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It's getting worse

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posted on Aug, 23 2007 @ 01:23 AM
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An 11-year-old boy shot dead while playing football with friends in a pub car park has been named.


news.sky.com...Sky news story

This happened last night. Surely it's a sign that this 'yob culture' is getting so out of hand.

I have heard heard some politician or other spouting absolute garbage about how ASBO's and Behaviour contracts are working, when they clearly are not.

The streets are getting worse and worse.

We need major policy change as soon as possible or I dread to think what will happen.

I live in Liverpool - about ten minutes away from the scene - and heard the sirens last night. I just knew something really bad had happened.

My thoughts are with the family of Rhys Jones. Poor kid.




posted on Aug, 23 2007 @ 07:25 AM
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posted on Aug, 23 2007 @ 11:08 AM
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More victims of the non accountabillity culture that seems to be the preserve of the privelidged few who tick all the boxes for hungover 70's radicals, off planet politicians and career police men.

The excuse is they're socially excluded.

Used to be called evil in the old days.



posted on Aug, 23 2007 @ 12:14 PM
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We need major policy change as soon as possible or I dread to think what will happen.


The question is how much worse is it going to get and what can be done?

I saw some guy on the news who's suggesting buying guns (which is currently illegal but he's trying to change that) from gun owners and turning them into the police...
...I think this must be one of the most ridiculous ideas I have ever heard.

If people want guns and they are available then they are going to get them. And legalising the purchase of guns seems a little bit counter productive...of course this is just my opinion.

[edit on 23-8-2007 by surrender_dorothy]



posted on Aug, 23 2007 @ 12:40 PM
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Yet another shooting, This time, 3 men are shot, one in the face.

Apparently, 2 black men have been arrested and people believe it was drug related.



posted on Aug, 23 2007 @ 01:28 PM
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The news has been shocking with regards to the frequency of violent behaviour (especially involving knives/guns) as of late.

The thing is that it seems overwhelming... so how do we even begin to deal with what are clearly huge hurdles that we have to tackle? It has to be a long-term, multi-pronged attack at the very foundations of knife and gun culture.

Clearly we need more prison places... some of these people need to be off the streets of Britain as soon as possible before they commit further crimes. But I think it's all too fashionable to blame the police/government when local communities are also at fault. In truth, everyone (national and local government, the police, local communities, support groups, schools/colleges, businesses etc.) needs to get behind these anti-gun/knife initiatives.

Get some well known celebrities in to appeal to younger kids to give up the knife/gun lifestyle (they make more than enough money playing football/singing/acting). Get local people to stand up and make it clear that it's unacceptable.

Other areas obviously play roles too, particularly drugs, alcohol and poverty. These core issues need to be addressed concurrently so that when gun and knife crime levels start to drop, there's no need for anyone to get back into that destructive cycle.



posted on Aug, 23 2007 @ 02:17 PM
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Clearly we need more prison places... some of these people need to be off the streets of Britain as soon as possible before they commit further crimes. But I think it's all too fashionable to blame the police/government when local communities are also at fault. In truth, everyone (national and local government, the police, local communities, support groups, schools/colleges, businesses etc.) needs to get behind these anti-gun/knife initiatives.


With the best will in the world I think it's totally unfair to blame communities, they've been living with this blight and asking for help to deal with these thugs for years. The best response they get is some ropey community initiative which provides a policeman on a skateboard, talking jive and teaching the local kids to rap...cos it's trendy ennit. I think it's bloody arrogant for the politicians to blame those who've suffered most. The local commuities know how it should be dealt with but no one listens.

And a really good incentive to help sway young kids thinking thinking about a path of violence, anti social behavious and drugs...prison sentences and bloody long hard ones at that. I'm all for other more proactive and inclusive initiatives but unfashionable as it sounds without fear operating at some level in it all it isn't going to work...ever. When they see the big swaggering hard men going down for a long time it will make most think twice about it and send out all the right messages to criminals and community.



posted on Aug, 23 2007 @ 02:35 PM
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The blame lies totally at the feet of various governments over a 20 plus year period and the "do gooders" society.

Look back and remember when the law changed, when it became possible for your own kids to take you to court, even divorce you as parents if you should have gone as far to administer physical punishment, in my teenage years it was known as a clip round the ear.

The schools, who we gave ownership of our kids during the day and also the right to give out the odd slap here and there, well they suffered too, no caning or a ruler across the knuckles otherwise a visit to the courts and been sued by a little snot nosed uppity for daring to put him or her in their place.

