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Moon Craters

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posted on Aug, 24 2007 @ 03:22 PM
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This would be my first post here so if I'm posting this in the wrong spot, then my apologies. I have been very interested in Moon bases recently, specifically the theory that the moon itself is a huge "hollowed out" ancient base of some sort. Now researching the topic a little and viewing many pictures of the moon, I have noticed more often than not that the majority of craters have a flat bottom.

Can someone point me in the right direction to research this topic in more detail? I see no reason why impact craters should have flat bottoms... It's almost as if a mallet hit the surface rather than a round asteroid or meteor.

Thanks!




posted on Aug, 24 2007 @ 03:26 PM
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reply to post by blackbox
 


Maybe from settling dust?
RR



posted on Aug, 24 2007 @ 03:46 PM
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reply to post by RudyRed
 


Back in the same hole where the impact was made? Possibly. Never thought about that.

Basically I was just asking if there are any sites out there dedicated to this kind of research? I've exhausted most of the stuff you easily find with google.



posted on Aug, 24 2007 @ 03:50 PM
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Originally posted by blackbox
Now researching the topic a little and viewing many pictures of the moon, I have noticed more often than not that the majority of craters have a flat bottom.

You can start ere on earth. Here's a flat bottomed crater in Arizona.



posted on Aug, 24 2007 @ 03:53 PM
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Originally posted by schuyler

Originally posted by blackbox
Now researching the topic a little and viewing many pictures of the moon, I have noticed more often than not that the majority of craters have a flat bottom.

You can start ere on earth. Here's a flat bottomed crater in Arizona.


Yeah, but show me one that deep on the moon and I can stop wondering now, blow it off and get ready for football season.



posted on Aug, 24 2007 @ 09:14 PM
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Ralph Juergens and Immanuel Velikovsky both argued that cratering was the result of electrical scarring from cosmic thunderbolts, this can explain the flat bottoms as well as many other effects that impact theory cannot.
Tunguska is a good candidate, a comet being a highly electrically charged object, when on an impact with the earth will arc with the earth causing the cosmic thunderbolt and will cause the comet to explode in the atmosphere, the lightning bolt does the cratering.
Here is some more evidence to suggest this is true.

This lunar pic is a great example of electrical cratering.

This shows electrical cratering done in the lab, notice flat bottoms.

Here's a list of dozens more examples.


A lightning strike on a golf course, see the resemblance to the mysterious martian spiders?

Check out this picture of Europa.




posted on Aug, 25 2007 @ 08:09 AM
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The answer is pretty simple. During an impact, the high energy that's generated melts the rock, which pools and then cools down to form a flat bottom.



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