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Thruster May Shorten Mars Trip from 6 Months to 1 Week

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posted on Sep, 11 2007 @ 04:46 AM
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This is great news! It sounds really promising if they fund his research. Just don't be surprised if after he invents this technology for the government he mysteriously disappears. Why pay royalties on a patent when you can just take them for yourself after you get rid of the patent holder? At least that's the way some of these bastards will see it.




posted on Sep, 11 2007 @ 09:16 AM
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Finally tourism to mars might happen....it's about time we venture onto and establish a permanent colony on mars.



posted on Sep, 11 2007 @ 09:27 AM
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reply to post by Postal76
 



Maybe I missed it, but which post alluded to near light speed velocities?
Lightspeed is considerably faster than 100km/sec.



posted on Sep, 11 2007 @ 10:02 AM
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I'm wondering how this "accelerator" will deal with gains in mass at near light speed?



posted on Sep, 11 2007 @ 10:13 AM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 


Hey Soylent Green Is People, awhile back we thought that the human body couldnt go past 30mph, people were terrified of fast trains, now we go hundreads in planes. But i guess you do have a good point.

Take Care, Vix



posted on Sep, 11 2007 @ 11:10 AM
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That is absolutly amazing. This is wonderful news. Will we see a manned mission to Mars sometime in the nearish future? I sure hope so.



posted on Sep, 11 2007 @ 11:16 AM
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1g acceleration would be ideal for human physiology and just like sitting in your lounge at home. At that rate it would take about a year to reach near light speed and allowing an equivalent deceleration rate of 1g would allow a distance of some 9.2 x 10^15 metres to be covered with no abnormal stresses on the occupants (that's over 60000 astronomical units in just 2 years).

Imagine loading the fuel tank & pantry for a trip to the nearest star even at that leisurely pace



posted on Sep, 11 2007 @ 12:06 PM
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Originally posted by Vixion
reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 


Hey Soylent Green Is People, awhile back we thought that the human body couldnt go past 30mph, people were terrified of fast trains, now we go hundreads in planes. But i guess you do have a good point.

Take Care, Vix


You're right about the changing perceptions about what speed a body can endure -- but the SPEED isn't the problem, it's the ACCELERATION. The space shuttle and ISS are free-falling at 17,000 mph, and that's OK for the astronauts because that speed is CONSTANT. However, the initial acceleration (lift-off) and decelaration (re-entry) are quite jarring to their bodies.

But like I said earlier -- (with the help of '"looofo's" acceleration calculations) and as 'pilgrum' has just pointed out above -- maybe future spacecraft designers can use a constant rate of acceleration and deceleration to produce artificial 1-g environments aboard the spacecraft during the "cruise" portion of a trip to Mars and beyond.



posted on Sep, 11 2007 @ 12:27 PM
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A Question !!

If say , we attain the proposed speed of not quite the speed of light , and send some real brave blokes out there and get them to this speed, is there a computer powerful enough and fast enough to calculate a course and quick enough also to miss any objects or even dust that just happens along the way ??

And would not some shield be required ?

And if Vix looks as good as her avatar im moving to Corbridge lol

Regards
Git

[edit on 11-9-2007 by completenuttergit]



posted on Sep, 11 2007 @ 12:32 PM
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What's going to keep the shuttle/ship from colliding with larger objects at this speed? Such as asteroids, meteors? Are they just going to calculate distance of an object and where it will be when they thrust? Sounds dangerous.


hmm a little late on my question, you beat me!

[edit on 11-9-2007 by NateNute]



posted on Sep, 11 2007 @ 12:41 PM
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reply to post by NateNute
 


Well You know what they say!! great minds and all that !

But even dust at that speed would puncture holes in any fuselage surely!

Regards

Git



posted on Sep, 11 2007 @ 01:13 PM
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I have to put a damper on this article by Bae. It always seems to promise something but in the end you never hear of it again. Please do not say the Government, because afterall if you read what the other scientist had to say he did not say "Wow" we finally done it, he said it was interesting. Afterall I keep reading this stuff coming out about what a particular person is doing, and that is usually the end of it. It made no mention of moving anything just that it had some force behind it. There is a difference and that all it ever seemed to be -- hype about some experiment, but when practical applications for it come about, you never hear of it again. Why? Because in the end, there is no way to use it for anything practical.

Damper!



posted on Sep, 11 2007 @ 01:24 PM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 


As suggested by a previous poster, the acceleration the craft will experience on it's trip to Mars is less than 1 g. I'd be more concerned about the g-forces involved in getting to the craft with this new drive system. I doubt they'll build a ship with that drive that takes off from the planet. In all likelihood it'll be docked in orbit and some kind of shuttle will ferry people from the surface.

