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Did the Space Shuttle dock at the Secret Space Station tonight?

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posted on Oct, 13 2007 @ 12:13 PM
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A while back I posted that Buran could carry 100 tons... and I couldn't find the reference where I got that from...

Well today I did....

27 June 2001
From New Scientist Print Edition.
Barry Fox, Baikonur


Russia plans to reassert itself as a major power in space by resurrecting the Buran space shuttle, a relic of the Soviet era. It will pay for the development programme in part by taking more space tourists like Dennis Tito up to the space station.

Buran was mothballed in the early 1990s by the cash-strapped Russian government. But with the satellite launching business expanding and the International Space Station running behind schedule, Russian space officials think Buran's time has come.

Last week Energia, the state company which built Buran, opened its hangars at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan to show Western aerospace engineers that Buran is ready and waiting for relaunch.

"There is a future for this programme," says Leonid Gurushkin, director of launch operations at Baikonur. "Buran is the only launcher with a 100-tonne payload," he says. "By extending the length we can carry 200 tonnes. There is no alternative to Buran and I don't see any coming." The largest load possible in a Western launcher is little more than 20 tonnes.



There are a couple of other interesting points in this article...


All the necessary machinery is still in place at Baikonur, and the hangars are stacked with spare rocket motor parts and fuel tanks.

Energia thinks there is now a role for Buran because the International Space Station is creating the need to carry ever larger loads into low orbit. "We have been dreaming of this time," says Gurushkin.


Ever larger loads... more and more cargo... and we are just scraping the surface here...

And this part is great, as we did not hear about this company until recently...


Russia's other state space company, Khrunichev, is a rival to Energia, but its director Alexander Kondratiev says he welcomes any opportunity for Russian space engineers to compete with the West on an equal footing.

"Until 1990 we couldn't tell anyone what we were doing. But now we can show the world our worth," he says.
Ironically, the money for Buran's revival will be coming from the West. In the past 17 months, Russian Protons have launched 17 commercial satellites, earning Russia more than $100 million per launch.

And despite NASA's opposition, Gurushkin says Russian flights to the space station will soon carry more space tourists. "We already have many applications. We are currently considering them all and will take whoever pays most," he says.



jra

posted on Oct, 13 2007 @ 02:30 PM
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Originally posted by zorgon
A while back I posted that Buran could carry 100 tons... and I couldn't find the reference where I got that from...


Well it sounds like the guy means to say that the Energia launcher can carry 100 tons (which it can) and not the Buran. An empty Buran shuttle doesn't even weigh 100 tons, there's no way it could carry more than it's own weight. Could you provide a link to your source? Thanks.





[edit on 13-10-2007 by jra]



posted on Oct, 13 2007 @ 03:44 PM
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Originally posted by jraCould you provide a link to your source? Thanks.


I did...

27 June 2001
From New Scientist Print Edition.
Barry Fox, Baikonur

Its taken from a magazine... I have not found it online yet. You might be right and as yet I have not received response from anyone at Enregia... maybe I should get a Russian translator and write them via snail mail



posted on Oct, 13 2007 @ 08:54 PM
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Originally known by the over-all code name "Buran," (which means "snow storm") the Energia-Buran launch system, encompassing all aspects of this system, (as referenced in the following quoted document,) has led to the confusion of specific vehicle/launch system references in translated documents ever since.


Further confusing matters is the fact that the contractor selected to build the system(s) was/is also called "Energia."


The government decree 132-51 authorising development of the Energia-Buran system was issued on 12 February 1976 with the title 'On development of an MKS (reusable space system) consisting of rocket stages, orbiter aircraft, inter-orbital tug, guidance systems, launch and landing facilities, assembly and repair facilities, and other associated facilities, with the objective of placing in a 200 km Northeast orbit a payload of 30 tonnes and returning a payload of 20 tonnes'. The Ministry of Defence was named the Program Manager, with NPO Energia as the prime contractor. The official military specification (TTZ) was issued at the same time with the code name Buran (the name Energia for the launch vehicle separately did not come into use until just before the launch).

Source | Encyclopedia Astronautica | Energia

Buran Reusable Shuttle Vehicle Technical Specifications

Energia Launch Vehicle Technical Specifications



posted on Oct, 15 2007 @ 08:03 PM
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To Zorgon:

Looks like autoredaction without the black magic marker. Pretty sneaky...

To yfxxx:

Yep, bending light with a magnetic field or electrostatic field takes a lot of power. Any field, even gravity, requires a tremendous amount of force.

