what a hell is roger?

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posted on Jan, 18 2004 @ 03:58 PM
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i don't know if this is the right place to ask but i always hear "Roger That" like confirmation, can anyone please tell me what does ROGER mean?




posted on Jan, 18 2004 @ 04:06 PM
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do'h! never mind! sorry not native english speaker



posted on Jan, 18 2004 @ 04:08 PM
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The origin of this phrase, which means "Yes, O.K., I understand you" dates back to the earliest days of wireless communication, when the Morse code letter R (dit-dah-dit) was used to indicate "O.K.--understood." As communications advanced to include voice capabilities, the military alpha code (Able, Baker, Charlie, etc.) was used as a logical extension of such single character responses. R=Roger=understood.

Of course, you always hear "Roger, Wilco, Over and Out" in terse military dramas. The additional verbiage means (Wilco) "Will Comply", (Over) "Message Complete--Reply Expected", and (Out) "Message Complete--No Reply Expected".



posted on Jan, 18 2004 @ 04:12 PM
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Roger is voice code for the letter R which has been historically used to signify "received" (i.e. ok).

Roger Wilso stands for R (received) and Will Comply.

So "Roger that" is I have received that message - ok.



posted on Jan, 18 2004 @ 04:12 PM
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I cannot comment on military usage of airwaves but when it comes to others usage such as police, ambulances etc., and private organizations I do have knowledge (I was a communications tech for number of years).

In the non-military realm this excess verbage is actually rarely used. Being seen as unnecessary. Mind you coding is used for various purposes and emergency broadcasts etc., do have a certain protocol.

A lot of the jargon that is referred to is often the realm of the Citizen's Band ilk for their own amusement it seems.

[Edited on 18-1-2004 by THENEO]



posted on Jan, 18 2004 @ 04:16 PM
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It's my name. I always answer to it.
Mine is spelled differently though. Like the Dodgers.
Over, and out.



posted on Jan, 18 2004 @ 04:27 PM
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Acutally The Word code for R is actually Romeo.

That's the phonetic for it anyway.

Chris



posted on Jan, 18 2004 @ 05:24 PM
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Some neanderthals use it as a term meaning 'having sex with' (Not relevant to the thread, I know, but an amusing aside nevertheless).



posted on Jan, 18 2004 @ 05:24 PM
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There appears to be an alternative meaning to Rodger as well.

Such as "She's so uptight she needs a jolly good rodgering!"

www.phillytown.com...
rodgering - British slang expression for the old "slap and tickle."

Coincidently we had a computer tech called rodger who seemed to mess things up on the network. So when it went down the cry would go up "Has the network been rodgered again!"

A thread discussing the act of rodgering...
www.creationmatrix.com...

An act suggested to North Koreas leader "That being said i still think we should bend Kim over a post and give him a thorough round rodgering."
www.command-post.org...



posted on Jan, 18 2004 @ 06:29 PM
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Originally posted by OzChris
Acutally The Word code for R is actually Romeo.

That's the phonetic for it anyway.

Chris


That's military. This comes from radiophone operators...it is different - Able, Baker, Charlie. And R was used in Morse code for "received" or "OK".

[Edited on 18-1-2004 by Valhall]



posted on Jan, 18 2004 @ 06:56 PM
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Originally posted by Netchicken
There appears to be an alternative meaning to Rodger as well.

Such as "She's so uptight she needs a jolly good rodgering!"

www.phillytown.com...
rodgering - British slang expression for the old "slap and tickle."

Coincidently we had a computer tech called rodger who seemed to mess things up on the network. So when it went down the cry would go up "Has the network been rodgered again!"


Wow, bizarre. I'm a computer tech named Rodger and I love to do the old slap & tickle !!



posted on Jan, 18 2004 @ 07:57 PM
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Val,

See there's the wierd thing....

I work for a mob Called Volunteer Marine Rescue and we use..

Alpha, Bravo, Charlie, Delta , Echo, Foxtrot etc....

Not the military version.... but i reckon IT IS SPASTIC..... having two forms of the phonetics..

Chris.



posted on Jan, 18 2004 @ 08:00 PM
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Yeah...exactly.

I think this is part of the reason so many died on the Titanic...

lol

I'm serious. There was no standardized calls and just around the time of the Titanic disaster they had decided on SOS...but the radio operators weren't used to it yet and were sending out the old call...can't remember what it was. Something like MSC or some nonsense.



posted on Jan, 18 2004 @ 08:48 PM
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# we hit a big ICEBERG... come Help us quick before we all turn into icecubes would have worked just as good.

chris



posted on Jan, 18 2004 @ 08:53 PM
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OK...I gotta step in..lol...I am ex military and a civil pilot..
most civil orgs go with alpha bravo charlie as does the military however there are a few words that seem to be rather local to these organizations...interchangeable so to speak...but back to the original post,...
quote;
"ORIGINS OF ROGER WILCO

Incidentally according to the Morris Dictionary of Word and Phrase Origins by William and Mary Morris(Harper Collins, New York, 1977, 1988). ROGER -- "in the meaning of 'Yes, O.K., I understand you -- is voice code for the letter R. It is part of the 'Able, Baker, Charlie' code known and used by all radiophone operators in the services in the 40's - 50's. " end quote
www.ac6v.com...



posted on Jan, 18 2004 @ 09:54 PM
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Originally posted by OzChris
# we hit a big ICEBERG... come Help us quick before we all turn into icecubes would have worked just as good.

chris


OzChris...I'm with you...

Also, a very effective phrase could have been "save my ass, I'm drowning!"



posted on Jan, 18 2004 @ 10:04 PM
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Actually a better one would be...

"HELP!!!! We are getting rodgered by an iceburg!!!"





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