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Explanation of interference (?) needed

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posted on Nov, 17 2007 @ 04:44 PM
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I've been wondering for a long time how could a radio broadcast be heard from the loudspeakers of a stereo record player (NOT combined with a radio or any other such device).

It happened in the 1970s, in a private household.
The family to which this happened had been listening to music from records, so the radio, which was nearby but not connected in any way to the record player, was turned off. After the last record, strange muffled voices were heard coming from one of the loudspeakers. It turned out to be a foreign radio broadcast.

In disbelief, they checked whether the radio was really off - which, of course, it was. (And it wouldn't have been tuned to some "outlandish" station anyway.)

The "broadcast" - a news bulletin or something, by the sound of it (they didn't understand the language, but it definitely WAS a radio programme) - lasted only a few seconds, and then it was gone.

It never happened again (not to them, anyway).

One would think of an interference, of course - but how?

Any ideas, anyone?




posted on Nov, 17 2007 @ 04:58 PM
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I don't know how it could happen but I can relate a similar experience.

A friend an I were parked in a car late at night in a small town near an old airport.

We were listening to the radio when it suddenly got loud and a really low, slow sound came from the speakers, it was a very freaky sound, like you would expect a monster to make, really slowly drawn out sounds that were unrecongnizable to our language, almost as if the sound was moving through water.

We changed the radio station but the sound prevailed, it over rode all the stations we could access. I don't remember if the sound was still there after we turned the radio off, I just remember we were so freaked out we left immediately and never mentioned it again.

It left me with a really creepy feeling.



posted on Nov, 17 2007 @ 05:21 PM
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Sometimes by a total fluke, natural objects might resonate at the particular frequency of some radio broadcast. There are reports of this sort of thing, although it is quite rare, and it is just like you describe, where you hear sounds coming from something that shouldn't ordinarily be making the sound. I can't remember the name of this, but it is a phenomenon known to science.



posted on Nov, 17 2007 @ 05:57 PM
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Radio transmissions are very easy to create/receive.

Any wire on an electrical apparatus can function as an antenna to a specific frequency, related to the length of the wire, so it is not that strange that a turned off radio could detect some radio transmission, the power source on a radio is mostly to amplify the radio signal.

Also, if a radio wave is reflected on a non-flat surface or on series of objects (like a metal bridge, for example), that could change the frequency of the radio signal because of the interference between the original wave and the reflected waves.

But I am not an expert on this subject.



posted on Nov, 18 2007 @ 08:55 AM
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THANK YOU, all of you.
Very interesting replies (and experiences)!

If another related question pops into my head, I'll be sure to come back. ; )





[edit on 18-11-2007 by Vanitas]



posted on Nov, 18 2007 @ 09:01 AM
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Originally posted by ArMaP
so it is not that strange that a turned off radio could detect some radio transmission, the power source on a radio is mostly to amplify the radio signal.


Yes, but this was not the radio "speaking" - it came from the loudspeakers of a RECORD PLAYER, not connected t the radio. ; )

But, anyway, I understand what you're saying.





[edit on 18-11-2007 by Vanitas]



posted on Nov, 18 2007 @ 09:05 AM
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Originally posted by DragonsDemesne
Sometimes by a total fluke, natural objects might resonate at the particular frequency of some radio broadcast. There are reports of this sort of thing, although it is quite rare, and it is just like you describe, where you hear sounds coming from something that shouldn't ordinarily be making the sound. I can't remember the name of this, but it is a phenomenon known to science.


Yes, I think it was one of those "flukes". ; )

My father, while in the navy, once caught a radio transmission or something by the rim of his GLASS!
(I mean a glass of an ordinary potable liquid that he was holding in his hand... And he had witnesses.)



posted on Nov, 18 2007 @ 09:07 AM
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Originally posted by interestedalways
I don't know how it could happen but I can relate a similar experience.
A friend an I were parked in a car late at night in a small town near an old airport.


Very interesting!

My first thought would have been Sun spots (but then, they always get blamed for everything... ; )) or some other space weather-related activity.

Then again, being so near an airport...

Anyway, a fascinating experience.



posted on Nov, 18 2007 @ 09:18 AM
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I have experienced the same kind of behavior in a way. I have a guitar tube amp head(Laney) and a 4x12" cab I play guitar through. On a couple of occassions After the amp was powered off and disconected from the cab a faint fly like buzzing of broadcast could barely be heard coming from the unconnected cab. Also once when there was a loose connection from my guitars pickups wiring I was able to pick up a very strong AM signal on the same amp.



posted on Nov, 18 2007 @ 09:45 AM
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When I lived with my parents in the 70's I vaguely remember my Dad's HiFi equipment picking up interference from the radio transmissions of passing taxis. In that period taxi companies over here were broadcasting at the bottom end of the public FM/VHF spectrum, 88-89 MHz and the taxi transmissions were powerful enough to interfere with amplifiers/loudspeakers irrespective of whether a radio tuner was part of your HiFi set up.