I left school in 1983, all through school and home life I knew that if I got caught doing wrong then I was going to get a clout, it was accepted when it happened and made it all the more exciting when doing something wrong, hoping not to be found out.

For the record, at school I had the cane, slipper, football boot and cricket bat all meet my derriere with total disregard for its youthful softness, and they all hurt, did I deserve them, hell yes and I accepted the punishment to, afterall while doing wrong before been caught I did have a great laugh too


Nowadays the kiddies have no place to go, no one understands them, BAH it was the same for every generation before, except this generation have been given so much of a free hand and know that they cannot be touched that they do as they please.

Wolfie



[edit on 23/8/07 by Wolfie_UK]



posted on Aug, 23 2007 @ 06:22 PM
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Originally posted by ubermunche
With the best will in the world I think it's totally unfair to blame communities, they've been living with this blight and asking for help to deal with these thugs for years.


I wasn't trying to blame communities solely - simply pointing out that they, like other sections of the hierarchy, have played their role in the situation we find ourselves in now.

I think it's extremely important that we take a step back and find out exactly which areas of our response isn't working before we take further action - we need to find out who is making which mistakes before we can come up with ways to sort things out.


Originally posted by Wolfie_UK
The blame lies totally at the feet of various governments over a 20 plus year period and the "do gooders" society.


Forgive me for picking on your post in particular, Wolfie, but I feel that it's exactly that kind of thinking ("It's all the government's fault!") that will mean progress will be slow. People expect too much from central government when they really could make a far bigger difference at a local level.

Now, I agree with you that government policy has certainly played a major role in things turning out as they are. But does the blame lie totally there? I don't think it does.

I think that we need to sort this problem out mainly at a local level rather than a national one because gangs operate in different ways and for different reasons in different areas. Blanket laws are simply not going to sort this out alone. MPs and central government has a big role in the solution, but the key players are to be found on a local level. They will be the driving force in pushing this gang culture out of young peoples' lives. I believe that part of the reason this problem has gone on is because people have come to expect someone else (namely the central government) to sort it out, not themselves and their neighbours. As long as people keep thinking like that, the problem will perpetuate itself. Central government alone is the wrong tool for the job in this case. Local initiatives backed and encouraged by the central government and local governments/the police/businesses/schools are.



posted on Aug, 23 2007 @ 06:39 PM
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Ste people are dying because they've intervened, or else there homes and families are targetted, at best they run the risk of arrest after assault allegations are made against them. People don't act on a local level anymore because they are simply not backed or protected by the powers that be.

In the percieved bad old days of a clip round the ear and corporal punishment plenty of people did intervene because in those days all but the very worst cases wouldn't dare cross a certain line. It's not a sudden cessation of community intervention turning youth into savages it's the brutal response fostered by years of too liberal management that's inhibated intervention. If you want people to intervene in those kind of circumstances it means tooled up and mob handed unless of course you're John Claude Van Damme. What do you prefer but please don't ask me to saunter out to try and reason with a gang of yobs who wouldn't know reason if it bit their arses.

They embrace a nasty cultural ethos that has been enabled and indulged for too many years by those who don't have to live with it's consequences

There is something rotten in the state of Demark and it starts at top down not bottom up.



[edit on 23-8-2007 by ubermunche]



posted on Aug, 23 2007 @ 10:16 PM
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I hope you don't mind me hopping in here but your post caught my eye.

As someone living near a dangerous city in the US, your stories sound too familiar and are a 5 second blip on the news.

Now I thought that guns were illegal in the UK. So if kids are getting armed, does that mean someone is smuggling them in?It is pretty sad that the goal of the mayor is to get the murder count under 300 a year.

I just wanted to offer that I know that some neighborhoods have managed to take their neighborhoods back by everyone banding together, having shifts of constant vigilance, and instantly reporting any suspicious activity.

Our city finally did manage to drop the murder rate by enhancing the police force, and having several times during the month in an operation called "all hands on deck" where every single officer is on patrol, basically suffocating out the criminals.

So in a nutshell, if people are watching and keeping vigilance, it does drop the crime.

People turn into criminals when they have no hope. They don't feel that they have another means of survival, they have bad homes, and uncaring parents. Or they are poor. While the answer may seem a simple 'get a job" some jobs just don't pay enough to survive. Or they have been let go from too many.
Programs, like after school programs, or community clubs, not only give kids things to do, but give them hope, teaches them skills, and lets them feel like a productive member of society. And many work. Not 100%, but every kid saved is wonderful.

just my 2 cents.



posted on Aug, 23 2007 @ 11:02 PM
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Sorry I haven't got round to replying to your posts until now, had a bit of a mad day...

