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Invisble RFID Ink Tatoo - humans to be tagged

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posted on Nov, 1 2007 @ 01:24 AM
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This is a passive RFID technology that contains no metals; the tattoos themselves can be colored or invisible.


www.livescience.com...

It is basically a barcode encoded into a humans skin. I am guessing how it works is that it is a 2-d or 3-d barcode, with a bunch of textual information. So that medical history, ID, credit cards, can all be read from an invisible tatoo on the skin.

If you are thinking 'mark of the beast', then you are reading my mind.

The moment any human becomes 'tagged' that is the moment we lose all freedoms. We will be nothing more than marked cattle. The same level as an animal.

This scares the h*** out of me.




posted on Nov, 1 2007 @ 01:29 AM
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here are pictures of 2d and 3d barcodes, 3d doesnt mean 3 physical dimensions.

www.guj.com.br...



posted on Nov, 1 2007 @ 03:55 AM
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The mark of the beast it is, it seems!
They can put it on me when I'm dead.



posted on Nov, 1 2007 @ 04:20 PM
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Not to sound crazy but if the tattoo can be made out of invisible ink I wonder if they will start tagging people who are put under with anesthetics? You wake up after your procedure completely clueless that you now have been tagged and can be tracked.



posted on Nov, 1 2007 @ 04:43 PM
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There isn't any 'tracking' going to happen with this.

The tat head uses a number of different types of 'ink', which absorb or reflect the scanning beam which is low power microwave. It has a range of a few feet. It's for cows going through a chute. It's not capable of storing a lot of info because the marks are relatively large, they're shooting for something less than 100 bits, so it's not like you can put your life history on there, and you wouldn't want to anyway, that's nuts from a database perspective.



posted on Nov, 1 2007 @ 04:48 PM
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Whoev's got tats knows -- they hurt. And removal, I heard firsthand hurt as well, done w/ lasers. Either way, no thank you sir or ms.... I doubt (hopefully) this won't be a anesthetized happening, otherwise -- you got a lot of angry people on your hands here re: nwo. Think about waking up from a "common" operation procedure w/ the doc and the laser gun or needle!

"They're blaming me for my hardcore roar -- ain't they the ones w/ the .44?"
-Public Enemy


[edit on 1-11-2007 by anhinga]



posted on Nov, 1 2007 @ 05:03 PM
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reply to post by anhinga
 


You know, I don't think they could laser this one off of you.

While they're saying it's not metal, that's true only in a very strict sense. It's not metallic, but it uses metals. Just as oxides and ceramics. So they're sort of lying about that - it's lead, barium, titanium, niobium and the gang, just not as metallic forms.

Unlike dye which you can render clear, you wouldn't be able to make the metals go away. Maybe you could tat over it. Or use a dermatome and carve it off.



posted on Nov, 1 2007 @ 05:10 PM
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Yeah, I hear ya Tom, "and the gang" referring to a number of toxic substances you do not want in your body.


Readers should note that VeriChip tags for patients are FDA approved and VeriChip tags have been proposed for immigrants.


Not like that surprises me, they'll approve any special-interest, gov't control poison imaginable. Also this is in regards to it's intro and, as usual, soldiers as experimental guinea pigs:


It could help identify friends or foes, prevent friendly fire, and help save soldiers' lives," he said. "It's a very scary proposition when you're dealing with humans, but with military personnel, we're talking about saving soldiers' lives and it may be something worthwhile.


[edit on 1-11-2007 by anhinga]



posted on Nov, 1 2007 @ 05:11 PM
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so which is it? rfid or barcode?

rfid implies there's some sort of device that can respond with an identifier of some kind when pulsed with an electromagnetic charge. i find it highly unlikely that this could be accomplished with ink. however, we do have UV ink. the problem is that if you made a barcode from it, the resolution would need to be relatively low since the ink tends to dissipate in the skin a little over the years. too small and it wouldn't be readable after not too long.



posted on Nov, 1 2007 @ 05:15 PM
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Well, one link above had the actual barcodes photo. A couple of "regular" ones and then "3D" snowflakes (???!!! obviously to push on children and the dumbed-down who knows nothing about concentration camps) and other patterns like "matriz" and "code 1" -- I tried attaching the photo on the page -- if it's a scale/photo issue, Mods, try to get one up here proper sized, this is seriously sickening.



posted on Nov, 1 2007 @ 05:31 PM
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Another problem I see is the "Art" of tatooing.

There's a reason they do tatoos in studios, and not with machines that can stamp any pattern you select.

Each human body is different. Different people have skin that grows, scars and looks different.

The whole point of barcoding the public would be mass production. And I just don't think tatoos are mass producible in an information-carrying capacity.

Worse, if it's invisible, how do they know who's been tagged? Cattle ranchers still rely on hair singe brands because you can see them from a hundred yards away. Not so with any RFID or such. One of the problems with exotic meats like ostrich is there's no way to brand them that doesn't either hurt the animal or become invisible at a distance or after a few weeks. Basically, cows make good billboards.

People who've used RFID on cows are extremely succeptible to theft. Most sheriff departments and brand inspectors cannot see that a steer is obviously someone else's, and won't even bother looking into it.

