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Viable real-world benefits of being a Mason

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posted on Sep, 23 2007 @ 07:41 PM
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Hello from a new member here. I've read on and off for a while now and I've a question directed to any Masons of any degree/order. I've been thinking about becoming a Mason for several years now but never committed to doing anything about it. I even made an appointment and met with a local lodge member who in turn gave me a tour of the building and we talked about the fraternity for an hour or so.

Here's my question - how real are the benefits of being a Mason in the sense of membership being advantageous in the business world or otherwise?

The reason I ask is because of my current situation. I'm 36, married, father of one (possibly two soon) and almost two years ago I left an extremely good job at a major software firm to pursue a lifelong passion for medicine. Currently, I'm attending a major university here in Colorado working on my med school pre-reqs (as well as a degree in neuroscience) while also working at our local hospital (ER, infectious disease and radiology rotations). As such my life is EXTREMELY busy. I've already got some huge pluses with two med schools (with regard to acceptance), but I'm always looking for a different angle or another advantage. I'm wondering if FreeMasonry will provide me with that.

If anyone can speak directly to that point, I would be greatly appreciative. I realize no one can give definitive answers, but I'm sure there must be opinions on the matter.

Lastly, I know that this isn't reason enough (if viable) to become a Mason. I would primarily pursue Masonry for the fraternity aspect and for many of the reasons that most of you here have. I simply want to know if the added benefit put to question above might be legitimate.

Thanks for your time and consideration.




posted on Sep, 23 2007 @ 08:40 PM
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reply to post by LushMojo
 


Please understand that if you request admission and are accepted, you will be required to state on your honor, previous to initiation, that you are not led to request initiation from "mercenary motives", which include business contacts, material gain, etc. You will then be required to affirm that your reason for requesting admission is due to a favorable opinion of the fraternity, and a desire for knowledge.

If you can honestly answer that you seek the mysteries of Freemasonry in a pursuit of knowledge, you will be welcomed among us. If you seek membership in an organization for business contacts and such things, organizations such as Rotary would be much more appropriate, and we would wish you well in that endeavor.



posted on Sep, 23 2007 @ 10:16 PM
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I have nothing but respect for the Freemasons. I would love to get involved but I don't think they have room enough for this scumbag. I especially like the roots associated with the first type of "workers union." I wish people would divert their energy to something that matters..



posted on Sep, 24 2007 @ 05:07 AM
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Originally posted by LushMojo

Here's my question - how real are the benefits of being a Mason in the sense of membership being advantageous in the business world or otherwise?

Based on the information in your post, I am going to suggest that Masonry is not for you. There is nothing wrong with seeking business contacts but not in lodge. It is unlikely that you would find any financial improvement due to being in lodge. It is far more likely that you would be donating frequently to supply poor children with coats or to the family of a brother who has died or fallen ill leaving them in financial distress etc.



posted on Sep, 24 2007 @ 08:26 AM
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Please reread my last paragraph. My primary intent would be to join for the fraternity itself (as well as knowledge - which is what I was implying by saying "and for many of the reasons that most of you here have."

I would NOT want to join simply to get the contacts benefit. I've read and heard many times about Masons observing a rule of preference for other brothers of the fraternity. I simply wanted to know how many Masons believe that to be valid. That's all I was asking.


Originally posted by Masonic Light
reply to post by LushMojo
 


Please understand that if you request admission and are accepted, you will be required to state on your honor, previous to initiation, that you are not led to request initiation from "mercenary motives", which include business contacts, material gain, etc. You will then be required to affirm that your reason for requesting admission is due to a favorable opinion of the fraternity, and a desire for knowledge.

If you can honestly answer that you seek the mysteries of Freemasonry in a pursuit of knowledge, you will be welcomed among us. If you seek membership in an organization for business contacts and such things, organizations such as Rotary would be much more appropriate, and we would wish you well in that endeavor.




posted on Sep, 24 2007 @ 08:28 AM
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I'm sorry.....are you referring to me as a "scumbag"? If so, why?


Originally posted by DeadFlagBlues
I have nothing but respect for the Freemasons. I would love to get involved but I don't think they have room enough for this scumbag. I especially like the roots associated with the first type of "workers union." I wish people would divert their energy to something that matters..



posted on Sep, 24 2007 @ 08:34 AM
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Are you a Mason?

