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20 Things You Didn't Know About Living In Space

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posted on Nov, 6 2007 @ 03:17 AM
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20 Things You Didn't Know About Living In Space

Exploding boobs, toilet target practice, the second birth...

1 Nearly every astronaut experiences some space sickness, caused by the wildly confusing information reaching their inner ears. In addition to nausea, symptoms include headaches and trouble locating your own limbs. Just like college, really.

2 And those are the least of your worries. In weightlessness, fluids shift upward, causing nasal congestion and a puffy face; bones lose calcium, forming kidney stones; and muscles atrophy, slowing the bowels and shrinking the heart.

3 At least you’ll be puffy, constipated, and tall: The decreased pressure on the spine in zero-g causes most space travelers to grow about two inches.

discovermagazine.com...


Interesting, huh?


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Mod Note (This Appears On Every New Thread/Post Reply Page): AboveTopSecret.com takes pride in making every post count. Please do not create minimal posts or simple "I agree" posts when replying to threads. If you feel inclined to make the board aware of news, current events, or important information from other sites that supports the thread; please post one or two paragraphs, a link to the entire story, AND your opinion, twist or take on the news item as it relates to the thread.

[edit on 6/11/2007 by Mirthful Me]




posted on Nov, 6 2007 @ 03:24 AM
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Originally posted by TheoOne

4 Lab rats sent into space during midpregnancy, while their fetuses’ inner ears are developing, spawn some seriously tipsy babies (pdf).



Tipsy baby rats? That deserves it's own thread


I always thought they'd end up as rounded balls of meat.



posted on Nov, 6 2007 @ 03:26 AM
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17 NASA tried building a bathroom into its space suits—a fitted condom attached to a bladder for men, a molded gynecological insert for women—but gave up and passed out diapers to all.


That's a funny part, too.


[edit on 6-11-2007 by TheoOne]



posted on Nov, 6 2007 @ 03:27 AM
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wow. this is the most interesting thread i've seen since i've joined. learned so much from reading this. thanks.



posted on Nov, 6 2007 @ 03:30 AM
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reply to post by TheoOne
 


That's just Occam's at work

You know that joke about the 20 million dollar US pen and the 20 cent Russian pencil?



posted on Nov, 6 2007 @ 03:33 AM
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3 At least you’ll be puffy, constipated, and tall: The decreased pressure on the spine in zero-g causes most space travelers to grow about two inches.


We have found the cure for those who are vertically challeged! Just send them up to the ISS and their height goes from 5 foot to 5 foot 2 inches!



posted on Nov, 6 2007 @ 03:52 AM
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reply to post by Beachcoma
 


I don't think so, perhaps I don't remember, could you elaborate on this one for me please?



posted on Nov, 6 2007 @ 03:57 AM
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reply to post by TheoOne
 


All those troublesome symptoms can be averted by creating a 'normal' gravity which could be as simple as spinning the living compartment to produce a centrifugal force close to 1g as frequently seen in scifi movies (a very valid & do-able concept too)



posted on Nov, 6 2007 @ 04:43 AM
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Originally posted by TheoOne
reply to post by Beachcoma
 


I don't think so, perhaps I don't remember, could you elaborate on this one for me please?


NASA spent 20mil developing a pen that would work in zero gravity. Russia solved the same problem by using a 20 cent pencil.



posted on Nov, 6 2007 @ 08:07 AM
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Just to let you all know that Mars Rising on the science channel is on tonight. William Shatner narrates it and has alot of cool ideas and theories. It also has the spinning spaceship to 1g idea you mentioned Pilgrum. Mars Rising Rocket Power at 9:00 ET and Mars Rising Journey to the Red Planet at 10:00ET. Alot of things discussed about the long trip to mars. Boredom, sex, mental state etc..

Thanks for the thread TheoOne, learned alot from it. The toilet seat was interesting. What happens if you don't sit down on it just right ?



posted on Nov, 6 2007 @ 07:34 PM
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No problem Solarskye, glad you enjoyed reading it.
I guess something will very wrong happen if you don't position right.


About Mars, I believe there might be a possibility that some of the cities exist there already.

Really, Karlhungis? Damn...
Thanks for enlightening me, dude.


jra

posted on Nov, 6 2007 @ 08:02 PM
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Originally posted by Karlhungis
NASA spent 20mil developing a pen that would work in zero gravity. Russia solved the same problem by using a 20 cent pencil.


That's just an urban myth, and a false one at that. Using a pencil in 0G would not be good. If the lead tip breaks off, as they always do, you'll have bits of pencil lead floating around.

Here's the truth about the pencil/pen myth. www.truthorfiction.com...



posted on Nov, 6 2007 @ 09:11 PM
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Cool thread. I'll add a few more gee-whiz facts:

1. Nausea usually occurs just about MECO - just as the craft is going from massive acceleration to near zero-g. If you don't throw up then, you probably won't.

2. The Soyuz crafts that remain on the ISS for emergency evacuation have "custom seat covers" that match the three occupants who would ride back to earth. These custom seat pads are required because Soyuz makes a "hard landing" on land instead of sea. They prevent internal/structural damage to the occupants on landing. They are custom molded to each occupant. When a shuttle docks with ISS for crew rotation, the crew of ISS must remain on ISS and the shuttle crew must remain on shuttle until the seat covers are replaced in the Soyuz. The moment the seat covers are replaced the crew is officially rotated and everyone must be on their respective new sides of the docking port.