I'll do so now.


from stumason
What makes it worse is that at first glance, it would appear this is a "random" attack.


That is what seems so scary. In a lot of the other stories you have linked to, the attack is often a result of someone being challenged or gang related. This just seems crazy. Even more crazy is that an 18 year has been arrested. What are these people thinking?


from ubermunche
Used to be called evil in the old days.


I quite agree. These days people focus on every other issue rather than the mindset of the thugs.


from surrender_dorothy

I saw some guy on the news who's suggesting buying guns (which is currently illegal but he's trying to change that) from gun owners and turning them into the police...
...I think this must be one of the most ridiculous ideas I have ever heard.

If people want guns and they are available then they are going to get them. And legalising the purchase of guns seems a little bit counter productive...of course this is just my opinion.


If 'law abiding' citizens start arming themselves, I feel that the battle is lost and the thugs have won. The lowest common denominator has then taken over and things can never be as they once were - not to say they ever will again...


from ste2652
Clearly we need more prison places... some of these people need to be off the streets of Britain as soon as possible before they commit further crimes. But I think it's all too fashionable to blame the police/government when local communities are also at fault. In truth, everyone (national and local government, the police, local communities, support groups, schools/colleges, businesses etc.) needs to get behind these anti-gun/knife initiatives.


Great idea. Get them off the streets. The only problem with this idea is just what do they have to do before they will actually be sent to prison? Our judges seem to be getting more and more liberal.

However, echoing ubermunche, I also think it's unfair to blame communities. Peope are now just plain scared. On a personal level, I have tried calling the police after having death threats made at me on the street, only to be told by them, 'next time ask them exactly what they're gonna do to you, then we might be able to do something.'

See why people are becoming disillusioned?



from nixie_nox
Now I thought that guns were illegal in the UK. So if kids are getting armed, does that mean someone is smuggling them in?It is pretty sad that the goal of the mayor is to get the murder count under 300 a year.

I just wanted to offer that I know that some neighborhoods have managed to take their neighborhoods back by everyone banding together, having shifts of constant vigilance, and instantly reporting any suspicious activity.

Our city finally did manage to drop the murder rate by enhancing the police force, and having several times during the month in an operation called "all hands on deck" where every single officer is on patrol, basically suffocating out the criminals.


Welcome to the discussion, feel free to join in.

Guns are generally illegal in the UK but somehow they are widespread amongst gangs and the young. So, somehow there appears to be a huge arms ring here that never seems to be mentioned on the news - as far as I can see.

I think people over here would be more willing to maintain constant vigilance if they felt they had the suppost/backing of the police. Unfortunately, they seem as if they'd rather be catching speeding drivers than dealing with real criminals, so until their priorities change, people will still suffer and be unable to take our areas back.

Operation 'all hands on deck' certainly sounds interesting. I'm sure taht 'funding' be cited as a reason not to do it over here though. Do I sound cynical?


Thanks for the input one and all, and I hope we can carry this on.

Cheers,

Paul



posted on Aug, 24 2007 @ 03:38 AM
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reply to post by nixie_nox
 


Thanks for your contribution, nixie. Very interesting to see that things are similar across the Atlantic (I know guns are legal in the US and they aren't in the UK, but still...).

What you say only strengthens my belief that this has to be a community led initiative. Regarding what these people have to do to get arrested in the first place, well, here's where central government comes in - they're going to make membership of a gang an aggravating factor in sentencing. If new laws are required (and I'm not convinced they are at the moment... it's action that we need) then central government can pass them but the bulk of the work must lie at a local level (backed by the bodies I mentioned previously... the police, council, community groups, schools etc.) because a national strategy can't be effective on its own... local groups can tailor their response to their particular area and deal with the problems they know they have to face rather than what some civil servant in Whitehall thinks they have to face.



posted on Aug, 24 2007 @ 07:42 AM
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Ste I'm not against these initiatives at all but to echo more serotonin we can have all the laws and pass new ones but if some judges mindset is to go easy on them because they're disadvantaged we don't move on.

