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The Moon is still alive

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posted on Aug, 21 2007 @ 10:13 PM
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I ran across this article. It appears John might not be so crazy.

www.nasa.gov...


this one is a year old, but relevant
science.nasa.gov...




posted on Aug, 21 2007 @ 10:17 PM
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wow man, i am a astronomy geek, but i never knew about this, thank u alot.
i guess now everything changes, the way we look at the moon, is not a beautiful dead rock anymore, now is a beautiful alive and breathing rock



posted on Aug, 21 2007 @ 10:23 PM
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The moon is alive!

We're in the wrong galaxy!

Just when i thought the moon was made out of cheese...hey, maybe it aged so much it took on a life of its own- moldy cheese.

This is really incredible news. So much for the moon being just a rock, huh?

These discoveries are coming so fast and furious its enough to make our heads spin!



posted on Aug, 22 2007 @ 06:49 AM
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It would not surprise me to find out there are many gas pockets trapped within the moon, and I would bet that the core is still a little warm, but I doubt there is volcanic activity any longer.

Just goes to show, we have a lot to learn because things happen in the universe on both a size and time scale that humans can't begin to comprehend.

-or it could be because the moon is hollow and all the moon aliens were moving some some stuff around, causing the moonquake. The out gassing is just that, they have to release their...ah...er....waste somehow-



posted on Aug, 22 2007 @ 12:11 PM
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Hey Aquarius,
I did a similar thread the other day,but with a different link:


"In October 1963, two cartographers with the Air Force Aeronautical Chart and Information Center saw a strange glow on the moon. Using the 24-inch refractor telescope at Lowell observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona, James Greenacre and Edward Barr saw a deep, ruby-red glow coming from the crater Aristarchus. The sighting might have been glowing gas from volcanic activity, and a second sighting in November of that year was verified by Dr. John Hall, Director of the observatory at the time."


www.physorg.com...

Pretty amazing,and recent activity-and yes Aristarchus is what John Lear has speculated my in fact be a fusion reactor.

Great place to visit I rek.



posted on Aug, 22 2007 @ 12:26 PM
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Originally posted by Silcone Synapse
Pretty amazing,and recent activity-and yes Aristarchus is what John Lear has speculated my in fact be a fusion reactor.

Great place to visit I rek.


Actually, John Lear speculated that Aristarchus is a fission reactor due to its blue color, which he thinks is caused by something like Cerenkov radiation. This article states that the observed color was a "a deep, ruby-red," hardly validating John's opinion. And is lunar seismic activity really that surprising?



posted on Aug, 22 2007 @ 01:23 PM
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Originally posted by Silcone Synapse
Hey Aquarius,
I did a similar thread the other day,but with a different link:


"In October 1963, two cartographers with the Air Force Aeronautical Chart and Information Center saw a strange glow on the moon. Using the 24-inch refractor telescope at Lowell observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona, James Greenacre and Edward Barr saw a deep, ruby-red glow coming from the crater Aristarchus. The sighting might have been glowing gas from volcanic activity, and a second sighting in November of that year was verified by Dr. John Hall, Director of the observatory at the time."


www.physorg.com...

Pretty amazing,and recent activity-and yes Aristarchus is what John Lear has speculated my in fact be a fusion reactor.

Great place to visit I rek.


yeah, its much more likely that theres a fission reactor of some sort on the moon, then that its just glowing gas from volcanic activity...

why would it be strange that the moon is geologically active? to a certain degree of course...



posted on Aug, 22 2007 @ 01:35 PM
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Well I wasn't saying it was strange,rather than that I was amazed at the fact that the activity was observed from Earth at the time.

And yeah,postal76 I meant fission rather than fusion.My mistake.



posted on Aug, 22 2007 @ 01:37 PM
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O.K. To make the leap from remnant geologic activity to "alien fusion reactor" is a little far of a jump, don't ya think?



posted on Aug, 22 2007 @ 01:47 PM
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The death star(moon) is still alive!?!?!?

Whoops! There goes our planet.

www.youtube.com...



posted on Aug, 22 2007 @ 01:47 PM
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Originally posted by IgnoreTheFacts
O.K. To make the leap from remnant geologic activity to "alien fusion reactor" is a little far of a jump, don't ya think?


Mate,I wasn't saying it wasa reactor- I was merely observing that it was at the same location as that had been speculated by JL,and that the volcanic activity must have been really great to find on an Earth based scope in the 60's.
I would love to have a scope good enough to witness that level of detail on the moon.



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