Temperature on Mars is +- 70F/20C !!!

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PAX

posted on Jan, 24 2004 @ 03:24 PM
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Has anybody checked the temperature on Mars lately ?
It looks like it`s +- 70F/20C in wide areas around equatorial regions ... this means that NASA`s theory that it`s impossible to have liquid water on Mars is completely wrong.


Temperature on Mars :

emma.la.asu.edu...

emma.la.asu.edu...


ESA Picture :

www.esa.int...




posted on Jan, 24 2004 @ 03:30 PM
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Originally posted by PAX
Has anybody checked the temperature on Mars lately ?
It looks like it`s +- 70F/20C in wide areas around equatorial regions ... this means that NASA`s theory that it`s impossible to have liquid water on Mars is completely wrong.


Temperature on Mars :


emma.la.asu.edu...

emma.la.asu.edu...


ESA Picture :

www.esa.int...




how can ou have water at the equator when its all frozen at the north pole?



posted on Jan, 24 2004 @ 03:30 PM
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Wow! Excellent find. Other members may have already known this but it's news to me. That seems like a quite pleasant equatorial region to live in, climatologically speaking. I always wondered how Mars maintained such a cool temperature (below 0 degrees celcius) with such an abundant supply of CO2 in the atmosphere, its the worst greenhouse has you know... Guess it can be quite nice there, despite the huge temperature variation between the equator and the poles. Hope technology increases at such an exponential rate that I may purchase real estate there and retire.


PAX

posted on Jan, 24 2004 @ 03:36 PM
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CrazyIvan...

What are you talking about ?... Does the fact that we have frozen water in our own poles here on Earth affect
water in the Dead Sea?... Off course not.
It`s very possible to have a Dead Sea on Mars also, while there is ice in the poles.



posted on Jan, 24 2004 @ 03:39 PM
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Very true... and I hope that now since the possobility of liquid water being on Mars has risen, they will search harder so we can find it sooner.



posted on Jan, 24 2004 @ 03:49 PM
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Is this upper atmosphere, or surface albedo?

It's worth noting that it's several thousand degrees in the upper atmosphere on Earth, so if this is the atmospheric temperature, it's not surprising and may not mean it's above freezing on the surface.



[Edited on 24-1-2004 by Zzub]



posted on Jan, 24 2004 @ 05:10 PM
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This means that in 50 yrs mars will be nothing but condos, casinos, and old people



posted on Jan, 24 2004 @ 05:13 PM
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I have posted that here before with links also. But I do agree with the gist of your thread that water and life did and can exist on mars (if in fact it does not presently).



posted on Jan, 24 2004 @ 05:17 PM
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Is this upper atmosphere, or surface albedo?


According to the link it seems to be the surface daytime temp



posted on Jan, 24 2004 @ 05:17 PM
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Whoops

[Edited on 24-1-2004 by Amuk]



posted on Jan, 24 2004 @ 05:36 PM
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Originally posted by Zzub
It's worth noting that it's several thousand degrees in the upper atmosphere on Earth,


Uh, no it isn't.

Temperatures in earth's atmosphere are as follows:

Troposphere: 40 to -50 degrees Celsius. This is out your window, to where clouds form. Thats 104 F to -58 F

Stratosphere: 0 to -75 degrees Celsius. This is where everything gets cooooooold. 32F to -103F

Mesosphere: -75 to -50 degreest Celsius. Warms a bit. Composed almost exactly like troposphere, but thinner.
-103F to -58F.

Thermosphere: 30 degrees Celsius. Absorption of UV-rays causes high temperatures here. 86F.

Exosphere: Far, Far below 0. This is 'inner' space kids.

Also, they neglect to mention the fact that the 20 should have a - in front of it.

This shows that it is -125 to -20 F. Not the pic, but the paragraph.

Also, this is in Farenheit, where a 20 would indicate a ways below freezing. It's -20, so It's frickin cold out there!



posted on Jan, 24 2004 @ 05:40 PM
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www.windows.ucar.edu...&edu%3Dhigh

www.mardiros.net...

A quick search for THERMOSPHERE on google provides many links with references to temperatures of thousands of degrees.

With all due respect, I believe I'm correct.


PAX

posted on Jan, 24 2004 @ 05:47 PM
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It`s not Fahrenheit.
The picture clearly shows -125C to 20C C is for Celsius
not Fahrenheit (F) !
You should check the site,it`s the Mars Global Surveyor
Thermal Emission Spectrometer,updated everyday.

emma.la.asu.edu...
emma.la.asu.edu...



posted on Jan, 24 2004 @ 07:38 PM
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From page 212 of Orbiting the Sun by Fred L. Whipple (this edition published in 1981):

"The so-called oases in the Phoenicis Lacus (Solic Lacus) and Noachis sectors show daily temperatures of -53 to +22 degrees C in the summer..." (Data taken from global temperature structure of the surface provided by Viking Orbiter 1.



posted on Jan, 24 2004 @ 07:41 PM
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breaking news.....we found h2o on mars like a few days ago.....get updated



posted on Jan, 24 2004 @ 07:42 PM
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Originally posted by silQ
breaking news.....we found h2o on mars like a few days ago.....get updated


Hey silQ...get a clue before some one bitch-slaps you right here in front of God and everybody.

We are talking about TEMPERATURES...go away if you haven't got anything to contribute.



posted on Jan, 24 2004 @ 08:39 PM
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did we really find water one mars.... a few days ago?? Break the news to me please....



posted on Jan, 24 2004 @ 09:14 PM
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Originally posted by PAX
CrazyIvan...

What are you talking about ?... Does the fact that we have frozen water in our own poles here on Earth affect
water in the Dead Sea?... Off course not.
It`s very possible to have a Dead Sea on Mars also, while there is ice in the poles.




there is no liquid water on mars. those blue spots dont mean water. its where water used to be



posted on Jan, 24 2004 @ 09:19 PM
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Amuk is right in pointing out those are day time temps. Nighttime temps are quite intolerably cold.



posted on Jan, 24 2004 @ 09:20 PM
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Zzub, that says that it can max out at about 1,500 degrees in times of high solar activity.

You stated that earth's upper atmosphere's temperature is several thousands of degrees.

It is roughly 30 degrees celsius on average. We've just learned this in science.

Hair splitting, but you aren't right.


and PAX, thanks, erh, you don't seem to have read what I posted, or notice that the link I provided was actually on the same site. A quote from that same site:

"The warmest temperatures of about -65 degrees Fahrenheit are observed near the surface and equator."

Those schematics aren't even of the surface, their of the atmosphere, and they show the amount of dust flying around, causing friction and heat. They don't show Mars' surface temp.





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