Although that doesn't really explain the foreign language broadcast ... or maybe it does. Depends which language the taxi driver was conversing in !

Othe possibility might be a nearby radio ham or CB radio user ? Both were really popular in the 70's too.



posted on Nov, 19 2007 @ 02:10 AM
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its called a soliton
en.wikipedia.org...

and there fun,perfect waves,if your lucky maybe your laughter will form one and it will traverse round the world!

failing that it could also have been
www.teslatech.info...

some form of scalar wave.

[edit on 19-11-2007 by welivefortheson]



posted on Nov, 19 2007 @ 02:58 AM
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It's quite simple and not in any way "spooky".

Speakers are essentially magnets. Your hi-fi will receive radio waves, turn them into an electrical signal, which will then in turn be passed round a magnet in the speaker, causing the sound to come out due to the vibrations in the air being produced by the movement of the speaker cone. The movements vary depending on the variations in the electrical signal, which in turn are varied depending on the variations in the radio signal.

If the magnet in the speaker was a permanent magnet, as opposed to an electro-magnet, then it would still work even if powered off. The wire at the back of the speaker probably picked up the transmission and caused the magnet to produce vibrations in the cone, leading to the sound heard. As stated above, any metallic object can be used as an antennae.

EDIT: To add: An electrical current will be generated either by moving a metal object through a magnetic field, or vice versa. As a radio signal is a magnetic field, it would have produced a current in the speaker wire with corresponding oscillations to the radio signal, leading to the speaker in the cone producing the sound.

As for the foreign broadcast, radio waves can and do travel around the world. either by bouncing off the Ionosphere, or being the right frequency to travel great distances. It isn't that strange an occurrence to behold, I'm afraid.

Someone above mentioned that they could hear taxis on their own speakers at home. I had something similar with a set of PC speakers I had a few years back. Difference was, i could hear Police transmissions on mine!

Seeing as I lived in a busy city centre, this could be interesting and rather annoying at the same time.

Trying to play Half Life 2 with PC Plod giving you a running commentary on the latest Chav related incident is a bit off putting!

[edit on 19/11/07 by stumason]



posted on Nov, 19 2007 @ 03:53 PM
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Originally posted by Vanitas

My father, while in the navy, once caught a radio transmission or something by the rim of his GLASS!
(I mean a glass of an ordinary potable liquid that he was holding in his hand... And he had witnesses.)


Yeah, I've heard of transmissions being picked up by stuff like pipes or bathroom fixtures or that sort of thing, too. I've never experienced it, though.



posted on Dec, 3 2007 @ 11:41 PM
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Thank you to all who have posted since I last visited this thread.
Very interesting and helpful replies!
I may be revisiting them soon, so... see you soon.



posted on Dec, 3 2007 @ 11:42 PM
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and there fun,perfect waves,if your lucky maybe your laughter will form one and it will traverse round the world!


Ah - there's a nice thought if there ever was one!



posted on Dec, 3 2007 @ 11:44 PM
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Originally posted by Niall197



Well, there definitely were no taxis around - I know that much.
But a sneaky neighbour radio-ham... who knows? ; )



posted on Dec, 3 2007 @ 11:52 PM
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reply to post by Vanitas
 


I had something similar happen about 10 years ago. I was playing my guitar and took a break to go to the bathroom, leaving my amplifier on. When I came back in my room I heard faint voices coming from the amp speaker. After listening for a while I realized it was picking up the audio signal from whatever channel the satellite receiver in the living room was tuned to. Very strange indeed.



posted on Dec, 4 2007 @ 05:18 AM
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Originally posted by VType
I have experienced the same kind of behavior in a way. I have a guitar tube amp head(Laney) and a 4x12" cab I play guitar through. On a couple of occassions After the amp was powered off and disconected from the cab a faint fly like buzzing of broadcast could barely be heard coming from the unconnected cab. Also once when there was a loose connection from my guitars pickups wiring I was able to pick up a very strong AM signal on the same amp.

Yes, this happens all the time. Once, many years ago, I was watching the Climax Blues Band (now sadly defunct) playing at the university I then attended, and all of a sudden a conversation between a minicab driver and his base station started coming through the guitar amps. Very embarrassing for all concerned.

I should add that this was in the days before wireless mics and instrument transmitters - everybody was plugged into the PA via good old coax cables.



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