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The 'Lost Civilisation' - Compelling Evidence

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posted on Oct, 31 2007 @ 12:54 PM
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reply to post by Skyfloating
 

Hello Skyfoating,


Have you heard the stories / seen the pictures about the wall being constructed around the entire giza area...and not only around the pyramids but far into the desert?

If so, do you have any idea on this?


SC: I have not myself heard of this but I have a contact who lives very near Giza so I will see what I can find out from them and let you know as soon as.

Best,

SC




posted on Oct, 31 2007 @ 09:46 PM
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Hey Scott,

I've become very fascinated with the pyramids and why they were built. The precision by which these structures were executed boggles my mind. I had read somewhere that despite the massive size and weight that behold these structures, not to mention the duration of their existence, one would expect to have seen them sink into the ground alot more than they actually have. That the actual amount they've sunk into the earth is fairly small...

So I've wondered what is at the base of these pyramids that have kept them erect and unsinkable for so long?

Now here's a thought that came to my mind, and it it's pretty farfetched I must admit, but hear me out. Could these structures actually be octahedrons (like my avatar
)? With the top half being what we account for visually, and the bottom half being underground acting as its base? Have there been studies done on the base of the pyramids or what may lie beneath?

Thanks.

[edit on 31-10-2007 by PhotonEffect]



posted on Nov, 1 2007 @ 05:10 AM
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reply to post by PhotonEffect
 


Hello PhotonEffect,

Thank you for your post – I have a great admiration for people who like to think out of the sarcophagus.


PhononEffect: Could these structures actually be octahedrons? With the top half being what we account for visually, and the bottom half being underground acting as its base?


SC: There seems to be a clear progression in the use of particular foundations by the AEs and is in itself indicative of a ‘learning curve’. They began initially building on compacted sand foundations (the ‘Bent Pyramid’ at Dashur), progressed onto using courses of white limestone foundations (Sneferu’s) and finally realised that only solid bedrock could prevent their constructions from slippage and this is what we have at Giza.

It is also very doubtful that such octahedrons would form themselves into an arrangement of Orion’s Belt stars with the smaller ones (the so-called ‘Queens Pyramids’) perfectly depicting the precessional motion of the belt stars.


PhotonEffect: Have there been studies done on the base of the pyramids or what may lie beneath?


SC: Extensive geomorphic and seismographic studies have been made on the Giza plateau over the years and no such formations have ever been detected - just solid bedrock.

Best,

SC



posted on Nov, 1 2007 @ 11:00 PM
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reply to post by Scott Creighton
 


Understood. I like the work you've presented so far and look forward to seeing what your research has yet to uncover.

Cheers.



posted on Nov, 2 2007 @ 05:43 AM
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reply to post by PhotonEffect
 

Hell PhotonEffect,


Understood. I like the work you've presented so far and look forward to seeing what your research has yet to uncover.


SC: Thanks for your kind words. It's always good to hear that people appreciate what you are doing..

Best,

SC



posted on Nov, 2 2007 @ 03:17 PM
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reply to post by Skyfloating
 

Hello SkyFloating,


Have you heard the stories / seen the pictures about the wall being constructed around the entire giza area...and not only around the pyramids but far into the desert?

If so, do you have any idea on this?



"Zahi's Wall" has been under construction for about five years and is now complete. It varies from a fence with a solid base to a much more substantial and solid structure nearer the Sphinx Village. It surrounds the entire plateau which can now be sealed at night so you can't stay after the closing time which I used to do to watch the sunset. Many tourists aren't even aware of it as it's out of site from the areas immediately surrounding the pyramids but in other areas it's a hideous eyesore. www.egyptarchive.co.uk... It's meant to stop the local camel riders and such from bothering tourists and to stop the encroachment of buildings onto the plateau. From what I've seen it's not very successful at either. The locals certainly know how to get around it and I've been helped by local contacts to get onto the plateau outside opening hours.


Hope this answers your question.