I'd also like to point out that these incidents aren't always gang related strictly, they're thug related. Like the 63 year old man who was beaten unconciouss on a train for 'looking' over at three thugs. They were'nt part of a gang just violent nasty characters. Im all for protecting young kids from the evils of gang culture but I want the streets safe for everyone and lots of these attacks are carried out randomly on random victims.



posted on Aug, 24 2007 @ 10:51 AM
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For the last five years i've been saying about increasing sentences to set an example. It may seem extreme but these are my views on this one.

Anyone caught carrying a firearm should be given a minimum 20 years sentence. I don't mean 5 years with good behavior either, i mean 20 years served.

Anyone found carrying a knife should be given 10 years minimum, again no good behavior taken off.

This would apply to anyone, i don't care if they are 8 years old.

I am so liberal on many issues but when it comes to guns and knives i know just how dangerous they are. I would hope this would reduce the idiots carrying these weapons.



posted on Aug, 24 2007 @ 11:35 AM
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Originally posted by ubermunche
Ste I'm not against these initiatives at all but to echo more serotonin we can have all the laws and pass new ones but if some judges mindset is to go easy on them because they're disadvantaged we don't move on.

I'd also like to point out that these incidents aren't always gang related strictly, they're thug related. Like the 63 year old man who was beaten unconciouss on a train for 'looking' over at three thugs. They were'nt part of a gang just violent nasty characters. Im all for protecting young kids from the evils of gang culture but I want the streets safe for everyone and lots of these attacks are carried out randomly on random victims.


This is a snippet from the intro of a wildly popular book called Freakonomics. I'm sure your all familiar with it but I think this could have some relevance to this topic. In my opinion it is the disadvantaged and poorly educated that are the major perpretators of these incidences. I don't feel that they should be treated leniently however I think that dealing with the problem of why they are disadvantaged. This is based on America in the early 1990's...


Death by gunfire, intentional and otherwise had become commonplace. So too had carjacking and crack dealing, robbery and rape....The cause was the so-called superpredator....He was scrawny, big-city teenager with a cheap gun in his hand and nothing in his heart but ruthlessness...


Sounds familiar to me. Of course the situation in the States was far worse but I think there are parallels. The optimistic scenerio presented to the U.S. attorney general by criminologist James Alan Fox in 1995 estimated that teen homocides would rise another 15 percent over the next decade. The pessimistic estimation said it would rise more than double. This was the prediction of many other learned forecasters and people in influencial positions including Bill Clinton.

However contrary to popular opinion the crime started to fall. Teen mourders fell by more than fifty percent in five years. By 2000 the overall murder rate in the United States had dropped to it's lowest level in thirty five years. The same went for most other types of crime. This part of story I find most amusing.


Even though the experts had failed to anticipate the crime drop...they now hurried to explain it. Most of their theories sounded perfectly logical. It was the roaring 1990's economy...the proliferation of gun control laws..it was the sort of innovating policing stratagies put into place in New York City, where murders would fall from 2,245 in 1990 to 596 in 2003.

These theories were not only logical; they were also encouraging, for they attributed the crime drop to specific and recent human initiatives...

These theories made their way, seemimngly without question, from the experts' mouths to journalists' ears to the public's mind. In short course, they became conventional wisdom.

There was only one problem: they weren't true.

There was another factor, meanwhile, that had greatly contributed to the massive crime drop of the 1990's. It had taken shape more than twenty years earlier and concerned a young woman in Dallas named Norma McCorvey.

Norma McCorvey...was a poor, uneducated, unskilled, alcoholic, drug-using twenty-one-year-old woman who had already given up two children for adoption and now, in 1970, found herself pregnant again. But in Texas, as in all but a few states at the time, abortion was illegal. McCorvey's cause came to be adopted by people far more powerful than she. They made her the lead plaintiff in a class-action lawsuit seeking to legalize abortion. The defendant was Henry Wade, the Dallas County district attorney. The case ultimately made it to the U.S. Supreme Court, by which time McCorvey's name had been disguised as Jane Roe. On January 22, 1973, the court ruled in favor of Ms. Roe, allowing legalized abortion throughout the country. By this time, of course, it was far too late for Ms. Mccorvey/Roe to have her abortion. She had given birth and put the child up for adoption. (Years later she would renounce her allegiance to legalized abortion and become a pro-life activist.)


So finally we come to the point of it all. How did this contribute to the crime drop?


As far as crime is concerned, it turns out that not all children are born equal. Not even close. Decades of studies have shown that a child born into an adverse family environment is far more likely than other children to become a criminal.


This is where the parallel really lies...


...poor, unmarried, and teenage mothers...models of adversity. They were the very women whose children, if born, would have been much more likely than average to become criminals.


