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Denver International Airport - Underground lab proof!

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posted on Aug, 21 2011 @ 10:20 PM
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Quick note for you all, didn't skim the WHOLE thread but I'm assuming it's not in there - the 'mysterious keypad' on the time capsule is NOT a keypad. It is a plaque which has the text on the capstone engraved in Braille so that blind people can read it as well. I've spent a solid hour going over it, there are no buttons or anything manipulatable anywhere on it. No keyhole, no sliding panels, nothing. There is DEFINITELY something going on there. Just ride the trains (and look at a few of my particularly old threads) and you'll glean some new insight. There are many tunnels jutting off to the sides which the trains never go down.




posted on Aug, 23 2011 @ 12:19 AM
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Some interesting facts About the Denver International airport.


Even though the area is basically flat (with a stunning view of mountains all around, since it's in a valley), the expense and time was taken to extensively lower some areas and raise others. They moved 110 million cubic yards of earth around. This is about 1/3rd of the amount of earth they moved when they dug out the Panama Canal.
The airport has a fiber optic communications core made of 5,300 miles of cable. That's longer than the Nile River. That's from New York City to Buenos Aires, Argentina. The airport also has 11,365 miles of copper cable communications network.
The fueling system can pump 1,000 gallons of jet fuel per minute through a 28-mile network of pipes. There are six fuel hold tanks that each hold 2.73 million gallons of jet fuel. This is somewhere in the "no one will ever ever need this much" range.
Granite was imported from all over the world - Asia, Africa, Europe, North and South America - and used in making the main terminal floor. This is a ridiculous expense, especially when you're already over budget. They say, "The floor pattern echoes the roof design and subtly reinforces passenger flows". Ah...subliminal messages to move your ass. It might look pretty but would any of us know Chilean granite from Chinese granite? Or care? You can dye rock if it's colors you're after. Cheaper rocks. (I wonder what the "stones have power" people say about this...)
The huge, main terminal is Jeppesen Terminal, named after Elfrey Jeppesen, who was the first person to create maps specifically for aviation (the company is still in business today). This area is known as the "Great Hall"; it's said this is what the Masons name their meeting place.
It is 900 feet by 210 feet big. This is over 1.5 million square feet of space. All told, there is over 6 million square feet of public space at DIA. The airport brags that they have room to build another terminal and two more concourses and could serve 100 million passengers a year. The airport flew 36 million in 2001.
The only way to get to the other two concourses/terminals from the Great Hall, or vice versa, is via the airport's train system.
There are more than 19 miles (30 km) of conveyor belt track, luggage transport cars and road in their own underground tunnels that move baggage and goods. They're so huge you can drive trucks through them, and some remain unused.
The entire roof of DIA is made of 15 acres of Teflon-coated, woven fiber glass. The same material is on the inside as a layer, also. The place looks like a bizarre (but kind of cool) scene out of "Dune", comprised of huge, spiked tent-like structures. The material reflects 90% of the sunlight and doesn't conduct heat. So you can't see into the place with radar or see heat signatures. I added helpfully.


Read more at www.anomalies-unlimited.com...



posted on Jul, 6 2014 @ 01:01 AM
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I have recently started collecting information on this particular site and was wondering if anybody had the time to set down and chat with me on some of the theories that are currently out there and if anyone thinks they have new evidence. I am really interested in this site for some reason it has a definite creepy vibe. I know that they were given approximently 1.9 billion to build this airport but ended up close to the 4.9 billion mark. You would think with the engineers involved and all the planing it takes for a project this big they would have a pretty close goal for a budget.



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