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A Minnesota Mystery: The Kensington Runestone

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posted on Aug, 26 2007 @ 09:50 AM
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A Minnesota Mystery: The Kensington Runestone


wcco.com

(WCCO) It's one of Minnesota's greatest mysteries. It's something that puts settlers in America well before Columbus. A Minnesota geologist thinks the controversial Kensington Runestone is the real thing and there is evidence that he says backs up the theory. "I'm sure a lot of people are going to roll their eyes and say oh it's the Davinci Code and if they do they do. This is the evidence. This is who was there. This is what the grave slabs tell us. It is what it is," he said.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.coasttocoastam.com
www.rense.com
www.crystalinks.com

Related AboveTopSecret.com Discussion Threads:
Nordics and the Lost Colony of Roanoke
Templars in America 1362




posted on Aug, 26 2007 @ 09:50 AM
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Interesting read. I had never heard of the Kensington Runestone before this article. After doing some research it would seem alot of people credit the stone as a hoax perpretrated by a farmer in 1898. Now after scientific scrutiny and analysis by geologist's and linguistics it would seem that the stone is the real thing. It was first thought to possibly be from the vikings, but after some intense research and analysis it would seem that the stone may have originated from the Knights Templar, complete with secret/coded messages. If this is indeed the case it would put the exploration of America a 100 or more years before Columbus.



wcco.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Aug, 26 2007 @ 11:27 AM
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I grew up about 25 miles from where the Runestone was found and
I have always belived it to be authentic from the research I have
done.

It is on display at the Runestone museum in Alexandria Minnesota
along with many other Viking artifacts found in the area.

JFY

[edit on 26-8-2007 by kc0jfy]



posted on Aug, 26 2007 @ 12:05 PM
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There are also runestones in Oklahoma. I believe there are 4 total. Don't remember the exact location of all of them, but the most talked about is in Heavener, Oklahoma.



posted on Aug, 26 2007 @ 12:13 PM
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Interesting find.

There are many things still to discover.

The Kensington Runestone even has its Wikipedia page.



posted on Aug, 26 2007 @ 12:16 PM
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there were some runestones 2 i believe were found in arkansas as well here is a site that describes the stones theselves and possible interpretations and origins

users.aristotle.net...

one of the two stones pictured on the site linked was analyzed and claime to be a 5k year old copy?
here is the full quote,

"came to the conclusion that the stone was a 500-year-old Amerindian copy of a 1000-year-old Norse grave marker."

as taken from the linked source.
mod edit to use "ex" tags
Quote Reference.



[edit on 27-8-2007 by sanctum]



posted on Aug, 26 2007 @ 12:28 PM
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That is the Elder Futhark rune script/alphabet, which was used by the Viking culture (and later by the Germanic), predominately Scandinavian, my ancestory, and also used by the Norsemen of the Isles North East of North America. Best known for their most popular leader "Leif Eriksson (Leif the Lucky)", one could also include "Eric the Red", whom were decended of those Vikings who emigrated from the traditional home back east of the Atlantic.

It is most likely his exploration/s that lead to these stones creations. If I could get a good view of the stone, I could decipher it. Going by what I know of the script, it could hold two meenings. The symbols used together in a sentence is for the written language. Individually they are representative of symbolic meaning, and thus hold a double meaning. Much like Druidic or Celtic Ogham.

[edit on 26-8-2007 by ADVISOR]



posted on Aug, 26 2007 @ 12:54 PM
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You're right Valhall. There are 3 (remaining) in Heavener, Ok., and 1 in Poteau, Ok. I believe there are also some in Massachusets, North Dakota and Maine.
There is also a book by Erik Friis about runestones in the Americas. Can't find it right now but they were apparently not all that rare.



posted on Aug, 26 2007 @ 02:41 PM
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reply to post by ADVISOR
 


I hope these pictures will do you justice for transcribing.
www.econ.ohio-state.edu..." target='_blank' class='tabOff'/>



posted on Aug, 26 2007 @ 11:10 PM
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No doubt USA has a lot of these yet to be found. Possibly made people were here before the Natives.



posted on Aug, 27 2007 @ 07:12 AM
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I first heard of this stuff when reading a book about Edgar Cayce...a name I have never actually read on this site suprisingly.....he spoke of journeys from Norsemen(not an exact quote...he coulda said vikings,...or scandanavians...I don't know what he said or the dif between em, but it was along those lines so just bear with me...I'm just some brainwashed, desensitized, money driven, god fearing/loving American idiot) to as far as the midwest, and if I remember correctly from what I read....Cayce even claimed to have been Eric the Red in a past incarnation!! It's been a couple years since I read that book...and it wasn't written by Cayce(coulda been some CIA operative spreadin disimformation about Cayce because of his connection to oneness(Buhdda Kicks everyone's Ass, bring it!!!!)......AKA zero point energy...AKA the one weakness of the Cabal/grey alien/ Plejaren/ neo-con/ reptilian alien/ Illuminati/ Hobbit/ Free Mason/ CIA/ Sons of Liberty/ NSA/ Smurf/ Edward Condon agenda......nah...prolly not, but stilll...just think about it)....., but did take a lot of direct quotes form his readings.... I believe this dude to be fairly accurate as prophets go....since he predicted some future events(nope, not cited...)...and did find actual working cures for some ailments(saw it on Unsolved Mysteries when i was a kid...Robert Stack wouldn't lie...right?)....I mean he's no Kevin Trudeau...but still, out of all psychics, you gotta wonder about Cayce...anyone wanna start a thread on him(haven't looked for any as of now, but haven't seen any either...)....he still does interest me after all these years...certainly cooler than Kris Angel, David Blaine, and Your Unlce who makes the end of his finger disappear........ok, maybe not Kriss Angel, but.....oops...waaay off topic here...better ban me from the site...and this is only my second post!!! DAMN!

