2015 NASA interstellar mission

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posted on Jan, 18 2004 @ 02:51 PM
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I was just wondering why the name \"space 2015\" when I remembered an artical in PopSci about BPP (Breakthrough Propultion Phisics) where an interstellar mission that NASA is hoping to launch in 2015 was mentioned

So does someone of you have more info on it

I personally hope it\'s true




posted on Jan, 18 2004 @ 03:00 PM
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i believe they intend to send a man to mars around then... but other than that i havnt heard of anything



posted on Jan, 18 2004 @ 03:03 PM
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Interstellar? What did they mean by this? Further exploration of the milky way I assue.



posted on Jan, 18 2004 @ 03:12 PM
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I think a probe to the nearest star



posted on Jan, 18 2004 @ 03:19 PM
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Alpha Centauri? is it not the nearest star?



posted on Jan, 18 2004 @ 03:20 PM
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I just found that article in other room and it says in "25 years" sorry for the incorrect info the magasine is freom 2001



posted on Jan, 18 2004 @ 03:22 PM
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it doesn't say to which star but it's logical to assume that it's the nearest one



posted on Jan, 18 2004 @ 03:33 PM
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I'm trying to remember the name of the star that they believed was closeby yet also likely to have planets in it's orbit?

Since the methods being used to detect planets are rather crude so far it maybe that Alpha Centauri does indeed have planets revolving it too.



posted on Jan, 18 2004 @ 04:10 PM
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aren't there any statements from NASA about something like that I really hope that such a mission is possible in the nearest future



posted on Jan, 18 2004 @ 04:22 PM
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Originally posted by THENEO
Alpha Centauri? is it not the nearest star?


2nd nearest (Rigel Kentarus or A. Centauri). Proxima Centauri, which is in the Alpha and Beta Centauri star system, is the closest star to Earth, out side of our sun.



posted on Jan, 18 2004 @ 04:28 PM
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Originally posted by TheConservative

Originally posted by THENEO
Alpha Centauri? is it not the nearest star?


2nd nearest (Rigel Kentarus or A. Centauri). Proxima Centauri, which is in the Alpha and Beta Centauri star system, is the closest star to Earth, out side of our sun.


Thanks, I did in fact confirm this not knowing that Alpha Centauri system was in total 3 stars.



posted on Jan, 18 2004 @ 06:14 PM
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Since the Voyager probes have left our solar system, I guess we can say that NASA already has an " inter-stellar " mission. No ? Yes ?



posted on Jan, 18 2004 @ 06:19 PM
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^ We could say that.

Interstellar travel is travel between star systems. Since Voyager is outside of our solar system and headed for the stars, we can say this.



posted on Jan, 19 2004 @ 01:30 AM
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Then I like a new mision for nasa... trying to catch up with it so they have to redifine physics and make a new propulsion to catch up with it. F1 racing in space.


No what I really like is that they don't watch what the poll's say and just spend money in the right projects and go ahead with it. No matter what the polls on tv say. Cause people don't see the benifits but when the benifits arive they can't life without them. So just go and people can see what is coming out of it. They just have to bring out what they spin off with commercials. So a brand maker got stuff made from space tech they can say in the commercials... this is made possible by Nasa space Tech...



posted on Jan, 19 2004 @ 06:50 AM
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well nothing new under the sun eh
I'll just wait a bit and if someone of you stumbels over something on the topic whatever mission that involves interstellar travel just post ok?



posted on Jan, 19 2004 @ 07:02 AM
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has Voyager ever actually left our solar system? i know comparitively it hasn't gotten very far

with the new propulsion systems it is feasible for us to build a probe that could build enough speed to get to the Alpha Centauri system within a human lifetime, Ion Propulsion could concievably used for up to half light speed, the only problem being, how to brake it into Alpha Centauri



posted on Jan, 19 2004 @ 07:27 PM
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Originally posted by KKing123
has Voyager ever actually left our solar system? i know comparitively it hasn't gotten very far

with the new propulsion systems it is feasible for us to build a probe that could build enough speed to get to the Alpha Centauri system within a human lifetime, Ion Propulsion could concievably used for up to half light speed, the only problem being, how to brake it into Alpha Centauri


It is finally out of the orb cloud.



posted on Jan, 20 2004 @ 12:46 AM
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We can't get any data from the Voyager can we? Or would it even matter, since it's to dark? I'm sure its to far.

Silly me; I don't know really, just getting into space "stuff".....



posted on Jan, 20 2004 @ 10:29 AM
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Lets go to the moon first and mars way later then the main part of being on the moon is aimed of trying to develope a new propulions system redifing physics and testing those prototypes in space were they supose to do there job. testing up to lightspeed kind of systems can not been done on earth cause they need exotic energy beginning from fision and fusion.
with a highspeed craft and with great moving in all direction. you could go everywhere in no time and do alot of stuf later.

[Edited on 20-1-2004 by MarkLuitzen]



posted on Jan, 20 2004 @ 11:49 AM
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wouldnt interstellar mean sending man into the fathest reaches of space and successfully colonizing other systems? thats wwut i think, but as to going to mars, its just a trip to our next door neighbor, in this case atmospheric neghbor.





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