EMP Effect on Nuclear Reactors?

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posted on Sep, 22 2007 @ 10:35 AM
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In a major EMP event as predicted by many would it follow with a nuclear meltdown of every nuclear power plant within range? I understand it takes much time (days?) to shut down a reactor and that electrical power is required in the process. If the US was riddled with Chernobyls it would seem that all that is left would be invasion. Further attack would be pretty much pointless.




posted on Sep, 22 2007 @ 10:53 AM
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from what I understand All nuclear Power plants must be hardened against EMP as of 2003. So anything short of a direct hit will not harm them. they will how ever have to shut down rather quickly because other wise they will overload what is left of the electrical infrastructure.

Just for the record I did not get that information from any ware on the net. I had a friend who use to work for the power company who told me that. He is a fellow survivalist and we were talking about EMP preparedness. So in short it may be wrong I will do some more research.



posted on Sep, 22 2007 @ 11:05 AM
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Sounds reasonable AA. I tried to research it more before posting this. Didn't have much luck. I like that it made you think though and want to find out more.


Not having all the right answers can be greatly offset by having all the right questions. I like to make people think.



posted on Sep, 22 2007 @ 08:28 PM
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As far as I know, most reactors have some sort of mechanism designed to quickly stop the reactors. Many have graphite control rods that are gravity operated and the mechanisms that keep them from entering the core will automatically shut off in the event of an emergency, so the control rods automatically enter the reactor.



posted on Sep, 23 2007 @ 04:41 PM
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I thought EMP's effects would only last a few moments, at least thats what I have been taught from the oceans movies.

Seriously though would an emp really "fry or destroy" electronics or just merely interfere with them maybe erase magnetic drives?



posted on Sep, 23 2007 @ 06:47 PM
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Because research involves above ground detonations there is very little data available on the subject. As I understand it the last atmospheric nuclear detonation was over Johnston Island in 1962 and electrical disruption was experienced 700 miles away in Hawaii (incidentally I was stationed on Johnston Island in 1968-69). As far as I know it was a temporary disruption and I've heard no credible reports of permanent damage to electrical equipment. That was before the computer age though. I'm sure that the equipment that would be involved now would be a lot less forgiving.

It would seem that although fear and government scare tactics serve to exagerate those effects to some degree, it is still a real threat to consider. I'm just hard pressed to believe it will destroy everything electrical. The only problem is we have no choice but to allow for it. It's like y2k. The only way we'll know for sure what effect it will have will be after the fact.



posted on Sep, 23 2007 @ 06:58 PM
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All nuclear facilities were to be emp hardened by 2003. Yahoo emp. Apparently massive electronic damage is limited in area to blast, unless it is a specialized emp devise. Wiki has very good info on topic. Russian bombers were still using vaccuum tubes in the 60's as they are said to be much more impervious.



posted on Sep, 23 2007 @ 07:04 PM
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well looks like my friend told me accurate information. thats good to know because i have learned alot from him, about all different things



posted on Sep, 25 2007 @ 01:40 PM
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You'd probably have to touch off a nuke so close to the reactor that the idea whether the electronics inside would survive becomes a bit of a moot point.



posted on Sep, 25 2007 @ 01:44 PM
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Wayfarer, that is exactly what I read in the article. It would almost have to be a direct hit. It also said there are mechanical means to avoid a meltdown devoid of electrical power.



posted on Sep, 25 2007 @ 01:47 PM
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reply to post by jpm1602
 


Consider it a post of agreement.



posted on Sep, 30 2007 @ 06:04 AM
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Originally posted by lonemaverick
As far as I know, most reactors have some sort of mechanism designed to quickly stop the reactors. Many have graphite control rods that are gravity operated and the mechanisms that keep them from entering the core will automatically shut off in the event of an emergency, so the control rods automatically enter the reactor.


Look up the word SCRAM. Super Critical Reactor Axe Man. This is the emergency shut down proceedure for most reactor designs. It drops quickly the control rods into the fuel cells to stop the reaction.

I dont think so much the nuclear side of the house is the problem. I think it will be the electrical side of the house. The switchboards and computer monitoring abilities. If one loses control of the electrical side of the house it will by default shut down the reactor as one cannot get the correct voltage or current capabilities to keep running. SCRAM!!





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