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Return of the Coelacanth

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posted on Sep, 15 2007 @ 02:00 PM
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So,I am reading about the Coelacanth being caught in more and more places after being thought extinct. Is it possible that a bunch of them were caught in the polar ice when it formed,and now that it is melting they are being released? Fish are cold-blooded,and can survive being frozen alive,right?




posted on Sep, 15 2007 @ 02:08 PM
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It was only thought extinct because nobody actually went looking for it or bothered asking the fishermen.

As soon as the fishermen knew they were going to get paid big money for them they began reporting them.

As for your 'frozen in ice' idea, that doesnt work as these fish only live in relatively warm seas.



posted on Sep, 15 2007 @ 02:21 PM
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reply to post by Chorlton
 

Thanks Chorlton. But wasn't the first known one caught in the arctic? I can't remember.



posted on Sep, 15 2007 @ 02:23 PM
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reply to post by Sadet
 


First one caught was in the Indian ocean.



posted on Sep, 16 2007 @ 07:28 AM
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The first catch was actually in South Africa, in the Chalumna River. The residents had caught them several times but found that the Coelacanth weren't prime eating material. They are a protected species now, with programs in place to preserve the fish.



posted on Sep, 16 2007 @ 10:19 AM
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Originally posted by Sadet
So,I am reading about the Coelacanth being caught in more and more places after being thought extinct. Is it possible that a bunch of them were caught in the polar ice when it formed,and now that it is melting they are being released? Fish are cold-blooded,and can survive being frozen alive,right?

Being cold-blooded has nothing to do with being able to be frozen down. For that to happen, the cells in the creatures has to have developed anti-freezing proteins and specialised lipids in their cell-membranes, to assure that cells doesnt explode, when frozen. Water cooled down below 0°C, turns into ice-crystals and widen, thereby expanding cells.
For a creature to be able to be frozen down, it has to be very highly developed in this way, and it is not many creatures that are able. On top of that, those that are capable of it, tend to die after relatively few years if they arent unfrozen.
Fish that have these special proteins and lipids, are usually those that live in very cold water, or at very low levels, such as several kilometers under the surface.




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