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Oil on mars......Halaburton primed!

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posted on Jan, 27 2004 @ 05:30 PM
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Now, it's all begining to make sense.
Bush's sudden interest in sending more missions
to mars.

www.petroleumnews.com...




posted on Jan, 27 2004 @ 05:31 PM
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riiiight. The only problem with that is that there would have had to be large life forms on the planet to create that oil...



posted on Jan, 27 2004 @ 05:32 PM
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Originally posted by fortean
Now, it's all begining to make sense.
Bush's sudden interest in sending more missions
to mars.

www.petroleumnews.com...


Nowhere in that article does it mention drilling for oil. Also, you need living creatures to decay to create it, and we dont even know if life is on mars.

[Edited on 1/27/2004 by Seapeople]



posted on Jan, 27 2004 @ 05:33 PM
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Originally posted by junglejake
riiiight. The only problem with that is that there would have had to be large life forms on the planet to create that oil...


They don't have to be large. IF there was alot of plant matter (even algae) at one point, it could become oil.



posted on Jan, 27 2004 @ 05:41 PM
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That would be one hell of a pipeline



posted on Jan, 27 2004 @ 05:43 PM
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I read somewhere recently that scientists are
reconsidering the theory that ALL oil comes from
decaying plants and animals. Well most of it DOES.
But some is formed by geological pressure.
I'm looking for the article now, but I'm sure
the bush administration's interest in going to
the moon and mars isn't only to "boldly go
where no man has gone before" and all that crap.

seattletimes.nwsource.com...



posted on Jan, 27 2004 @ 05:49 PM
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There is no way shipping oil from mars could even come close to being cost effective, it would cost thousands of times more to ship it than it was worth



posted on Jan, 27 2004 @ 05:57 PM
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I'm sure we have some kind of black buget
space ship that can trasport oil.
That's what our tax dollars have really been
going for


www.rushlimbaugh.com...



posted on Jan, 27 2004 @ 06:02 PM
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If we could get to mars that cheap there would be cities, hell whole countries on mars by know



posted on Jan, 27 2004 @ 09:44 PM
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If you want the most thought provoking article on how oil is really created, read this: www.wired.com...

Thomas Gold is probably one of the most famous scientist of our time but doesn't get all the credit he deserves.

Our world is swimming in oil in pretty much every location and he has proven it - but his work is usually censored. And we all know why. Wired had this article about his new work a while back, read it. ^

Thomas Gold (born 1920 May 22) is an American astrophysicist and a member of the US National Academy of Sciences.




Astrophysics
Gold is a researcher in cosmology and magnetic fields, and coined the term "magnetosphere" for the Earth's magnetic fields. Soon after the discovery of pulsars in 1968, he correctly identified these objects as rapidly rotating neutron stars with strong magnetic fields.

For a number of years Gold promoted the idea that many portions of the surface of the Moon were likely to be covered with a thick layer of dust. His opinion influenced the design of the American Surveyor lunar landing probes, but their precautions turned out to be unnecessary, as Gold had overestimated the extent to which cyclic thermal expansion and contraction would pulverise lunar surface rock.


Origins of petroleum
Most recently, Gold is famous for his 1992 paper "The deep hot biosphere" in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, which presented a controversial theory of the origin of oil and gas deposits. Gold believes that crude oil deposits are caused by natural gas flows which feed bacteria living at extreme depths under the surface of the Earth. He also published a book of the same title in 1999, which expanded on the arguments in his 1992 paper and included speculations on the origin of life.

According to Gold and others, these bacteria account for the presence of biological debris in fossil fuels, obviating the need to resort to a biogenic theory for the origin of the latter. Bacterial action may also explain oddities in the concentration of other mineral deposits.

Most western geologists and petrologists consider petroleum abiogenic theories to be implausible and believe that the biogenic theory of fossil fuel formation adequately explains all observed fossil fuel deposits. Most geologists do recognize that the geologic carbon cycle includes subducted carbon which returns to the surface, with studies showing the carbon does rise in various ways. Gold and geology experts point out the biogenic theories do not explain facts such as helium in oil fields and oil fields being associated with deep geologic features.

However, recent discoveries have shown that bacteria live at depths far greater than previously believed. Whilst this does not prove Gold's theory, it certainly lends support to its arguments. A thermal depolymerization process which is converting animal waste to carbon fuels does show some processes can be done without bacterial action but does not explain details of natural oil deposits such as magnetite production.



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