USAF Space Command logo before/after Star Trek?

page: 1
1
<<   2 >>

log in

join

posted on Nov, 6 2007 @ 05:35 PM
link   
I noticed the USAFSC has a similar logo to what Roddenberry created for Star Trek. Which came first? Trek was conceived in the 60's.





jra

posted on Nov, 6 2007 @ 06:09 PM
link   
The USAF Space Command was created Sept 1st, 1982. It's possible that who ever made the logo was inspired/influenced by the one in Star Trek.



posted on Nov, 6 2007 @ 06:27 PM
link   
Ok, but what if it was created in 1952? or 1962? Judging from Hoagland's new book Dark Mission, it's very plausible.

Another question is whether Roddenberry invented everything himself, or was told about proven technology that was still just a concept back then.



posted on Nov, 7 2007 @ 03:58 AM
link   
i must say that is plausible. for one exception.
the star-trek logo is a great artwork
the USAF logo appears to be the creation of an absolute noob in graphic design.



posted on Nov, 8 2007 @ 10:54 PM
link   
But still similar. It's no big deal really, the Trek point is shown in the NASA logo as well. Except here, it's upright and looks just like a com. badge.



posted on Nov, 10 2007 @ 11:43 PM
link   
The only difference is that the star trek badge has no other lettering or symbols that show's who is in charge. The star trek symbol means for all mankind and life forms not airforce space command.

[img]
[/img]



posted on Nov, 10 2007 @ 11:47 PM
link   
Ok, and what is on the NASA logo....similar to trek as well.

I think this is really interesting. How did Roddenberry know abou LAPTOPS in 1960?



posted on Nov, 11 2007 @ 12:54 AM
link   
There's no reason that some idea for a space command symbol couldn't have been drafted as far back as the mid early 60's. We knew we were going to try for the Moon by then, JFK said so before he died.

And no reason Roddenberry couldn't have seen it. He was a visionary, and might well have hung out with some Air Force types. Maybe he just adapted an early design by some Jr. Officer, who later got to use his own design for a unit patch.



posted on Nov, 11 2007 @ 12:58 AM
link   
The symbol could be a design of a comet and it's trail.

Roddenberry was like Verne and Wells. Verne spoke of submarines in the 1800's. But the laptop? The cell communicator that looks like Motorola's Startac? The technology was concieved, and the user friendly design as well.



posted on Nov, 11 2007 @ 01:56 AM
link   
Maybe Motorola's Startac looks like the communicator.


It's not very uncommon that reality catches up with the science fiction of the past. Older stories spun yarns of space travel, handheld computers, and thousands of other things we take for granted now-a-days, but back then were pure fantasy.

In my opinion, the best science fiction authors are the ones that stay one or two steps ahead of the science at the time. It's kind of like a self-fulfilling prophecy.

EDIT TO ADD:
As for the similarities between the logos, I have no idea. It very well could have been just a coincidence.

[edit on 11/11/2007 by cmdrkeenkid]


jra

posted on Nov, 11 2007 @ 04:02 AM
link   

Originally posted by StreetCorner Philosopher
Ok, and what is on the NASA logo....similar to trek as well.


You are referring to the red chevron I assume? If so, that represents the aeronautics part of NASA. The shape was based on the latest design of hypersonics wings at that time.


I think this is really interesting. How did Roddenberry know abou LAPTOPS in 1960?


He didn't know about laptops. And Roddenberry was not the sole writer for Star Trek. There were many well known science fiction writers contributing to the show. It's not uncommon to find something that was once only fiction to become a reality.


apc

posted on Nov, 11 2007 @ 09:30 AM
link   
According to Star Trek history the arrowhead Starfleet emblem originates from the NASA logo.




But as the argument can be made that Starfleet is something of an Air Force and Navy hybrid, it wouldn't surprise me if the emblem were also based on one of them.

It should be noted however that in The Original Series the arrowhead only represented the crew of the Enterprise. Each starship had its own unique emblem.

It was not until the Star Trek movies that Starfleet adopted the Enterprise logo as the official fleet insignia. The first movie, Star Trek: The Motion Picture, was created in the late 70s.



posted on Nov, 11 2007 @ 10:43 AM
link   
Well, no matter who had it first, because of the cultural phenomenon that Star Trek became, it is a good choice for use in any space venture by the US.