Edit to add: the human body can typically withstand 5 g of forward acceleration.

[edit on 11-9-2007 by Beachcoma]



posted on Sep, 11 2007 @ 01:36 PM
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Here's another little tid-bit from another article

Photonic Laser Thruster Demonstrated, Could Accelerate Spacecraft to Near-Light Speeds


The technology works by bouncing protons between mirrors and using a photon beam amplification system. The technology could be used to accelerate spacecraft to near light speed and to create space telescopes with 100,000 times better resolution.

The technology prototype generates the power of an industrial or military laser from from an egg sized head. The technology is economical and has been confirmed by repeated experiments. The institute is seeking funding to scale up the project.



It is true that a lot of inventions/technologies like this one seem to just disappear into a blackhole and are never heard from again, but let's just hope that "that" doesn't happen this time.



posted on Sep, 11 2007 @ 01:50 PM
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by next month, this technology will be lost in obscurity. within 6 months, brief notes released by NASA or the government [international community too] will claim the device and experiments were flawed.
within 5 years, Nasa will develop less advanced propulsion system that allows a trip to Mars in 3 months.
within 5 years, All focus on the moon will shift. [despite newly found interest from russia and china space programs.] *



posted on Sep, 11 2007 @ 01:51 PM
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Originally posted by omi_kron_gravitron

[despite newly found interest from russia and china space programs.] *



Let's hope they will pick it up instead. For the future of humanity lies in space.



posted on Sep, 11 2007 @ 02:33 PM
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Originally posted by Soylent Green Is People
reply to post by looofo
 


Well, I'm not an expert either...that's why I asked the question


If your calculations are correct, then that is good news! Thanks.



EDIT: Not to beat a dead horse, but I got to thinking...I assume the acceleration has to be more than 1g (not 2/3g -- although 2/3g may be correct for the deceleration). So would the acceleration feel like 1.5g? (the recprocal of 2/3)...1.5g does not sound bad, but what would the affects of 1.5g be for 3 1/2 days of constant acceleration. I would think a body would not like to feel 1.5g for 88 straight hours. I assume it would be a little hard to breathe. Maybe the answer would be a short acceleration time with greater g-forces.

The ISS and the space shuttle are in a free-fall at a constant speed of 17,000 mph +/-, and it's that constant speed that gives the astronauts a feeling of zero-g's.

Maybe they could use the acceleartion of this new propulsion system to create an artificial gravity environment.

I'm not criticizing your computations...I'm just wondering what it all means to human physiology.

[edit on 9/10/2007 by Soylent Green Is People]


No, the acceleration is the equivalent of 2/3g. The astronaut would only weight 2/3 of his normal weight. It's like an artificial gravity. But this is only true as long as the spaceship accelerates. The astronaut would feel better than at home.
At half the way, when the spaceship is going to decelerate it would cruise at 504000km/h!!! (v=at). That is the big problem. As said by other users here, you need a damn good shield.



posted on Sep, 11 2007 @ 02:50 PM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 


Maybe the astronauts would be encased in some kind of gel meant to protect the human body from the affects of acceleration and deceleration in space. I think some sort of technology like that is used in on of Arthur C. Clarke's novels. Can't remember which right now, though. Maybe his Rama series?



posted on Sep, 11 2007 @ 02:53 PM
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Acceleration and de-acceleration would not be my concern.........what type of damage would occur at those speeds by the smallest piece of debris.

Currently it is said that paint chips in orbit can severly damage satillites, whihc would be traveling much slower.



posted on Sep, 11 2007 @ 03:09 PM
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Found an article that describes how this PLT works.

Photonic Thruster Pulses Into Existence



Laser light emerges from both top and bottom of the photonic thruster, keeping it stationary as it pushes outward against spacecraft.

"Our approach to photonic laser propulsion is based on forming an active resonant optical cavity between two high-reflectance mirrors located separately in two space platforms," said Bae. "The breakthrough is in the fact that the laser gain medium in PLP is located within the optical cavity, in contrast to the previous failed attempts at passive resonant cavities, in which the laser gain medium was located outside the optical cavity."



I can't say that I fully understand all of this, so I thought I'd post this for others to comment on.

What I gather out of this (I may be wrong) is that the launch platform stays stationary and shoots a laser at the other spacecraft propelling it forward.

How accurate could they keep this laser to keep propelling the other spacecraft and after what distance would it become (if it would) to weak to push the "spacecraft?

[edit on 11/9/07 by Keyhole]



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