Twenty Minutes To Button Up

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posted on Sep, 21 2007 @ 02:44 PM
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worldwatcher up until recently I had never given this much consideration. I am realizing that since I am the one who is home the most amount of hours it would likely fall to me to close up my house. I would definately go and get my child from school and I know it would take ten full minutes. I'd fill not only the bathtub (after taping the drain) but I'd also fill the washing machine and then turn it off before it agitated. I'd fill big ice chests too. If I could I'd drape plastic sheeting over anything filled with water. I need to cut plastic sheeting to the right sizes before hand and I have also thought about sanitation. I don't have a camp potty but I've improvised for that as well. My list of preparations to make is a bit too lengthy and I don't have enough things planned out yet so I'll have to streamline and prioritize.
Jules




posted on Sep, 21 2007 @ 03:42 PM
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20 minutes?

ok...if I'm caught at home:

1:
run bath to fill with water and gaffa-tape plastic shower curtain over the full bath

2:
erect 3-man dome-tent in cellar by exterior wall as inner-shelter, drag washine machine and tumble-dryer either side of tent and lay several 3x3in timbers that are in cellar over the top of machines as hard-bracing

3:
drag all tinned/bottled items from kitchen fridge&pantry into tent

4:
switch-off interior&exterior gas and water supply stop-cocks

5:
unplug laptop and PC/peripherals, drag into tent, wrap in blankets, and then wrap all that in modelling fine-grade chicken-wire as a makeshift faraday cage

6:
unplug all electrical connections from sockets in house

7:
dive into tent with BoB kit, shovel, radio, torch, and cat and zip up and prepare to kiss my ass goodbye

...just about achievable in 20mins

If caught whilst at uni:

Run to the library, head for a corner aisle on the ground floor, and push-over a bookshelf or two against the wall as a lean-to and pile on as many books as possible for hard-cover shelter

[edit on 21-9-2007 by citizen smith]



posted on Sep, 21 2007 @ 08:16 PM
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You should check out this recent movie trailer - seems like Hollywood is already answering your question...

Right at Your Door



posted on Sep, 21 2007 @ 08:53 PM
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20 minutes... Let's make the assumption a nuke went off in my city. If I survived and consider I have the luxury of working where I live, so going home is not an issue....

That would give me time to set up some radiac equipment I have. Already have some water and food in place. Communications and power is already taken care of. If I survived the blast damage and home didn't catch fire, we'd be okay.

If nuke went off downwind and I had several hours, not a problem at all, seriously. I'm kind of a survivalist nut at heart and have many neat and cool toys for all kinds of misadventures. My kids think I'm eccentric, but I'm giving all four of them Geiger counters and dosimeters with chargers for Xmas, yeah, there be some spending money tossed in, but it's the thought that counts.

A prudent person should consider what the comfort levels they have for different situations and make plans accordingly.



posted on Sep, 21 2007 @ 09:10 PM
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my 20 mins to button up:

i live on the west coast. i'm hoping the on-shore wind will keep the radiation away because there isn't much we can do in this little cottage in the woods.



posted on Oct, 2 2007 @ 09:52 AM
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20 minutes to button up

how did you find out about this news
if it came over the tv/radio
then everyone else knows too
head for the basement
because you've already pre-planned for this, right
start with your basement, pick a corner and make a shelter
big enough for your family and supplies for 5 (?) days

if you got a phone call from someone " in the know "
i would think about jumping in the car and making a run for it
no speeding, and you've already scouted out escape routes
and see how far you can get in 20 minutes
( give yourself 15 minutes )

if you're still driving and you see the big light/mushroom
because you've already scouted your area 5-10 miles out
you know where any possible abandoned houses/businesses are
something that can withstand the coming shockwave
after the shockwave, if your vehicle is still mobile ( EMP )
i'd get back in the car, and keep going for another hour
depends if you're downwind or not

if we're talking about biological / gas
go to a paint store
buy some of those one piece plastic coveralls ( 2 per person )
plastic gloves
and definitely the best masks you can find
if a gas attack is Phosgene ( used in WW1 )
go to the highest place in your house
Phosgene hugs the ground

research, planning and asking yourself " what if ? "



posted on Oct, 2 2007 @ 05:36 PM
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first of all would the goverment tell the truth or make it seem like it wasn't a major thing to keep people who had a real chance for surviving from panicking. nuke odds are not surviable without extensive planning ahead of time. chemical odds are if you can get into a building with large enough volume and cut off the ventilation system and seal up the openings you should be able to survive an air borne attack. biological attack if you can get to a secure air tight sarea you probably would survive. nuke is so much harder because of the fallout taking so long to be safe . chemical or biological attack would probably go inert in 24 to 48 hours .



posted on Oct, 6 2007 @ 11:33 AM
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Originally posted by proteus33
first of all would the goverment tell the truth or make it seem like it wasn't a major thing to keep people who had a real chance for surviving from panicking.


So our only real alarm will be every rich person flying to Denver International Airport at the same time.

One thing to note, Iodine sucks up radiation, make sure you got Iodine pills so your body is topped off if you get low rad exposure. Radiation concentrations in the thyroid are a common post radiation effect.

If you are topped off, no new iodine you get from food will get stored.





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