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Ancient bacteria could point to life on Mars: study

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posted on Aug, 28 2007 @ 02:43 PM
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Ancient bacteria could point to life on Mars: study


www.reuters.com

Ancient bacteria are able to survive nearly half a million years in harsh, frozen conditions, researchers said on Monday in a study that adds to arguments that permafrost environments on Mars could harbor life.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Aug, 28 2007 @ 02:43 PM
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Now call me a paranoid conspiracy site visiting theorist but does anyone else get the feeling that they are softening us up for some major announcment when the new crafts touch doown in may 2008

little by little it is being ingrained in your minds so as not to be a shock to the .02% of people that think we are unique still...

along with the other recent major post this is a new article from main stream media .... do u think Disclosure will start like this , we are being drip fed etc etc..

www.reuters.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Aug, 28 2007 @ 03:19 PM
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This isn't really anything new...these theories have been around, I'm guessing, since Viking. it's just that now we're closer than ever to actually proving them.

The general public isn't going to care much about microbes anyway, so I'm not sure how much this would actually "soften" anything. Until we actually have "greys" being interviewed on Fox, CNN, and MSNBC, I don't think the vast majority of the public will care.



posted on Aug, 28 2007 @ 03:47 PM
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Interesting, but I just wish the article mentioned what Family or Genus of bacteria was found. In other words I would be intrigued to see if the bacteria they observed was something other than a Psychrophile or Hypolith, which are well known microbes that can survive in extremely cold conditions. These particular forms of bacteria or archaea metabolize using photosynthesis and chemoautotrophy which keeps their cell membranes and DNA resistant to the freezing effects of cold environments. They are quite common in the Arctic and Antarctic, which is why I wouldn't find their survival rates all that spectacular.

However, should these scientists have found a Thermophile like Chloroflexus Aurantiacus, Pyrodictium Abyssi, or something similar in the Frozen soils it would be far more of a scientific breakthrough. These organisms only survive in warmer temperatures than their counterparts, which would mean a couple of different things to the person that would discover them in permafrost or glaciers. For instance, we know that microorganisms such as Psychrophiles are naturally able to survive for long periods in extremely cold environments. On the other hand, finding a Thermophile or something like it frozen and able to be resuscitated when normally it should have died would be a far greater step in understanding how organisms can survive the extremes.

I will be very curious to hear what type of bacteria they actually found in those samples. We already know that bacteria and other organisms can survive as extremophiles in some conditions, but taking them out of their natural environment and placing them within a completely different set of ecological barriers would show their true resilience. The potential for a normally warmer microbe surviving in a frozen environment would shed major light on the issue of adaptability and evolution. This would be where it's impact on Astrobiology would be enormous, and why I would very much like to know the Genus and Species of the bacteria they found in this instance.



posted on Aug, 29 2007 @ 09:46 AM
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Here is an older article I found interesting, as it states the bacteria they found was nearly 8 million years old:

8 Million year old Bacteria

Again, they don't seem to go into much detail, which doesn't help explain what type of bacteria they were observing. However, it doesn't appear that this particular bacterium is a radioresistant extremophile since they mention damage to the DNA structure from cosmic radiation.




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