E, B, and gamma are at right angles to each other in a transverse wave. What is the rotation for a compression wave?



posted on Oct, 15 2007 @ 10:38 PM
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Originally posted by Matyas
Yep, bending light with a magnetic field or electrostatic field takes a lot of power. Any field, even gravity, requires a tremendous amount of force.


Well yes but does not having a spaceship that generates such a field mean you would first HAVE a lot of power?


I figure we just hit up MIT for one of these babies...




Or get Bob Lazar to give us that chunk of 115 he has hidden away...

Funny thing happened on the way to my search engine

Aquila ===> Lunar Generated Liquids Cargo Transport
Shackelton Crater ===> Water Ice Deposit 100 kilometer square are 15 ft thick according to DoD...

This lead me to an internal email...

David Minns
05/09/2000 08:29 AM
To: Sara Shackleton/HOU/ECT@ECT
cc: Raymond Yeow/ENRON_DEVELOPMENT@ENRON_DEVELOPMENT

Sara, further to my email. Has the confirmation for the Melbourne HDD swap
with Aquila been signed yet. If it has we need to do the "back to back"
confirmation with EAF.

ENRON????

Those are the guys CIA was 'looking into' Remember 911? ALL the Enron records vanished when WTC 7 'melted' from the fires... No more was heard about Enron after 911

So is Enron mining Helium 3 on the Moon? No idea but if they are... we in big trouble...

Either that or its pure coincidence and a muddling up names... like Energia



posted on Oct, 15 2007 @ 11:40 PM
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reply to post by zorgon
 



Now THAT is very intriguing. I watched the Shackleton stuff you sent, and i will try to have the quote for you tomorrow.

However, it kind of makes the Ley death seem a little more suspicious (or auspicious, depending on if you are CIA or not
).



posted on Oct, 15 2007 @ 11:42 PM
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reply to post by Matyas
 


So now we can all agree that EM power can bend light waves given sufficient power?


Now...if we have that settled, could we then consider the possibility of altering the physical properties of a locale to a degree where the power needs can be greatly reduced?



[edit on 15-10-2007 by bigfatfurrytexan]



posted on Oct, 16 2007 @ 01:11 AM
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I am sorry i can't add very much value here but i am not sure if anyone has seen these. Perhaps useless but i guess just a couple of extra pics.






Some other stuff about Buran
and
NASA's New CEV Launcher to Maximize Use of Space Shuttle Components

Perhaps useless info but here it is none the less.



posted on Oct, 16 2007 @ 01:46 AM
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Originally posted by shearder
I am sorry i can't add very much value here
NASA's New CEV Launcher to Maximize Use of Space Shuttle Components


Nope not useless at all
I didn't have that article... It's interesting to note that the CEV looks a lot like the Aquila well at least Buzz Aldrin's version



Now then there was another cargo ship called "Aquila" built by Amroc (American Rocket)



The date for the first launch of Amroc's test vehicle, the Single Engine Test-1 (SET-1) slipped from July to August, 1989. In July, traveling to the test site, George Koopman was involved in a single-car accident along an isolated stretch of highway and was killed. He was 44 years old....

In August 1998, commercial space development company SpaceDev acquired the rights to all of the intellectual property of American Rocket Company, including plans, designs, data, and patents to Amroc's hybrid rocket technology. SpaceDev sought to exploit the unique advantages of hybrid propulsion, espoused by Koopman, for low-cost launch vehicles and upper stages. SpaceDev has pursued inexpensive sounding rockets, small orbital launch vehicles, upper stage and orbit control power plants, and, more recently, supplies the main power plant for Scaled Composites' entry into the Ansari X-Prize, SpaceShipOne.


Getting Into The Launch Business: The Amroc Story

www.spacearium.com...



posted on Oct, 16 2007 @ 02:34 AM
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Originally posted by Matyas
To yfxxx:

Yep, bending light with a magnetic field or electrostatic field takes a lot of power.

You obviously didn't understand what I said. But thanks for trying.


Any field, even gravity, requires a tremendous amount of force.

BS! E.g., not much energy at all is needed to create a static magnetic field which is strong enough to counter earth's gravity in ferro-magnetic materials
!


E, B, and gamma are at right angles to each other in a transverse wave. What is the rotation for a compression wave?

Nice gobbledegook, especially the question
! Did you write that on your own, or was it created by some sort of "random scientific-sounding phrase generator"?

Regards
yf



posted on Oct, 16 2007 @ 03:00 AM
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So there's a secret space station up there? You bet! Take a look at this pic....


Courtesy: Daily Mail. Looks like that secret space station with the shuttle nearby,
that John's talking about! The image with the sun as background, was taken in
Normandy by French astrophotographer Thierry Legault. He used a digital camera
attached to a £5,000 specially kitted-out telescope.


