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Yemeni Price Protests Turn Violent

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posted on Sep, 2 2007 @ 11:03 AM
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Yemeni price protests turn violent

At least one person has been killed and nine wounded in clashes between Yemeni police and demonstrators protesting against rising prices in the capital, Sanaa.

Government officials say the rise is due to a sharp increase in the prices of commodities such as wheat in global markets.

The government has ordered state bodies to import goods and provide them at lower prices.

Four out of 10 Yemenis live on less than $2 a day, according to Britain's department for international development, which says Yemen's oil, its main earnings source, is expected to dry up by 2015.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Once again we see an example of peak oil considerations (higher price and limited ability to pay) hitting poor countries first. Food prices are directly related to energy prices and given the current economic situation we can expect more stories like this in the future. Importing goods and providing them at lower prices can't go on forever and their own oil supplies run out in just 8 years.
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[edit on 9/2/2007 by Gools]




posted on Sep, 2 2007 @ 06:17 PM
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Originally posted by Gools


At least one person has been killed and nine wounded in clashes between Yemeni police and demonstrators protesting against rising prices in the capital, Sanaa.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Rising GENERAL prices that has everything to do with the general poverty in the country and the failure of regulation to ensure affordable foodstuffs.


Government officials say the rise is due to a sharp increase in the prices of commodities such as wheat in global markets.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


And we know the world is flooded with wheat and other basic grains so we know this is just another instance of market manipulation or absence of government regulatio to protect consumers.


The government has ordered state bodies to import goods and provide them at lower prices.

Four out of 10 Yemenis live on less than $2 a day, according to Britain's department for international development, which says Yemen's oil, its main earnings source, is expected to dry up by 2015.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


How big is Yemen and since when has expectations of oil running out really been accurate? Show me some instances where evidence does not show that massive manipulation of supplies were not really behind PRODUCTION declines.


Once again we see an example of peak oil considerations (higher price and limited ability to pay) hitting poor countries first.


How is peak oil involved in poverty in general? Why is there a limited ability to pay in Yemen?


Food prices are directly related to energy prices and given the current economic situation we can expect more stories like this in the future.


Food prices are not directly linked to oil prices as the billions that grow their own food with their own labour proves. INDUSTRIAL production of food is very energy intensive but the yields is very high and in the end food is in fact produced more cheaply that way which helps to destroy third world countries who had agrarian economies to start with; how does third world farmers sell excess food for income ( to pay taxes, send kids to school, buy medicine or whatever ) when their countries are flooded with cheap foreign grains that can not produce as cheaply?


Importing goods and providing them at lower prices can't go on forever and their own oil supplies run out in just 8 years.


Importing food at lower prices can go on forever as the alternative is starvation which no human being on this planet should accept as natural or logical.

Stellar

[edit on 2-9-2007 by StellarX]



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