Best wishes,

SC



posted on Nov, 2 2007 @ 03:30 PM
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reply to post by Scott Creighton
 



Well, the reason I ask you if you might know more is because there is speculation that the very costly wall is not about keeping camel riders out (which it is not succesfully doing anyway) but pertains to new discoveries that have been made underground that stretch further out into the desert. These speculations came up when it was noticed that the wall stretches much further out than would be necessary to protect the place.

Theres a whole book written about the wall and the idea of new discoveries beneath the desert, but its not available in English yet.

So I thought Id ask someone who is updated on giza-news. But I see that this was news for you too. We´ll see what comes up in the future.



posted on Nov, 2 2007 @ 03:40 PM
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reply to post by Skyfloating
 

Hello Skyfloating,


These speculations came up when it was noticed that the wall stretches much further out than would be necessary to protect the place.

Theres a whole book written about the wall and the idea of new discoveries beneath the desert, but its not available in English yet.


If my theory is correct, then there is 'something' buried (possibly the 'Giza Codex') deep underground far to the southwest of Giza. This point in the Egyptian desert marks the apex of the Great Giza Triangle. You can see this here:

www.scottcreighton.co.uk...

It would be interesting to discover precisely where the 'wall' goes. I will try and find out.

Best wishes,

SC



posted on Nov, 2 2007 @ 03:44 PM
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reply to post by Scott Creighton
 


Interesting. Just in case you dont find out how far the wall goes, let me know and I will scan a map of the wall and upload it to ATS.



posted on Nov, 11 2007 @ 10:43 AM
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Did you manage to compare the size of the wall with your map calculations?



posted on Nov, 11 2007 @ 01:54 PM
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reply to post by Skyfloating
 

Hello Skyfloating,


Skyfloating: Did you manage to compare the size of the wall with your map calculations?


SC: Sorry - haven't been able to do much with this at the moment as I have been very busy working on some new ideas which came to me recently. I will be posting these on ATS very soon. Some pretty amazing material.

Your map would be helpful if you can scan and upload.

Best wishes,

Scott



posted on Nov, 20 2007 @ 05:14 AM
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Here is a map of how far the Giza Wall extends.

Let me know if it corresponds with your locations.






posted on Nov, 20 2007 @ 06:27 AM
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reply to post by Skyfloating
 


Hello SkyFloating,

Thanks for your post.


SkyFloating: Let me know if it corresponds with your locations.


SC: Here's a slide with my Great Giza Triangle (GGT) overlaid with Hawass's 'Wall'.



It is intriguing that the wall presents the vague outline of a triangle with the apex far to the southwest of Menkaure's pyramid thus mimicking the general outline of the GGT - or is it just me seeing this? Certainly if something does indeed exist under the sands at the Apex of the GGT it would make sense to ensure this location is well within the boundary of Hawass's 'Wall - which it is.

Interesting.

Best wishes,

Scott Creighton



posted on Nov, 20 2007 @ 07:04 AM
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reply to post by Scott Creighton
 


Its not just you seeing this. It was your triangle that actually reminded me of the map of the wall. The shapes roughly coincide. One wonders why Hawass is protecting a bunch of desert sand out there.

Keep up the good work.



posted on Nov, 22 2007 @ 01:07 PM
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Originally posted by srsen
Finally, I will end with this. Should we consider if the Pyramids are much older than the astrological alignments suggest? Could they be 25,000 years old? What about 50,000 or 75,000 years old?

Ever since reading about the proposed alternative dates for Giza, I've wondered whether proponents of the theory could just be guilty of ascribing the plan to a rather modest date. After all, there's little to oppose the idea that Giza is flagging the start point of the previous 'swing' of Orion around 36,500 BC, or maybe earlier. Discoveries accounting for catastrophic global events in 10,500 BC might only show that such events occur in a predictable manner, correlating to the swing of Orion. Could there have been a similar event in 23,500 BC? 36,500 BC, 49,500 BC? 62,500 BC?

