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What's A Hacked iPhone Worth? How About A New Car?

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posted on Aug, 29 2007 @ 07:24 AM
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What's A Hacked iPhone Worth? How About A New Car?


www.forbes.com

Now the news-making youth is trading in his gadget for a new ride.

On his blog, Hotz wrote that Terry Daidone, the founder of CertiCell, a mobile phone repair company, contacted him and offered to make a trade for the modified iPhone.

"I traded it for a sweet Nissan 350Z and 3 8GB iPhones," Hotz posted.
(visit the link for the full news article)



Related AboveTopSecret.com Discussion Threads:
NJ Teen Unlocks IPhone From AT&T Network




posted on Aug, 29 2007 @ 07:24 AM
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Now the kid cashes in, I bet the folks at Apple and AT&T aren't too pleased with this.

In the first thread Foxe said :


No, only if he sold it for his own profit.

They can try to sue, but would lose, badly.


Would this be considered sold for profit, or just a trade?

Does this open up CertiCell to any litigation?

I don't know, it seems though if AT&T has a contract for exclusivity, could they now use this to back out of payment, I think one way or another something will be done.



www.forbes.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Aug, 29 2007 @ 07:34 AM
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I found an article which goes into the aspects of Apple and AT&T's legal options concerning the iPhone hacking.


Why Apple Can't Stop iPhone Hackers

....So will Apple and AT&T's legal action deter hackers? Hardly. Individual users are already allowed to unlock their own phones under an exemption to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) that the U.S. Copyright Office issued last November. The exemption, in force for three years, applies to "computer programs…that enable wireless telephone handsets to connect to a wireless telephone communication network, when circumvention is accomplished for the sole purpose of lawfully connecting to a wireless telephone communication network."

What's less clear is whether companies and hackers can legally unlock the phones and then sell them to others, or sell unlocking software. "The law here is unclear," says Jonathan Kramer, founder of Kramer Telecom Law Firm in Los Angeles. "There just isn't any case law in this area for us to figure out how it plays out."

Experts believe that AT&T and Apple will point to the DMCA's section 1201, stating that "no person shall circumvent a technological measure that effectively controls access to a work protected under this title." They will claim that a phone lock is just such a technological measure that protects copyrighted work: namely, cell-phone software....


It will be interesting to see what comes next.....



posted on Aug, 29 2007 @ 07:38 AM
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Well thats good for him. (If he doesn't get into trouble or sued that is) Got himself a new car.



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