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NASA tests liquid methane rocket-must see!

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posted on Aug, 30 2007 @ 11:14 AM
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Wow-check this baby out-Just the new liquid methane fueled rocket from NASA being tested in the Mojave desert.



www.wired.com...#

www.youtube.com...

Holy Mackerel,WHAT a beast...


[edit on 30-8-2007 by Silcone Synapse]




posted on Aug, 30 2007 @ 11:23 AM
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Daaaamn, that is one nice looking rocket experiment. I was just wondering
our rockets right now are using gas right?



posted on Aug, 30 2007 @ 11:36 AM
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This one is liquid methane,not sure if they have used these on any missions yet.Man,that pattern/vortex thing going on in the exhaust is awesome.
Had my THX speakers on stupid volume by accident when I watched it first too...sent things moving off my desk,ears still recovering.OW.



posted on Aug, 30 2007 @ 11:48 AM
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Impressive!

Any got any specs on it, like the average payload one of these can lift into orbit?



posted on Aug, 30 2007 @ 11:52 AM
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Sweet rocket man - best of all it will run off gaseous excretions of the astronaut's, break out the brussel sprouts and baked beans! (sorry for that)

Didn't know about the Mach disks and counting them and multiplying by the local speed of sound - another piece of trivia for the arsnel



posted on Aug, 30 2007 @ 11:53 AM
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Hi Zannzibar,heres the NASA page on the engine,it mentions the test as being 7,500 pounds of thrust,but not much more in the way of specifications.

science.nasa.gov...



posted on Aug, 30 2007 @ 01:04 PM
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Cheers mate.


Reading that article was incredible, the implications of this engine will (quite literally) propel us into the stars. Being able to refuel mid-mission is a massive step forwards and I really do hope they pour as much money as possible into making this engine a reality on the next generation of shuttle.

I was a bit worried about this though,


On Saturn's moon Titan, it is literally raining liquid methane. Titan is dotted with lakes and rivers of methane and other hydrocarbons that could one day serve as fuel depots.


Figurative speech, I know, but I think that simply saying it is worrying. Is that how NASA see Titan? Hopefully not.



posted on Aug, 30 2007 @ 01:20 PM
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reply to post by Zanzibar
 


Well said Zanzibar,
Hmm NASA could certainly view titan in the manner you speculate.If not now then when they have manned craft in the area in the future.They would see it as a distant fuel depo maybe.
Pretty hard to harvest the fuel though,and HEY put that cigarette OUT now!!Too late ...BooOOM.
There goes the fuel supply.

Sure is an awesome rocket fuel though-that exhaust looked like something from a StarWars intergallagtic Imperial mothership.
Come on NASA !!


jra

posted on Aug, 30 2007 @ 06:32 PM
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Originally posted by Equinox99
Daaaamn, that is one nice looking rocket experiment. I was just wondering
our rockets right now are using gas right?


By gas I assume you mean the kind we put in our cars? If so, no. There are a number of different types of fuels for different rockets, but liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen are a common combination. The space shuttle, for example, uses liquid oxygen and hydrogen for its main engines and then two solid fueled rocket boosters on the side.



posted on Aug, 31 2007 @ 12:00 AM
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Methane, right? So when NASA sparks the fuse at the bottom of this bad-boy, and sends massive tonnages burning through the sky...

Whats that gonna smell like?!



posted on Aug, 31 2007 @ 12:48 AM
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Awesome rocket! Sounds beautiful



posted on Aug, 31 2007 @ 08:21 AM
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Hey all,thanks for the interest-
To me,this is yet another one of those events where reality was predicted by science fiction-Imagine these engines on some future mothership type craft...

I can't wait...



posted on Aug, 31 2007 @ 08:26 AM
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reply to post by Zanzibar
 


No specs, but more information is on the XCOR website



posted on Aug, 31 2007 @ 09:16 AM
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Originally posted by damajikninja
Methane, right? So when NASA sparks the fuse at the bottom of this bad-boy, and sends massive tonnages burning through the sky...

Whats that gonna smell like?!


Its going to smell like pure water and CO2. Yes methane has an odor, and a methane flame has an odor, but the methane will be burned in pure oxygen instead of air which contains nitrogen.

As a fuel it has yet to be used in rockets because it gives little advantage. It has a lower specific impulse than liquid hydrogen and not much more than kerosene. While much less dense than hydrogen taking up less space it requires a cryogenic pressure vessel that could be heavier than the larger hydrogen tank.

Japan has been woking on a methane motor for the upper stage of the Galaxy Express rocket and is near abandoning the project. They could buy a Centaur stage that performs better for less money....

But it is a great solution for a return trip from Mars. Using electricity the methane and the oxygen can be made from the atmospheric CO2 if you bring along the hydrogen which is only 5% of the weight.

This is the reason behind the development, not because of a technical advantage.



posted on Sep, 2 2007 @ 11:33 AM
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All the science guys can answer this for me; if they've managed to create an engine that runs on water (yes I have the video if no one has heard of it) and can cause salt water to ignite under radio wave transmission (have that too) Why wouldn't they pursue THAT?

I don't have the 15pound head for specific impulse computations.


Don't beat the nube!



posted on Sep, 2 2007 @ 11:39 AM
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Originally posted by Skidz
All the science guys can answer this for me; if they've managed to create an engine that runs on water (yes I have the video if no one has heard of it) and can cause salt water to ignite under radio wave transmission (have that too) Why wouldn't they pursue THAT?

I don't have the 15pound head for specific impulse computations.


Don't beat the nube!


The car that runs on water is a hoax.

The saltwater that ignites is simply electromagnetic inductive disassociation of water. A new twist on the water lamp. You must input more energy with the transmitter coil than you get out from the hydrogen.

The reason they don't use these systems to power a rocket is because they only work with proven science.

[edit on 2-9-2007 by Malichai]



posted on Sep, 2 2007 @ 12:52 PM
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All about conspiracy, however the "proven science" was the public broadcast on a fox news channel.

Like I stated, I'm a nube on this so if I figure out how to post it I will.
Thanks for restraining the lash though LOL


[edit on 2-9-2007 by Skidz]



posted on Sep, 2 2007 @ 01:24 PM
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Originally posted by Skidz
All about conspiracy, however the "proven science" was the public broadcast on a fox news channel.

Like I stated, I'm a nube on this so if I figure out how to post it I will.

Its not really on topic in this thread. The saltwater to hydrogen 'discovery' has already been covered in another thread, and there are plenty of water powered car threads already.

The system making exploding seawater must be plugged into the electrical outlet. You can't have a rocket with an extension cord.

None of the water powered cars have been demonstrated in a long drive that could not be explained by hidden fuel tanks.

And, even if it did work the 'reactor' needed to supply tons of hydrogen and oxygen every second would weigh more than current liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen rockets. And the water would weigh just as much as the fuel on a conventional rocket. There is nothing to gain.

So, even if it did work its not practical for a rocket system. Maybe for creating the fuel in a ground system, but not for flying.

So, we managed to discuss it without completely dismissing the possiblity of other applications....




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