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I've always wondered...

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posted on Jan, 24 2004 @ 10:18 AM
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How come in all of the pictures we recieve from space, such as pictures from the moon showing the Earth, do not show STARS in them? I man... we can see them here from Earth, so how come they can't take pictures of them in space? Maybe this is a long answered question, but I haven't recieved the answer. Perhaps it is because the camera's filter out the light of the other stars, or the reflecting light of the Earth causes the stars light to be too dim, kinda how if your in a city you can see less stars?




posted on Jan, 24 2004 @ 11:09 AM
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Originally posted by DarkHelmet
Perhaps it is because the camera's filter out the light of the other stars, or the reflecting light of the Earth causes the stars light to be too dim, kinda how if your in a city you can see less stars?

I believe that's it...
Like staring into a spot light; you can't see images behind it that are normally lit....

[Edited on 24-1-2004 by intelgurl]



posted on Jan, 24 2004 @ 12:51 PM
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Originally posted by DarkHelmet
How come in all of the pictures we recieve from space, such as pictures from the moon showing the Earth, do not show STARS in them? I man... we can see them here from Earth, so how come they can't take pictures of them in space? Maybe this is a long answered question, but I haven't recieved the answer. Perhaps it is because the camera's filter out the light of the other stars, or the reflecting light of the Earth causes the stars light to be too dim, kinda how if your in a city you can see less stars?


When astronauts take pictures from space, you will never see stars, except for our sun. This is because the cameras they use are not sensitive enough to pick up the light from stars, galaxies, nebulae, etc. If the astronauts had the camera exposed to the stars long enough, then some stars would be visible in the pictures they bring back.



posted on Jan, 24 2004 @ 01:02 PM
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Thanks for the replies. I've always wondered this and noone could ever give me the answer.



posted on Jan, 24 2004 @ 01:11 PM
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AND THE THIRD FACTOR IS: FOCUS

~^~
now, the Hubble space telescope FOCUSES on dim stars

not like astronauts Focusing on the large, bright object, just ahead

i heard, even your eyes see starlight clearer & sharper, if you don't look directly at the starlight source...something about rod & cones in the eyeball.



posted on Jan, 24 2004 @ 01:14 PM
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Yeah... i know what your talking about. I do believe it's right under Orion's Belt that I can see a cluster of stars, but If i look directly at it I can't see anythig. only in the perfect dark can I see them then.



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