To be honest, I'm almost more inclined to believe that Giza was planned with a 36,500 BC (or earlier) date in mind. Those extra millenia between then and now allow for far easier burial, decomposition, and general loss of archeological evidence for a lost civilization than 10,500 BC (although I strongly believe this doesn't discount 10,500 BC as a possibility in any way).



posted on Nov, 23 2007 @ 11:44 AM
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reply to post by Cythraul
 

Hello again, Cythraul,


Cythraul: Discoveries accounting for catastrophic global events in 10,500 BC might only show that such events occur in a predictable manner, correlating to the swing of Orion. Could there have been a similar event in 23,500 BC? 36,500 BC, 49,500 BC? 62,500 BC?


SC: This is why I believe the Khufu Queens depict the future date c.2,500AD - it IS a cycle we are being 'warned' of. The work of Dr Paul LaViolette explains how the core ogf our Galaxy enters an explosive phase every 10,000 years or so, sending vollies of cosmic radiation towards our solar system. The shockwave could also nudge bollides/asteroids from the Kuipier belt into a collision course with the Earth. Sometimes bollides are knocked into our path but most times they are not - but the cycle never changes. A good analogy is the 11-year sunspot cycle - we are aware of the cycle but we do not know if it will actually result in a hotter summer every 11 years because sometimes it does not. However, best to have the sunblock ready just in case.

Forewarned is forearmed.

I am not aware of such an event having occurred prior to c.10,500BC. Since there is now scientific evidence indicating a catastrophic Earth event having occurred c.10,500BC I think this would have provided sufficient impetus for the ancients to ensure future civilisations were warned of such a potentially catastrophic cycle, the harbinger of which is the appearance of a 'Blue Star' in the north eastern Sky.

Human civilisation may well go back far into antiquity than anyone has dared propose (with the exception of Cremo & Thompson); they may well have observed the cyclical appearance of a Blue Star in the north eastern sky around every 13,000 years. The Blue Star most often than not comes and goes without incident. However, last time the ancients observed the return of this 'Blue Star' (i.e. glactic core explosion) it brought with it (666 years later) a terrible calamity upon the Earth.

So, watch for the return of the 'Blue Star' - this will coincide approximately when the Orion Belt stars reach minimum culmination on the eastern horizon C.2,500AD.

(And look at the reverse of your 1 dollar bill).

Best wishes,

Scott Creighton



posted on Nov, 23 2007 @ 01:24 PM
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Scott,

Keep up the good work
I am fascinated by Pyramids
And I hadn't read about this anywhere else
Your an asset to ATS

Thanks!



posted on Nov, 23 2007 @ 01:51 PM
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Hi Scott! I'm enjoying your posts and insights. I've been wondering about the something for a long time now...The founder of Notre Dame University adored all things Egypt. At the first of the year he would give a gift basket to some of the social elite in the area...one item in the basket was a cake in the shape of a pyramid.
Now, what has stumped me is the fact that he damn near had a hissy fit when he requested to have his Golden Dome built, the request was at first denied, he then barricaded himself in a room at Holy Cross College until they gave in and gave him the green light to build it. On top of the Golden Dome is the Blessed Mother and at her feet is a serpent w/ a dog's head...the dog star. Not many people are aware of it's existence.

I couldn't wrap my brain around the significance but now I'm *that* much closer! Thanks!
P.S. I do have a photo taken by a friend of mine who's lived on campus over 50 years...this is his quest...the sacred geometry of the University.



posted on Nov, 23 2007 @ 02:59 PM
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reply to post by Scott Creighton
 

Wow! Thanks Scott that's truly fascinating. I've never heard of the blue star but I'm certainly going to be looking into that. I find the '666' year warning particularly interesting. No wonder it has been deemed the number of the beast (although I've recently read that the real number of the beast is actually 616).

As for the back of the dollar bill - I can only assume you're referring to occult symbolism. I think there's little doubt that clues are prevalent before our very eyes that relate the secrets of Giza and of mankind's forgotten past. Giza itself is a huge glaringly obvious example of this.

reply to post by moonvibe
 

Interesting input moonvibe. Another piece of the puzzle I'll be keen to read up on.



posted on Nov, 24 2007 @ 10:48 AM
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reply to post by scriptz
 

Hello Scriptz,

Many thanks for your post. Appreciate your kind thoughts.

Best wishes,

Scott Creighton





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