The point I'm making is that all of these teenage parents whose husbands are drug dealers(in my town these "families" are great in numbers) are encouraged by the government through ridiculously improportionate benefits to carry on as they are. In my town if you get pregnant when you leave school than you are guaranteed a council house. Most teenage girls secretly get pregnant for the purpose of getting their own place. If they don't work they will get housing benefit and money to raise the children. Any extra cash(drug dealing) will go toward feeding their own drug habits. And this is the environment that breeds antisocial behaviour.

I am not saying that all children from poor backgrounds will become criminals but I'm sure it doesn't, generally, have a positive effect. People respond to incentives. Our government have taken away student grants and still give great rewards to those who leave school up the duff with no GCSE's.

This is insanity. PEOPLE RESPOND TO INCENTIVES!

Of course, this is only my opinion.



posted on Aug, 24 2007 @ 11:43 AM
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I can give a very unique perspective on this, and this is my own opinion and experience, and not representative of many Americans.
LOl, like my disclaimer?
Now, I just want to start by asking that in the UK, the police are not armed, right? Just the military? That is what someone has told me. Or does it depend on the country?

Yes, under the Constitution Americans have the right to bear arms. But it is a state by state how much arms you can really bear. And each state is different.I have signifigantly lived in three different states. Now, you have the right to bear arms, but some states, the more liberal ones, make it darn near impossible to do so. And the crimes are different in each one, which makes it interesting. It is not as free as people like to throw around.
The state I currently live in, Maryland, is one of the ones that makes it darn near impossible. The only people who can carry handguns are the police and park rangers. For anyone to carry a handgun, you have to prove that your life has been threatened. In 16 years, I have yet to meet someone who can.
You have to keep them locked in a safe at home. Only carry them locked in a trunk to a shooting range. It takes months to get approved to buy one if you are a collector. You can buy rifles for hunting, again, it takes awhile to get approved as your record is checked. Even if you are legally owning and transporting a gun, it may be confiscated to make sure you check out.There is such a stigma attached to it that collectors don't readily reveal that they even just collect. It has been my experience that if you see a handgun in public, you duck. It means either a police shoot out or a drug deal gone bad. And it happens a lot.
So imagine my shock moving to Arizona.
Where if you have a driver's license, you can open carry.A 3 hour course lets you conceal carry. And everybody and their mother conceals. Even grandma. People are comfortable with it, will whip out a gun and show it too you in the middle of the street. It was very hard to get used too.
So what is it like living in a gun toting society? Actually, pretty peaceful. Since everyone is armed, there is very little personal crime. When everyone is armed, most criminals don't take the chance of personal attacks, because even grandma can shoot you, and knows how too. There is a whole lot of car theft and breaki-ns. I thought it was funny when an armored car got held up and everyone talked about it for three days. After living between DC and Baltimore, that would have been the 5 second blip.
And the strange thing was that though guns are serious,and everyone can have one, people treated them with a lot of respect. They were like cars, they were an important instrument, and investment, many were heirlooms. So people knew how to handle them, respect them, and took very good care of them from day one. They take their rights to carry seriously, and they take the responsibility to carry seriously.
There were far more incidents of pool drownings then accidental shootings.
Back to the state where people can't carry, there is high incidences of murder, rape, drug shootings, carjackings,etc. A lot of personal crime.
Because the only people who are armed are the criminals.
Just like drugs, no matter how illegal it is, if the criminals want it, they are going to get it.
So by outlawing it for the average citizen, all you are left with is armed criminals and defenseless citizens.
Now, while it may seem strange for everyone to be armed, I am not suggesting that everyone should do so. But I just want to give a unique perspective that it is not as scarey as people think.
We have horrible crime here despite gun control. And about half of Americans are for stricter gun control. But you can control it all you want, the criminals are going to get them. Just like drugs, it is a losing war. So the only thing you can do is arm yourself.Drugs here are rampant.

Now what has to be considered is the source of the crimes. What has changed to get people involved in crime?Yes, we have some guns. But believe it or not, Canada has far more guns per capita then Americans do, but they are a quiet peaceful society. So what is the difference?

If our public problems are starting to sound the same on both sides of the pond, I think you(and us) need to look into what has changed to cause these problems. Because guns don't force people into crime. People go into crime and look for the guns.
Is the economy worse? are people working more hours? are both parents now working away from home? Has there been in increase in depression and mental illness? Has there been an increase in unemployment? Are there increased stressors? Has the lower class increased in numbers? Is there less community involvement and neighbors are getting estranged from each other? Is there a lot of apathy? Civil unrest?