And who knows, because of the subliminal aspect of Star Trek in the mind of many people it could lead to a better application of space technology and exploration.

"One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind."



posted on Nov, 11 2007 @ 10:56 AM
link   

The first complete orbiter was originally planned to be named Constitution, but a massive write-in campaign from fans of the Star Trek television series convinced the White House to change the name to Enterprise.


I always thought this was an excellent idea.



posted on Nov, 11 2007 @ 12:03 PM
link   
Might I suggest that some one contact the official Star Trek fan club and ask them about the true origin of the insignia?

There might even be a FAQ on their website regarding this very question.

Alternately, you might look up Majel Barrett-Roddenbery's (Gene Roddenberry's widow) E-mail address, and ask her. I understand that she is/was quite active in all things Star Trek after Gene passed.

When seeking knowledge, it's always best to go to the source, when possible.



posted on Nov, 11 2007 @ 04:15 PM
link   
reply to post by apc
 


That is true. I do recall that from the original series. Only the Enterprise crew had the comet trail logo. Or hypersonic trail. But the line between the birth of NASA and the sci fi boom is short. It was all happening during the same time. We grew up so fast as a species in just a couple of decades.

Im sure Roddenberry was responsible for most of the look and technology produced for the show. He invented the transporter system to help his budget. He couldn't afford to create CGI for a landing party's shuttle craft. The writers came up with the stories yes, but Roddenberry was the producer.


jra

posted on Nov, 11 2007 @ 05:53 PM
link   

Originally posted by StreetCorner Philosopher
But the line between the birth of NASA and the sci fi boom is short. It was all happening during the same time.


I'm not sure if I'm understanding you correctly, but science fiction was around and popular long before NASA. There are many well known and popular science fiction novels from the 19th century, like War of the Worlds being a prime example.


We grew up so fast as a species in just a couple of decades.


Techonologically, sure. I think we have a lot more growing to do in other areas though, in my opinion anyway.


Im sure Roddenberry was responsible for most of the look and technology produced for the show.


I'm sure he approved a lot of the designs that the artists and designers came up with, but I don't think he created any of it himself. Matt Jefferies, for example, created the original Enterprise and the design of the bridge.


He invented the transporter system to help his budget. He couldn't afford to create CGI for a landing party's shuttle craft.


The concept of a transporter was around long before Star Trek. Their is a book called "The Man Without a Body" where a scientist figures out how to disassemble atoms and transmit them through a telegraph wire and reassemeble them. This was writen back in 1877 by Edward Page Mitchell. Star Trek did make the concept a lot more popular though.

And you are right that it was used for budgetary reasons. They couldn't afford much for visual effects (they didn't have CGI in the 60's
) back then.

[edit on 11-11-2007 by jra]



posted on Nov, 11 2007 @ 06:38 PM
link   
I think that the 30s, 40s, and 50s were considered the "Golden Age" of SF. Scienc fiction has made a deep impact on the thought processes of many of todays scientists and inventors.

The show Star Trek is now an cult, to some degree.



posted on Nov, 11 2007 @ 06:42 PM
link   
Yes, technologically. We have a whole lot of growing up to do before we get to be like the Vulcans.

Planet X is known to some Astronomers as Vulcan. That is freaky.

I just think Roddenberry and other prophetic writers like Verne and Wells had more than basic intuitive creative thinking. Hollywood is completely under alien control.

Universal studios, Dimension films, Columbia pictures has a logo showing the bringer of light. Paramount is what owns the rights to Trek, and I think Paramount is CBS...the all seeing Eye is their logo. Steven Spielberg created Dreamworks. The logo for that company is a boy sitting on a crescent moon and he is fishing. Who are the fish?

So I think that the NASA logo was might have inspired Roddenberry, but Roddenberry inspired the USAF Space command? I wish I knew the truth behind all this.



posted on Nov, 11 2007 @ 06:44 PM
link   
reply to post by NGC2736
 


So technological concepts are proven before they even hit a schematic of any sort? If the mind can concieve it, then it is a possibility and would automatically be assumed as a proven concept as long as the thought is applied to paper and then executed. It is very inspiring.






top topics



 
1
<<   2 >>

log in

join