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Question for any Masons here

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posted on Sep, 19 2007 @ 04:57 PM
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I am curious about the Lodges views on "Alternate" Religions, such as Wicca, Buddhism, Taoism, ect. Are they considered "valid" along with Christianity and are the practitioners allowed to join?

Thank you for all help on this.




posted on Sep, 19 2007 @ 05:01 PM
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Thats an individual thing not a position dictated by the organisation. I for example am very much into spiritual stuff while other masons couldnt care less or even disagree with it. Contrary to religious cults such as christianity, there are places and spaces were diversity of opinion is not frowned upon.



posted on Sep, 19 2007 @ 05:06 PM
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Most lodges require that you believe in God to join, there are no other specific religious requirements. The religious opinions of each lodge member vary as much as the rest of the population. As we do not speak of our religion in lodge, I could be sitting next to a Hindu or Buddhist and not know it.



posted on Sep, 20 2007 @ 08:19 AM
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Originally posted by PLaprad
I am curious about the Lodges views on "Alternate" Religions, such as Wicca, Buddhism, Taoism, ect. Are they considered "valid" along with Christianity and are the practitioners allowed to join?

Thank you for all help on this.


The Fraternity does not question its Candidates for admission, nor its Adepts, as to their personal religious beliefs except for the requirement that they believe in a Supreme Being. Some Buddhists and Taoists are atheists, and therefore this would prohibit them from joining Freemasonry, which is a theistic society. However, if a Buddhist or Taoist also believes in God, they have met the only religious requirement for initiation.

Wicca is similar, in that many Wiccans see the various gods and goddesses of the polytheistic systems to be different aspects of one Supreme Being. If this is the case, they may be admitted.



posted on Sep, 20 2007 @ 04:35 PM
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Well it's not discussed to much. However I have yet to see any negative feelings on those. The great thing on Masonry is they are very open and understanding to the need of individuality. Please most that dive in head first tend to study many religions at least in my case and many I have met.

As far as atheists not admitted. AS far as multiple gods I am not sure really.. I always took it as one supreme being. I suppose if the other gods would lead up to a main god or multiple gods equaled one god or parts of a god head.

I will look in my constitution later tonight to see if it addresses it more in depth.

Plapard: Alternative religions are very much accepted. The main thing is you believe in a supreme being.



posted on Sep, 20 2007 @ 07:09 PM
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Originally posted by PLaprad
I am curious about the Lodges views on "Alternate" Religions, such as Wicca, Buddhism, Taoism, ect. Are they considered "valid" along with Christianity and are the practitioners allowed to join?

Thank you for all help on this.

Hi PLapred

Just to split hairs and answer your question literally, Freemasonry (I assume you mean the organization itself when you refer to the 'lodge') has no opinion whatsoever on any religion, alternative or not.

It regards the choice of deity to be a supremely personal decision and none of the organization's business, other than the basic belief requirements as well explained above.



posted on Sep, 20 2007 @ 07:18 PM
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What kind of literature exists? I know nothing about masons, I know some books are secret and holy.



posted on Sep, 20 2007 @ 07:29 PM
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reply to post by johngardner1
 


Here's a website that lists lots of really good masonic books if your looking for some fascinating reading.

www.masonicworld.com...


As far as secret and holy books, There are no "secret" books as far as I know. The only "holy" book is the book that is upon the altar when lodge is opened and you swear upon when you take your degrees. This book can differ from lodge to lodge, depending on location.

edit: I forgot to add the link.

[edit on 20-9-2007 by GAOTU789]



posted on Sep, 21 2007 @ 09:04 AM
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Originally posted by johngardner1
What kind of literature exists? I know nothing about masons, I know some books are secret and holy.


There aren't any "secret" Masonic books. All Masonic books are available to the public, can be found in large public libraries, or can be ordered online.

Some have claimed that Pike's "Morals and Dogma" was secret due to the fact that early editions has a disclaimer that the book be returned to the local Temple upon the death of the owner. However, this was not because the book was secret, but because they wanted to save money on printing, and could give the used book out again. This really didn't work out, so the disclaimer was eventually dropped.

Here are some very good books on Freemasonry:

"The Builders" by Joseph Fort Newton
"The Mens House" by Joseph Fort Newton
"A Comprehensive View of Freemasonry" by Henry Wilson Coil
"Morals and Dogma" by Albert Pike
"Jurisprudence of Freemasonry" by Albert G. Mackey



posted on Sep, 21 2007 @ 10:29 AM
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Well taht 's all fine and dandy if you're a male- otherwise it's Eastern Star or Co Masons for you my little gal. Tried it paid my 75$ wrote out extensive explanation to their application. Decided to be direct and truthful sinc ethey claim to be an istitution for human growth. got the call back from the Grand master of Co- masonary- love to have you , expect one minor flaw. My grandfather was a 32 nd mason (alcoholic abuser) , my uncles all masons (good men). Frankly they were being evaluated on their response to my honesty. they failed- preferred members keep their 'faults' to themselves - otherwise it may be something they have to help you grow through. Talk the Talk, Can't walk the walk. But they invited me back as soon as I quit that pesky little habit.
I've spent my life in the service of man and beast and yet I'm not worthy of their inclusion. Read their philosophy and mission statement and see if it jives with their practices. Origianlly in Scotland Masonary was Free- women included, now it's just a bunch of good ol' boys.
The mere fact they ask these personal questions that amount to nothing is to judge and thus not a Free society. Theres been stories throughtout history questioning their motives or protecting their name. I think the attention is unwarranted- they're just another group of people trying to raise their social status by affiliation, not good works, not inclusion into the brotherhood of man, nor enlightenment.
Your nothing more that an older version of the Lions, Elks, Moose, Eagles
I'm looking now for a group that will put me to work and use what ever talents I possess to improve the human, animal and ecological condition. Lofty intellectualism has long since passed, probably the last great contribution was the American Revolution- since then , not so much.



posted on Sep, 21 2007 @ 11:57 AM
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I don't know much about Co-Masonry or their laws, but I do know this:

The purpose of initiation is to transform the Candidate. The purpose is *not* for the Candidate to try to transform the Order.

I don't know what your "pesky little habit" is, and it's none of my business anyway. But you said that they invited you for initiation if you gave it up, and you refused. Therefore, I think they made the right call, as they consider your "habit" to be an obstacle to authentic initiation. Instead of complaining about their decision, why not contemplate the reason you were denied? It's all about priorities, and if Initiation becomes *your* priority, you may begin to see things differently.

[edit on 21-9-2007 by Masonic Light]



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