I never said anything at all about "financial improvement." I stated explicitly that I was curious about benefits of being a Mason in terms of my application for med school.

As for as philanthropy, I have no issue with that at all. My wife and I give to a number of causes consistently. We're big believers in generosity. We know that we've been blessed in enormous ways and we always feel privileged to share with others. This would be another reason that I'd consider joining the Masons. So, I don't find that aspect negative at all.

Again, I'm not looking for "financial improvement". Frankly, I don't need any. I'm simply curious about joining the Masons for acceptable reasons and then subsequently finding a fringe benefit of being advantageous for med school (if and only if there were Masons on the application board - obviously).


Originally posted by RedPill

Originally posted by LushMojo

Here's my question - how real are the benefits of being a Mason in the sense of membership being advantageous in the business world or otherwise?

Based on the information in your post, I am going to suggest that Masonry is not for you. There is nothing wrong with seeking business contacts but not in lodge. It is unlikely that you would find any financial improvement due to being in lodge. It is far more likely that you would be donating frequently to supply poor children with coats or to the family of a brother who has died or fallen ill leaving them in financial distress etc.



posted on Sep, 24 2007 @ 08:45 AM
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reply to post by LushMojo
 


I would also try to meet with as many members of the Lodge that you can, at the very least the Worshipful Master and Wardens. I would even go so far as meet with members of different Lodges as they are not all the same.



posted on Sep, 24 2007 @ 08:49 AM
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Thank you for the aside. If I pursue this I would certainly want to meet as many men in the lodge as possible, including those who hold positions such as those you mentioned. However, if you're a Mason, could you please speak to my actual question.


Originally posted by befoiled
reply to post by LushMojo
 


I would also try to meet with as many members of the Lodge that you can, at the very least the Worshipful Master and Wardens. I would even go so far as meet with members of different Lodges as they are not all the same.



posted on Sep, 24 2007 @ 08:49 AM
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I joined for the coupons.



I got some nifty ringtones as well.


Seriously, at this point in history, most masons are elderly/retired, and won't have much in the way of social or business contacts at all. The younger members tend to be tradesmen rather than civic leaders. Which is fine with me.

.



posted on Sep, 24 2007 @ 08:54 AM
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reply to post by LushMojo
 


If I did not have a doctor, and I had a choice between new doctors whom I believed were equally skilled, and one was a Mason and the other was not, I would be more likely to choose the Mason as my physician. Same thing with any other thing I may need, whether it be an auto mechanic or a roofer.

I merely wanted to point out that this question should not be an influence on one's decision to request admission into the fraternity. I suppose I could put it this way: Let's say, hypothetically, that your becoming a Mason would not effect your educational goals or medical practice in any way, either for good or for bad. Would you still want to become a Mason?

It is possible that you will meet new patients and/or business contacts in the Lodge. It is also possible that you will not.



posted on Sep, 24 2007 @ 09:00 AM
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Yes, I would still possibly want to be a Mason regardless of my goal of being an MD. As I said, I've been considering this for quite some time now.

And again, perhaps I've not communicated my question well. I'm not concerned with a scenario like the one you mention (someone potentially picking me as their physician because we both happen to be Masons). My question is ONLY about whether or not my membership might be advantageous during med school applications.

I think I have my answer already though. In retrospect the question wasn't advisable here. Thanks for the replies.


Originally posted by Masonic Light
reply to post by LushMojo
 


If I did not have a doctor, and I had a choice between new doctors whom I believed were equally skilled, and one was a Mason and the other was not, I would be more likely to choose the Mason as my physician. Same thing with any other thing I may need, whether it be an auto mechanic or a roofer.

I merely wanted to point out that this question should not be an influence on one's decision to request admission into the fraternity. I suppose I could put it this way: Let's say, hypothetically, that your becoming a Mason would not effect your educational goals or medical practice in any way, either for good or for bad. Would you still want to become a Mason?

It is possible that you will meet new patients and/or business contacts in the Lodge. It is also possible that you will not.



posted on Sep, 24 2007 @ 09:03 AM
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Originally posted by LushMojo
Here's my question - how real are the benefits of being a Mason in the sense of membership being advantageous in the business world or otherwise?


If this is the question you are referring to I would point you back to my previous answer: It depends upon the Lodge. Thay are all different, demographically speaking. Some are superior to others.