As far as medical history on individual steers, ear tags are cheap and can be read by anyone. (sample of ear tag technology)Also, they only make one hole in the steer, versus lots of holes for a tattoo. Even so, notice how much they brag on that site about their "low" infection rates. In the cattle business, even 3% mortality can mean the difference between profit and loss.

Upshot is this. Not only will "tattoos" not be used for humans, I don't see them in current form being used on cattle.

Tattoos ARE used under the lip of racehorses, to prove ownership. But those are multimillion dollar studs. A few people I know brand horses; but unlike cattle, horse hair is to thin, and you risk burning the horse. A proper cattle brand just singes the hair--not blistering the skin or anything. It also grows over with hair in 8 mo. - 1 year.

.



posted on Nov, 1 2007 @ 05:36 PM
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I don't want to sound alarmist but could this whole Mark of the Beast thing be designed to cull off devout christians to depopulate the western world ?

I have long suspected that the idea was to implement something so repugnant to the Christians but yet needed to survive that they would perish willingly thinking its the "End Times" ? This whole mark of the beast thing is an interpretation of scripture and could potentially be a con to trick people into thinking the Sun of Perdidtion is here and tribulation times ahead.



posted on Nov, 1 2007 @ 05:43 PM
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Originally posted by an0maly33
so which is it? rfid or barcode?

rfid implies there's some sort of device that can respond with an identifier of some kind when pulsed with an electromagnetic charge. i find it highly unlikely that this could be accomplished with ink.


The RFID part of it is hype, actually.

What you have is a tat made out of various dielectric materials suspended in a liquid (they're calling that ink), which after tatting into the top layer of skin can be scanned with a very high frequency specialized radar head. So it's a tat that's visible in the microwave region, if you want to think of it that way. Or you can think of it as a checkout scanner in a grocery store, only instead of using a fairly well collimated red laser, they're using a "sort of collimated" 1GHz microwave beam.



posted on Nov, 1 2007 @ 05:46 PM
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reply to post by Tom Bedlam
 


what would be the distance for reading a thing like this? Feet?



posted on Nov, 1 2007 @ 05:49 PM
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reply to post by dr_strangecraft
 


Yep, not more than that. At a distance, you have beam spreading issues, and the scanners generally have a receiver on one side and the scanning head on the other; you're looking for very small variations in scattering of the beam when it hits the bars.

Another way to do it is to have the receive antenna up front, maybe polarize the transmit beam and look for backscatter, but again it's pretty close range, because not only are you getting scanning beam spread, but you don't have much signal, either.



posted on Nov, 1 2007 @ 06:14 PM
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your d.n.a is the most dangerous marker of all.it leaves a trail everywhere ,to be cheaply collected and analysed.



posted on Nov, 1 2007 @ 06:43 PM
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I've seen mainstream news programs where they got some brainwashed mk ultra family loving getting chipped. It was disgusting and I can't forget it, reada little about it, the region where they put it, usually the arm, gets cancer pretty quick, there's been animal instances where it turns that area into a lesion infection.

Now, this? Tattoos? Come on, the threats are all in place, once the soldiers accept this garbage, they'll be pushing it everywhere.

Keep an eye on this, I can imagine it popping up in network tv, for those that watch, keep the board posted.

Dangerous, absolutely, the worst part is like some other posters mentioned, getting the religious angle, people, millions of, can be tricked into getting this? Seriously, it could happen.

Some are missing the pt, forget chip or tatt, it's not like yr sitting whereev you're at, thinking about yr new tattoo or chip -- THINK -- you're in a slave camp in Kansas shoveling rocks all day as they scan you into bunks at night. Executive orders can turn the US into a slave police state. There's 15 freaking pages of them.

[edit on 1-11-2007 by anhinga]



posted on Nov, 2 2007 @ 03:56 AM
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Here is more info:


The process developed by Somark involves a geometric array of micro-needles and a reusable applicator with a one-time-use ink capsule. Pydynowski said it takes five to 10 seconds to "stamp or tattoo" an animal, and there is no need to remove the fur. The ink remains in the dermal layer, and a reader can detect it from 4 feet away.


www.eetimes.eu...

To the person who asked above, it is both, its an RFID tag in the form of a tattoo. The 'ink' is really a chemical mixture that act as a circuit, which is then tattooed into the skin.

I was thinking it was a bit different, in the form of a barcode, but its not.



posted on Nov, 2 2007 @ 06:31 AM
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Originally posted by Tom Bedlam
It's not capable of storing a lot of info because the marks are relatively large, they're shooting for something less than 100 bits...

I don't know if they would need to actually store much information on it at all. Just a number, which brings up your file on an enormous database would do the trick. Scary stuff.


As for it somehow benefiting soldiers? Yes. But no more than a dog tag. A tattoo can be just as easily lost or destroyed in combat, if not easier since it's on flesh and not metal.


[edit on 2/11/07 by NuclearPaul]



posted on Nov, 2 2007 @ 07:07 AM
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Originally posted by elusivetruth
To the person who asked above, it is both, its an RFID tag in the form of a tattoo. The 'ink' is really a chemical mixture that act as a circuit, which is then tattooed into the skin.

I was thinking it was a bit different, in the form of a barcode, but its not.



Not at all. They are not tattooing some sort of circuit onto the skin. It is a barcode, and it's done with "inks" that are reactive at the target frequency, which is in the GHz range.

The Israelis were messing around with this same thing earlier but didn't productize it.



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