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Astronomy Photo of the Day Website

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posted on Oct, 26 2007 @ 09:36 AM
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Trying to cheer myself up over here from some of those awful news topics of this young day on the U.S. east coast. This is a site for daily photos/info about the Universe. antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov...



[edit on 26-10-2007 by anhinga]




posted on Oct, 26 2007 @ 09:41 AM
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reply to post by anhinga
 


Nice one Anhinga


You're right...Sometimes, looking at natural stuff as amazing as this makes the troubles in the world just melt away, for a few minute...

Thanks for the post


Peace



posted on Oct, 28 2007 @ 10:06 PM
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hey,

great site, thanks for posting the link... I added it to my IE favorites. As the previous poster mentions, looking at the stars seems to relax me and I just forget about everything else... I love pictures like these.

Thanks again



posted on Oct, 28 2007 @ 10:11 PM
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Found this image, awesome...




posted on Oct, 28 2007 @ 10:17 PM
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That site has been one of my "daily visits" for years now..
all the ones that have come and gone.. that one has always
stayed..



posted on Oct, 31 2007 @ 07:03 AM
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Happy Halloween ATS!



[edit on 31-10-2007 by anhinga]



posted on Oct, 31 2007 @ 11:20 PM
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i've had APOD as my IE start page since about '97... one of the greatest sites ever; i love that site... good post for all the peeps who didn't know about it...



posted on Nov, 19 2007 @ 01:32 PM
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Today's photo truly seems 'otherworldly' -- This is in Juneau, Alaska w/ an open shutter on the camera. The caption mentions the human eye can't see certain things. Check out that red glow in the middle, right of the image, between that and the green aurora, as well as the ice foreground, an amazing photo:




[edit on 19-11-2007 by anhinga]



posted on Nov, 19 2007 @ 06:56 PM
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OP, great post, as usual. Wonderful photos. Like so many here, I love the stars.

I realize that for countless ages our ancestors have looked at the sky and marveled at those far off lights. But in some ways it seems that it is something more. As if within humans there is a longing for the stars, like one would long for an absent lover. As if once we held them close, and regret the loss now that they are so far removed.

Fanciful, I know. And so unscientific. But I don't regret feeling that way.



posted on Nov, 19 2007 @ 07:02 PM
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reply to post by NGC2736
 


...and thank you NGC2736 for your poetic response.... seems like we're set out for 'space exploration' since we had the capacity to discover. Wishing for less of geopolitical problems, war(s) & more for science & space. Hey, one can dream!



posted on Nov, 19 2007 @ 07:05 PM
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Originally posted by NGC2736
As if within humans there is a longing for the stars, like one would long for an absent lover.


Nah, humans, just like crows, monkeys and moths like shiny objects


Man, I'm growing more cynical by the day... gotta stop reading the newspapers thinking how stupid people as a whole are...


Dae

posted on Nov, 19 2007 @ 07:57 PM
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reply to post by Beachcoma
 


Give up the newspapers I say! Unhealthy past time, ranks there with sunbeds and treadmills.

I would agree with you about the shiny object theory but I know from my own personal experience that I can say I have never felt a longing quite like the one when I look at the stars. I even feel a connection with the Divine, so to speak, and Ive felt this way since I was a little human.

Back to the shiny object theory. Shiny is also know as 'refracting light' and most things on this planet are attracted to it, primarily because it gives energy and without that, no life babeh. So perhaps humans and crows alike are designed to be attracted to it for Health & Safety policies hardwired as insurance strategy for survival because yeah gosh, we are dumb mwahahaha



posted on Nov, 20 2007 @ 07:31 PM
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I love the photo of the day website.
Nice post anhinga and pictures too! I've always loved this one. The Horsehead Nebula.



I also ran across this today and loved it! Some of you probably have seen it before, but for those who haven't enjoy.




posted on Nov, 20 2007 @ 07:36 PM
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reply to post by Solarskye
 


Amazing shot, Solarsky! I was going through some and found these M13/ Hercules and Alpha Centauri images -- so many stars, I read one line in a print WSJ article that always sticks in my head, it was from a general 'conspiracy' article (maybe science) and the paraphrase was along the lines of "the Universe is teeming w/ life" (tried a search, couldn't find an online article) and when I see these images, I think we're not alone.





posted on Nov, 20 2007 @ 07:52 PM
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Nice!
I try to imagine all the pictures we can't see of space. Like the ones on the other side of our galaxy and of course all the areas in each and every galaxy out there. But it's just to huge to comprehend such a vast universe.
And of course my all time favorite.



[edit on 11/20/2007 by Solarskye]



posted on Nov, 22 2007 @ 10:09 AM
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...from the Pleiades -- happy Thanksgiving ATS!




posted on Nov, 22 2007 @ 10:24 AM
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reply to post by anhinga
 

The beauty of this image cannot be described in words: this image talks by itself.
So, i'll say just thank you for sharing it!!!



posted on Nov, 22 2007 @ 11:13 AM
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reply to post by internos
 


As always, my pleasure... here's two more from the Pleiades!
One for scale in the Universe and the other, well, just another beauty of a view of one of our neighbors!






posted on Nov, 22 2007 @ 11:28 AM
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This is a view from the ISS, the same view from the South Pole. A couple of nebula's intersecting! Amazing!




posted on Nov, 30 2007 @ 07:19 AM
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...I know there's a lot of Moon interest in these parts, thought to drop this one from today -- have a good weekend everybody at ATS!


Anchored in the vast lava flows of the Moon's Oceanus Procellarum lies the Aristarchus Plateau. The bright impact crater at the corner of the plateau is Aristarchus, a young crater 42 kilometers wide and 3 kilometers deep. Only slightly smaller, lava flooded Herodotus crater is above and to the left. A valley or rille feature likely carved by rapidly flowing lava or a collapsed lava tunnel, Vallis Schroteri....








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