Peace....I'm out...

J.

Mod Edit: BB Code.

[edit on 27/8/2007 by Mirthful Me]



posted on Aug, 27 2007 @ 08:14 AM
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reply to post by highfreq
 



I'm part Norwegian. I like mysteries. You get a flag.

Thanks for posting this, I hadn't heard of it before and would like to find out some more now.



posted on Aug, 27 2007 @ 08:30 AM
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I once saw a program on TV about some mysterious markings carved into a rock cliff here in Texas. They were found by early settlers and resembled Celtic writting.

I have looked for a link and couldn't find one. It may be that the markings were already debunked but I thought it would be noteworthy to mention in this case.

It's already well known that Columbus and other western Europeans were not the first white men to find America. It's not much of a stretch to think that Vikings or others may have forded rivers to explore areas further inland. Perhaps the rune stone is a marker--their version of the flag we left on the moon to say "we were here first".



posted on Aug, 27 2007 @ 09:33 AM
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Thanks for opening my eyes to this one, very interesting indeed.

But let me ask you this, the text on the stone reads (roughly) 'when we came back they were red with blood and dead'. What in the blue blazes killed them? Or who?



posted on Aug, 27 2007 @ 09:35 AM
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Awesome topic! Definately going to look more into this particular subject.



posted on Aug, 27 2007 @ 09:41 AM
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All the archaeology I've seen in regards to the Kensington Runestone indicates that it is a fake. The only solid evidence of Vikings in North America...aside from some artifacts in the high Arctic and Labrador, is at L'anse aux Meadows, Newfoundland.

This is a persistant story, but scientists don't buy it.



posted on Aug, 27 2007 @ 10:49 AM
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I found this vid which is a promo for 1362 - The Kensington Enigma

I guess will be a documentary with this stone as the subject.

Posting for those interested.




posted on Aug, 27 2007 @ 10:53 AM
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Originally posted by JohnnyCanuck
All the archaeology I've seen in regards to the Kensington Runestone indicates that it is a fake. The only solid evidence of Vikings in North America...aside from some artifacts in the high Arctic and Labrador, is at L'anse aux Meadows, Newfoundland.

This is a persistant story, but scientists don't buy it.


I think what you meant to say was SOME scientists don't buy it, but SOME do.


In November 2000, geologist Scott F. Wolter presented preliminary findings suggesting the stone had undergone an in-the-ground weathering process that would have taken a minimum of 50-200 years. In response, Wolter examined each individual rune on the Kensington stone with a microscope. He found a series of dots engraved inside four R-shaped runes. Research found that indentical dotted runes are found only on 14th century graves in churches on the island of Gotland off the coast of Sweden. "We found the dotted R's. It's an extremely rare rune that only appeared during medieval times. This absolutely fingerprints [the Kensington Runestone] to the 14th century. This is linguistic proof. This is medieval, period" Wolter said.

Wiki



posted on Aug, 27 2007 @ 11:43 AM
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Originally posted by JohnnyCanuck This is a persistant story, but scientists don't buy it.



Originally posted by Jeremy032180I think what you meant to say was SOME scientists don't buy it, but SOME do.


That's a legitimate call, Jeremy. I've just seen the source that you quote here...outside of wiki...and what it seems to do is is to challenge the methodology of the debunking rather than prove that the stone is original. There is a difference.
The whole issue of pre-Columbian visits by Europeans is a tough one because there is so much hooey out there that has to be filtered. It's better to remain skeptical and make higher demands of the evidence. Paradigms change...look at how the dates of the peopling of North America have come around in the past decade...but if you're gonna rewrite the history books, you have to be sure of every step. There is always somebody ready to make an intuitive leap into gonzo science so you need to know just where the solid ground ends. I won't buy into the KRS just yet.



posted on Aug, 27 2007 @ 01:01 PM
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reply to post by JohnnyCanuck
 



It's a double edged sword all around the board. Is it real or isnt' it? Some say yes, some say no. The internet can be great for information, but it can also lie, or in my case, be out of context to a degree. Conspiracy theories in general ride that fine line of 'truth' and 'no this is truth'. Which does add to the appeal of Conspiracy Theories, but hinders them to a degree as well. It gets frustrating that some really good theories and finds are never 'proven' to be true, but also never proven to be not true. They just lay in limbo with no clear answer, right on top of that sword.

I guess what I'm trying to say is that you are correct, very correct, to demand more information and using existing information to formulate a hypothesis. I actually in the future will try to reflect on this before jumping the gun on like issues.



The level-headedness of this board combined with the theories in question have been the main reason I've lurked these forums for many years and am proud to be participating in them now. I thank you for reminding me of this JohnnyCanuck.



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