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Salt water as fuel?

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posted on Sep, 10 2007 @ 06:49 AM
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Salt water as fuel?


www.post-gazette.com

For obvious reasons, scientists long have thought that salt water couldn't be burned.

So when an Erie man announced he'd ignited salt water with the radio-frequency generator he'd invented, some thought it a was a hoax.

John Kanzius, a Washington County native, tried to desalinate seawater with a generator he developed to treat cancer, and it caused a flash in the test tube.
(visit the link for the full news article)



[edit on 10-9-2007 by UM_Gazz]




posted on Sep, 10 2007 @ 06:49 AM
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Now this is really interesting. If true it could possibly change everything.



[edit on 10-9-2007 by grover]



posted on Sep, 10 2007 @ 06:56 AM
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Is this another "cold fusion" let down or is he really on to something? That was the first thing that went through my mind as I read the article.



posted on Sep, 10 2007 @ 07:54 AM
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Just read about this on another site, is very interesting indeed!
I always thought that there must be an efficient way to release and burn the hydrogen in water and this may well be it! If this does turn out to be feasable then it could have major positive consequences for the world!!! And I just love it when a breakthrough is made accidentally.



posted on Sep, 10 2007 @ 08:04 AM
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untill i see the energy equation for this , i am very skeptical

i have seen it before , several months back - and still no figures are given

just looking at the scale of the demonstration makes me suspicious of its actual potential

there is a lot of apparatus [ hooked to mains electric supply ] - to produce a tiny flame which will drive a model engine , how many wats is that flywheel in the demonstation capable of delivering ??

unless the process is powered by solar , wind or wave powered electric generators it will not be clean .

PS - a last thought the flame colour troubles me

hydrogen / oxygen burns a pale blue - almost colourless each year several woprker injuries are caused by people sticking thier hand or another body part in a oxy-hydrogen cutting flame

why is this flame red ?????????

the ' obvious ' answer is sodium - which gives an orange flame

i thought this was " clean " ??

you already have a sodium oxide elfulent component to deal with

ok sodium oxide isnt toxic or enviromentally damaging

but where is the clorine going ? that is a very dangerous gas [ used as a war agent in WWI ]

and many of its oxides`are not much better wiki index

strange how no one mentions this isnt it ????

i only studdied chemistry to "A level " , and i knew all that without looking it up

why have none of the chenmists / engineers who supposedly lookd at this mentioned such obvious drawbacks ????

thats my opinion - a party trick of no or limited practucal use

[edit on 10-9-2007 by ignorant_ape]



posted on Sep, 10 2007 @ 08:56 AM
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The only chemistry I know is how to mix a bloody Mary or a margarita which I why I just said it was interesting.



posted on Sep, 10 2007 @ 09:05 AM
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reply to post by grover
 


That's not chemistry, that's mixology. Awesome name!

On topic, wasn't this posted here a few days back?



posted on Sep, 10 2007 @ 09:41 AM
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reply to post by Beachcoma
 


You've never had my bloody mary's




posted on Sep, 10 2007 @ 11:02 AM
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My take on it is that it's well known how much energy is required to separate a hydrogen atom from water. There are more and less efficient ways to do this, but you are still going to have to supply at least that much energy to free that hydrogen.

You can't get more than that out of it when you burn the hydrogen.

So at best, what he may have found is a more efficient means of electrolysis of the water. That by itself would be a wonderful discovery. But it wouldn't be OU.

I really loved the little demonstration with the Stirling engine. "Look, it turns a motor!!" You can take the same one and run it from a cup of coffee. Now, maybe I should go on youtube with a video of my little coffee cup Stirling and claim "Look, I can take coffee energy and run a motor! It's obviously a step on the way to free energy!"



posted on Sep, 10 2007 @ 11:29 PM
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Originally posted by Tom Bedlam
My take on it is that it's well known how much energy is required to separate a hydrogen atom from water. There are more and less efficient ways to do this, but you are still going to have to supply at least that much energy to free that hydrogen.

You can't get more than that out of it when you burn the hydrogen.

So at best, what he may have found is a more efficient means of electrolysis of the water.


I never really thought about that! I knew you could extract hydrogen from H2O using electrolysis of water, but didn't think of how much energy was required in comparison to what would be gained. Thanks for bringing it to my attention.



posted on Sep, 11 2007 @ 02:34 PM
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Don't get me wrong though, a really efficient electrolysis cell would be worth its weight in gold.

The thing would be a breakthrough if that's all you got from it.

I asked Dr Roy about it, I don't know if he'll have time to reply. Who knows, if he seems interested maybe we can get him to visit ATS and comment on it.



posted on Sep, 11 2007 @ 02:41 PM
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FYI this topic has been discussed many times here at ATS.

Here are two recent examples:

www.abovetopsecret.com...
www.abovetopsecret.com...
.



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