I'll be honest with you though. If you plan to attend med school AND you have a family, you're not going to have a whole lot of time to spare for your new brethren or the craft.



posted on Sep, 24 2007 @ 09:05 AM
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Originally posted by LushMojo
My question is ONLY about whether or not my membership might be advantageous during med school applications.


As to the new question I would answer "probably not at all."



posted on Sep, 24 2007 @ 09:10 AM
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As for time, I've no worries. I would pursue all my degrees in Masonry before entering med school (next year). I have three friends in med school (all in different years) and with the current cap on how many hours med schools can require now things are quite different than even five years ago. I'll actually have more time available in my schedule when I'm in med school than I do now. Residency will be altogether different, but then, that won't last forever.

Where did you go to med school? You sound as if you speak from experience. Or are you simply conjecturing based on what you've read/heard?


Originally posted by befoiled

Originally posted by LushMojo
Here's my question - how real are the benefits of being a Mason in the sense of membership being advantageous in the business world or otherwise?


If this is the question you are referring to I would point you back to my previous answer: It depends upon the Lodge. Thay are all different, demographically speaking. Some are superior to others.

I'll be honest with you though. If you plan to attend med school AND you have a family, you're not going to have a whole lot of time to spare for your new brethren or the craft.



posted on Sep, 24 2007 @ 09:14 AM
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Originally posted by LushMojo


And again, perhaps I've not communicated my question well. I'm not concerned with a scenario like the one you mention (someone potentially picking me as their physician because we both happen to be Masons). My question is ONLY about whether or not my membership might be advantageous during med school applications.



I would say that your involvement in Freemasonry will not affect med school applications in any way, either positive or negative. For example, I was a already a Mason when I applied for entrance in a master's degree program and my fraternal standing in Freemasonry was irrelevant to my academic goals.



posted on Sep, 24 2007 @ 09:19 AM
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Originally posted by LushMojo
Where did you go to med school? You sound as if you speak from experience. Or are you simply conjecturing based on what you've read/heard?


My degree is in Zoology (herpetology). Several of my classmates went to to med school. One made it.

I was also a Master Mason and active in both the York and Scottish Rites.

If you're looking for someone with more experience to answer your questions, I will gladly bow out of this discussion.



posted on Sep, 24 2007 @ 09:21 AM
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Thank you. That's the sort of answer I was looking for (an actual answer from a Mason). I appreciate your candor. I know for a fact that two of the people on the applications board for my primary school are Masons. I'm still going to pursue Masonry, but now I know that I won't receive any special consideration for my membership. That doesn't sway my desire to be a Mason either way. I simply wanted to be informed

Thanks again. No other replies are necessary. I have what I need now.


Originally posted by Masonic Light

Originally posted by LushMojo


And again, perhaps I've not communicated my question well. I'm not concerned with a scenario like the one you mention (someone potentially picking me as their physician because we both happen to be Masons). My question is ONLY about whether or not my membership might be advantageous during med school applications.



I would say that your involvement in Freemasonry will not affect med school applications in any way, either positive or negative. For example, I was a already a Mason when I applied for entrance in a master's degree program and my fraternal standing in Freemasonry was irrelevant to my academic goals.



posted on Sep, 24 2007 @ 10:29 AM
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I know you think you will have time to balance Med School and Masonry but trust me with a family on top of that, that is too much on almost anyones plate. I am pursuing my Master's (degree in the education sense) right now and have had to take a break from my Masonic studies.

Sure if you get your degrees before you go to Med School that will help but you honestly won't get as much out of the Craft as you could; regardless of whether or not you are already a Master Mason. And you should also not limit yourself to saying "I will reach the third degree in a year," I personally took nearly 2 YEARS to progress from Entered Apprentice to Fellowcraft (something not common in many American lodges but was in mine) and feel that it was a wonderful decision so that you actually understand the esoteric meaning of everything you are studying.

I personally can not imagine going to Med School and having a family while simultaneously being new to Masonry.



posted on Sep, 25 2007 @ 04:15 PM
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I would say that joining for advancement is a mercenary motive, or idle curiosity,both of which you state that you are not joining the fraternity for, so if you are comfortable lying when you take an oath before God on the book that you hold to be his sacred law,then I would say that you aren't meant to be a Mason.




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