Malin of Malin Space Science Systems in San Diego, California, which built the spacecraft's camera.

And that presents a "perplexing problem," he said, because logic says that Mars sub-zero temperatures and thin atmosphere should have kept those wet spots from ever forming.

The wet spots, which turn up in 200 to 250 different images from the Global Surveyor spacecraft, "could be a few million years old but we cannot rule out that some of them are so recent as to have formed yesterday," Malin said.

www.space.com...


Possibly yesterday? Well that is kinda surprising ,right?

I could go on for a few pages but i think your probably getting the idea. Either these guys don't really know much about Mars ( or what coulda/woulda/shoulda happened in the past) or their lies are so numerous that they can't coordinate them properly. I am going with lying since they are after not called NASA( Never a straight answer) for nothing .

Stellar



[edit on 24-3-2006 by StellarX]



posted on Mar, 24 2006 @ 02:14 PM
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Originally posted by browha
The martian atmosphere is simply just too thin to sustain plant life, you would need water, O2, CO2, potassium compounds, nitrates, etc, to sustain plant life...
At night it'd respire, so yes, O2 would be used up.


That is what you would require to sustain plant life as we know it. Are we back to such basic arguments that i must point out how diverse life on just this planet is? A thin atmosphere is not going to prevent plant life anyways and we know that plants can get their water from below the surface. Scientist are now seemingly agreeing that Mars has water below the surface which might or might not be frozen. The evidence of olivine found on the surface also indicates volcanic or other geological activity which means the rest of the compounds might not be all that scarce.

If your going to note objections to plant or other life on Mars you should at least suggest why beside just making the same old assumptions.

Stellar

[edit on 24-3-2006 by StellarX]




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