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60 minutes piece on Evidence of Injustice

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posted on Nov, 19 2007 @ 01:13 AM
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60 minutes piece on Evidence of Injustice


www.cbsnews.com

"It was sort of one of those moments that stops you completely still," Hughes says. "You know, my client's saying, 'Not only did I kill two people, but these other folks didn't have anything to do with it. The state's case is a lie. It's a fabrication.'"

Asked if he tried to get Cashwell to tell that to the authorities, Hughes says, "No."

Because?

"I'm his lawyer," Hughes says. "It wasn't in his interest to tell, to have that known at all."

"Because he could have been facing the death penalty?" Kroft asks.

"He was facing the death penalty. It wasn't theoretical," Hughes says.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Nov, 19 2007 @ 01:13 AM
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How does attorney-client privledge help society as a whole. Here is an example of a travesty of justice that has ruined a mans life and family. Where does common sense enter the equation?

Can someone explain to me why law is written this way?

www.cbsnews.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Nov, 19 2007 @ 02:41 AM
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This is something that has been on my mind for a while. An attorney must know all the evidence presented against their client, and all information the client hasn't disclosed. One of the very first questions an attorney must ask their client is if they committed the crime, and then they try to work around that.

This secrecy is here so that no one can take advantage of the attorney, if he were to be fired/replaced as the defendant's attorney. The attorney also cannot reveal any of this information to the courts after they are fired, and cannot help the prosecuting team.

Now if there were no laws protecting the secrecy, disgruntled fired attorneys could have the opportunity to make up a lie and claim their clients admitted to the crime, even if their client did not.



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