3. I can confirm the camera in the toilet for training purposes. lmao

4. On ISS the Russians (unless they've gotten some birds up since 2000) only get about 15 minutes per orbit of line-of-sight communications with ISS. They upload "cyclograms" at that time and those canned programs run blind through-out the orbit.

5. Neil Armstrong's first step on the moon was in his own piss. As he descended the ladder on the lander his urine bag plumbing broke and filled his boot with urine. No matter how he describes the moon's surface, the first step was "squishy".

6. Ed White was the astronaut who came closest to being exposed to the unprotected space environment. During an EVA his suit was compromised and this was not learned until after he returned to the vehicle.

7. MCC is considered a national treasure.

8. It is unknown when the Challenger astronauts died because the shuttle body literally disintegrated away from the intact cabin compartment. They continued upward for some time in the intact cabin after the shuttle body had "blown up" before beginning to descend back to earth.

9. The solution to attempting to prevent total crew loss that was developed after the Challenger catrastrophe was to design an extendable "pole" that could be stuck out the door of the shuttle and astronauts could evacuate by shimmying out on the pole. (I'm not kidding.)

10. Yes, there is bone mass loss in space, but it is asymptotic. You lose bone mass fairly rapidly for a short amount of time, but then it appears to stop after a time in space and level off.

11. The exercise equipment on the ISS (there is an exercise bike and a treadmill) had to be specially designed to not cause torque/vibrations that would greatly affect the attitude of the station.



posted on Nov, 7 2007 @ 04:56 AM
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Space sickness is unofficially measured in increments known as "Garns".
So named for the Florida senator Jake Garn who flew on STS 51D in 1985.
(Still referred to in some circles as "The Honorable Senator Upchuck")

There's no truth to the rumors that were flying around after the first husband and wife crewmembers flew together on STS 47 that sex in microgravity is made easier by A: a third person, or B: a carefully placed bungee cord.

You can faithfully simulate the donning of a certain type of Russian spacesuit with a large ball of rubber bands. Simply strip down to your longjohns, and carefully work your body into the middle of the ball.

After flying in one of those Soyuz seats, no one ever, ever, ever wants their knees that close to their eyeballs for that length of time.

[edit on 7-11-2007 by SpaceMax]

[edit on 7-11-2007 by SpaceMax]



posted on Nov, 7 2007 @ 05:44 AM
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5 No humans have yet been conceived in space, so we can only imagine.


I wonder if any Astronauts have ever joined the 60 mile high club?



9. The solution to attempting to prevent total crew loss that was developed after the Challenger catastrophe was to design an expendable "pole" that could be stuck out the door of the shuttle and astronauts could evacuate by shimmying out on the pole. (I'm not kidding.)

could you source this, it sounds crazy, yet for some way quite applicable in a government project.

[edit on 7-11-2007 by Redge777]



posted on Nov, 7 2007 @ 09:26 AM
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The solution to attempting to prevent total crew loss that was developed after the Challenger catastrophe was to design an expendable "pole" that could be stuck out the door of the shuttle and astronauts could evacuate by shimmying out on the pole. (I'm not kidding.)

ICES-Inflight Crew Escape System



posted on Nov, 7 2007 @ 09:38 AM
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Originally posted by Valhall
8. It is unknown when the Challenger astronauts died because the shuttle body literally disintegrated away from the intact cabin compartment. They continued upward for some time in the intact cabin after the shuttle body had "blown up" before beginning to descend back to earth.

They died when the cabin slammed into the ocean. Three of them activated their emergency O2 system, so we know that some of the crew wasn't immediately knocked out.



9. The solution to attempting to prevent total crew loss that was developed after the Challenger catrastrophe was to design an extendable "pole" that could be stuck out the door of the shuttle and astronauts could evacuate by shimmying out on the pole. (I'm not kidding.)


They don't shimmy down it, they ride on it like a horizontal fireman's pole. They showed how it works on "Space Cowboys."

They can also pop one of the upper windows and repel down the side of the shuttle after landing.



posted on Nov, 7 2007 @ 09:54 AM
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Originally posted by COOL HAND


They don't shimmy down it, they ride on it like a horizontal fireman's pole. They showed how it works on "Space Cowboys."

They can also pop one of the upper windows and repel down the side of the shuttle after landing.


I didn't say shimmy "down"...I said shimmy out on. It's going to laterally protrude out. And I think you've missed the whole intention...

believe it or not the pole is to evacuate during the ascent of launch...yeah, I'm still serious. They are supposed to stick this pole out, hook on to it and then evacuate going Mach "fill in the blank". I don't think the friggin pole would even hold up let alone having an astronaut hanging off of it.

P.S. I auditioned for an extra part for Space Cowboys...pfffft. One guy I worked with got picked...I think he was standing in a scene with a white lab coat on looking like the stereotypical geeky engineer/scientist.

[edit on 11-7-2007 by Valhall]



posted on Nov, 7 2007 @ 09:55 AM
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Oh, and one more thing, please don't talk like you know exactly when the Challenger crew died. It makes you look silly.



posted on Nov, 7 2007 @ 11:04 AM
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Originally posted by Valhall
believe it or not the pole is to evacuate during the ascent of launch...yeah, I'm still serious. They are supposed to stick this pole out, hook on to it and then evacuate going Mach "fill in the blank". I don't think the friggin pole would even hold up let alone having an astronaut hanging off of it.


What?

Didn't you see the link that was provided?
They can only use it at purely subsonic speeds. The suits are not designed to handle a supersonic slipstream.



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