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Individual human genome mapped

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posted on Sep, 4 2007 @ 07:18 AM
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Individual human genome mapped


www.ndtv.com

The first individual human genome has been mapped and will provide the first complete blueprint of an individual.

Researchers at J Craig Venter Institute have decoded 2.8 billion bits of genetic code of Venter himself, who is also the author of the study.

The study shows much more genetic variation between individuals than was previously known.
(visit the link for the full news article)



[edit on 4-9-2007 by UM_Gazz]




posted on Sep, 4 2007 @ 07:18 AM
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They have finally mapped an entire human's genes. Looks like alot of the stuff that we thought was true about our dna, such as most of it is junk dna is wrong. This is just starting to break so there isn't alot of info on it yet but this is huge. The implications for science and medicine will be enormous. And we are apparently much more different than previously thought. This is the only link I have found so far. Much more to come I'm sure.

www.ndtv.com
(visit the link for the full news article)

[edit on 4-9-2007 by GAOTU789]



posted on Sep, 4 2007 @ 02:58 PM
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Here's a more main stream source.


Article from the Globe and Mail


"The biggest single surprise is how much we missed the boat with the human genome seven years ago, and how different we really are," Dr. Venter said in an interview. "The overwhelming message back then was that we are all like identical clones of each other. ... It's comforting to know we are more unique than that."




"With this type of knowledge now in hand, the stage is set for an era of personalized medicine, where genome sequence information becomes a critical reference to assist with health-related decisions," said Dr. Scherer, who is also a professor of medical and molecular genetics at the University of Toronto.

Most experts predict that routinely reading individual genomes will become a reality within five years as the technology to unravel the six billion chemical units that make up DNA gets faster and cheaper.


The article also says that although it cost $1 billion dollars to produce this mapping, they expect it to drop in cost to about a $100,000 by the end of the year due to invention of ultra fast DNA sequencing machines.

This could change the way we practice medicine in the very near future.

[edit on 4-9-2007 by GAOTU789]



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