Of course, this could just be the usual ISS, not the one run by the black projects. But hey! What do I know??

Cheers!


[edit on 16-10-2007 by mikesingh]



posted on Oct, 16 2007 @ 03:07 AM
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Originally posted by zorgon

Nope not useless at all
I didn't have that article... It's interesting to note that the CEV looks a lot like the Aquila well at least Buzz Aldrin's version


Yes
I saw that. Well glad i could add a little

It is actually close enough for one to sit up and go - hmmmmmm!!!

[edit on 16/10/2007 by shearder]



posted on Oct, 16 2007 @ 04:48 AM
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Originally posted by mikesingh
So there's a secret space station up there? You bet! Take a look at this pic....


So that's a "secret" space station
... well, I hope you're kidding when you say that
!

Regards
yf



posted on Oct, 16 2007 @ 04:54 AM
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Originally posted by yfxxx

Any field, even gravity, requires a tremendous amount of force.

BS! E.g., not much energy at all is needed to create a static magnetic field which is strong enough to counter earth's gravity in ferro-magnetic materials
!


Now it is your turn to not understand what I am saying here


If you want to do work against gravity, sure. But if you want to bend light with gravity you need a lot of mass! Translating the Earth's gravitational binding energy into measurable power is immense, and much more is needed to bend light, around say, a tin can large enough to hold you.

You must think I am scientifically challenged or something




E, B, and gamma are at right angles to each other in a transverse wave. What is the rotation for a compression wave?

Nice gobbledegook, especially the question
! Did you write that on your own, or was it created by some sort of "random scientific-sounding phrase generator"?


Well, I don't have gamma on the keyboard to represent a photon, so I spelled it out. I might as well spell the rest of it out for you since you have so much trouble understanding.

Your E field is your electric component of the electromagnetic wave, and your B field is the magnetic component. Gamma, or the photon, is the actual radiation. In a transverse wave they occupy the x, y, and z axis.

My question to you, since you have advertised yourself an expert and as such could help me with this problem, is what would be the orientation or rotation of the fields for a compression wave, often referred to as a longitudinal wave? If the axis is rotated, would the propagation then be directly effected by a magnetic or electric field?

O-K, its a two part question. But that shouldn't be too hard for you, now would it?



posted on Oct, 16 2007 @ 07:30 AM
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mikesingh... that's really low.

I know you are a bright, affable, even likable person. I read ALL your posts. Legault knew exactly... never mind - sensationalism.

Cheap, mikesingh. Deny Ignorance... Trashin' the quality work of a real researcher. There was a time you received a million point fine mikesingh... when Thierry gets real data something authentic is done with with it. You?

I will defend your ability within the T and C to speculate and entertain... not misrepresent the quality work of others.

Legault is aware of you now. 'You dig? N'est pa?

Vic



posted on Oct, 16 2007 @ 07:45 AM
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Originally posted by V Kaminski
mikesingh... that's really low.

I know you are a bright, affable, even likable person. I read ALL your posts. Legault knew exactly... never mind - sensationalism.

Cheap, mikesingh. Deny Ignorance... Trashin' the quality work of a real researcher. There was a time you received a million point fine mikesingh... when Thierry gets real data something authentic is done with with it. You?

I will defend your ability within the T and C to speculate and entertain... not misrepresent the quality work of others.

Legault is aware of you now. 'You dig? N'est pa?

Vic


What's this?
A veiled threat or something?



posted on Oct, 16 2007 @ 07:55 AM
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No threat. Legault is aware, no more, no less.

Vic



posted on Oct, 16 2007 @ 08:01 AM
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Originally posted by V Kaminski
No threat. Legault is aware, no more, no less.

Vic


Aware of what? That we appreciate his skills?
Oh gads, how horrible.

*runs off to see what else he's got*
*waves*

*grins*



posted on Oct, 16 2007 @ 08:14 AM
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Originally posted by mikesingh
So there's a secret space station up there? You bet! Take a look at this pic....

img.dailymail.co.uk...
Courtesy: Daily Mail. Looks like that secret space station with the shuttle nearby,
that John's talking about! The image with the sun as background, was taken in
Normandy by French astrophotographer Thierry Legault. He used a digital camera
attached to a £5,000 specially kitted-out telescope.


Of course, this could just be the usual ISS, not the one run by the black projects. But hey! What do I know??

Cheers!



Hopefully Daily Mail got permission to reprint the image?
Seems Legault has a warning on his page about usage of it.
He's enforcing his copyright:
legault.club.fr...
although that might be hard to
do since it was on the News. hrm. how's that work, anyway?


[edit on 16-10-2007 by undo]



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