I think that controlling guns is only trying to squash a symptom, instead of curing the disease. People don't go into crime because they want too. They either don't know any different, it was the way they were raised, or they were not given a choice.
But these are just my ideas. I am not an expert.

I read an interesting passage once from a book called Joey the Hitman. He was a famous hitman for the mob in the 60s.
He explained how he ended up there.he was orphaned, and poor. Ended up running errands for the mob in order to make money. No one took him in and showed him how to be a plumber or cabinet maker. He said if they had, he would of not led a life of crime. It was an interesting read.



posted on Aug, 24 2007 @ 11:46 AM
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Originally posted by nixie_nox
Now, I just want to start by asking that in the UK, the police are not armed, right? Just the military? That is what someone has told me. Or does it depend on the country?


There are Armed police, but they are used in special circumstances. All forces will have a few ARV's (Armed Response Vehicles) with specially trained Officers.

The rest of the Police will not have firearms, but will have an ASP, CS spray and possibly a tazer, depending on the force.



posted on Aug, 24 2007 @ 11:55 AM
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Originally posted by nixie_nox
Is the economy worse? are people working more hours? are both parents now working away from home? Has there been in increase in depression and mental illness? Has there been an increase in unemployment? Are there increased stressors? Has the lower class increased in numbers? Is there less community involvement and neighbors are getting estranged from each other? Is there a lot of apathy? Civil unrest?



I think you know the answer to each of those questions....


Society is crumbling, for whatever reason and this situation is the symptom. But, at least in the UK (as seen with the Gun laws of the 90's - Prior to 1987 it was fairly easy to get a legal weapon) the Government reacts to a "problem", when it reality, the "problem" is really a symptom of something larger, which they do not address...

The public at large have lost faith in the Political system, because they do not appear to be in touch with society. MP's earn £50,000/year, Ministers twice that. They all have paid for houses in London and are rarely seen in their constituencies. Government's are elected on less than 25% of the popular vote, but due to our system, that minority gets to Lord it over the rest (Labour and their peculiar way's).

The system is fudged up and no one, it seems, wants to fix it.

Those that do are looked down upon as cooks or wierdo's.

Even the public, whilst on the one hand complaining about Government, will then on the other pay no attention to the Political process, so we go round in circles.



posted on Aug, 24 2007 @ 12:07 PM
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Now, I just wanted to make a couple of points real quick to keep in mind.
I haven't been there, so I don't know how the media is. But if it is anything like ours, any bad thing that has happened is reported. You don't hear the good stuff, rarely. It is beaten to death. It may not even be that there is an increase in crime, you are only hearing about it more. Because bad news equals ratings. I hope it is a trend not infiltrating your society. I remember a comedian saying once: I got sick of all the sex and violence on television so I stopped watching the news.
Also. along with hearing these events, what is the ratio to population? Has the population increased? If you have more people, you have more crimes. But if it stays, at 5% for an example, 5% of 1 million people is going to seem a lot more then 5% of 1000.
I had a friend who was a psychologist for inner city children. I had great talks with him about why the poor inner city folks are so involved with crime, and why don't they want better for themselves. He simply told me it is because they don't know any better. He said imagine a 5 year old who sees uncles, brothers,fathers, gettting locked up for drugs and theft. The girls are all getting pregnant at 14. If that is all they see, that is all they know. They don't gain better knowledge to pass on.It is a curse that keeps getting passed on from one generation to the next. He said that for them, the house,job,and white picket fence is about as achievable as you buying the Taj Mahal. It is a distant dream, and a far off one. Despair breeds despair.

DC has some of the worst neighborhoods in the country. A man, decided to take matters into his own hands, and started volunteering to give troubled teens community service for the courts. The community service was to help clean up the Anacostia river in their neighborhood, which is one of the sickest rivers in the country. This is instead of throwing these kids into jeauvanile hall. Some off the kids learned from it, got a great deal of pride from seeing the results of their hard work, and that it made a difference in how their community looked. It gave them pride in something that they have never seen or had before.Some learned skills. As a result, many finished high school, a few went on to college. Some even came back to volunteer for groups. The program is so popular that there is a waiting list. Sadly, not all kids can be saved, but quite a few were. This guy has been receiving national recognition for his work.
That is why I say it is important to reach out to the underprivelaged. Because some of these kids, if given a chance, want better.



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