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Did the Space Shuttle dock at the Secret Space Station tonight?

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posted on Sep, 25 2007 @ 10:32 PM
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Originally posted by Chorlton
Could you do a drawing of how you made the sausage dissapear in your microwave?


No but I can turn a grape into a plasma sphere in my microwave


Actually this is for Mr Furry because Matyas already knows this one...


Microwave Grape Plasma


Its the damnedest thing you've ever seen. Please realize that although we haven't actually damaged any of the ovens we've done this with, the potential exists to damage or destroy the microwave that this is done in, and the possibility also exists that it could harm a human being if the proper precautions are not made. Please see to it that you are willing to pay $200 for a new microwave before you try this, and that you have a fire extinguisher nearby. If you are under age 18, please seek the supervision of a parent or guardian. I accept no responsibility should this experiment cause damage or injury. How to make a glowing ball of plasma in your microwave with a grape:


Grape Plasma The "Hottest" New Rage




posted on Sep, 25 2007 @ 10:39 PM
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reply to post by MrPenny
 



Source | Non-Recoverable Cargo (Trash/Waste) Management Plan | International Space Station Program

3.2 TRASH AND WASTE GENERATION RATE
For the purpose of planning and analysis, the trash/waste generation rate of 2.6 cubic feet per day shall be used for a crew of three.




Source | Astronauts' Dirty Laundry


International Space Station crew members choose the shirts, shorts, and pants they will wear in space months before they are scheduled to launch. In fact, their clothes often arrive at the Space Station before they do in a Russian Progress or a Space Shuttle....

...Even though there's no laundry facility on the Station, Bowersox even figured out a way to wash his shorts using a plastic bag....

Vide o link to Bowersox cleaning his shorts.

...On average, station crew members get one pair of shorts and a T-shirt for every 3 days of exercising. Their work shirts and pants/shorts are changed, on average, once every 10 days. Crewmembers generally get a new T-shirt to wear under their work shirts every 10 days. Underwear and socks are changed every other day, but Polartec socks, which are worn if a crew member's feet get cold, must last a month. They also get two sweaters.




Count 'em, bag 'em, and do the math...we can't be expected to do everything for you...




[edit on 25-9-2007 by goosdawg]



posted on Sep, 25 2007 @ 10:45 PM
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Originally posted by Chorlton
A final point. If Zorgon and Lear have the right to question Nasa and everyone else, then I and others have the right to question them. I think even they would agree with that.


Oh I do afford you that right
And it is true you cannot prove a negative, which kind of leaves you with a problem.. I suppose you could write NASA and ask them. I am sure they will answer you honestly



As to our "faerie tail" well its only at Chapter One

I don't suppose we could enlist your help tracking down launch sites around the world where they could be sending stuff up? You know do the numbers and see just how much stuff is going up and where its all going?

After all that ISS is pretty small...



posted on Sep, 25 2007 @ 11:01 PM
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Looks like they may have a refrigerator/freezer as soon as the Columbus unit is delivered.



Source | Refrigerator/Freezer for Space Applications

Marlow Industries has lent its extensive experience in space-based thermoelectrics to the development of the Refrigeration Freezing Rack (RFR). The RFR is a specially designed refrigerator/freezer that will be used by astronauts on the Space Station for food storage and transportation.


They'll finally have a place to store all those tons of perishables.


Wait a minute...transportation?

Transportation to where?


And how many more than one but "fewer than ten" did they make?

And who else would need or have use for one?


[edit on 25-9-2007 by goosdawg]



posted on Sep, 26 2007 @ 07:13 AM
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Originally posted by goosdawg
Count 'em, bag 'em, and do the math...we can't be expected to do everything for you...


You apparently have the free time. Keep going, I'm willing to bet you will eventually justify the quantity of cargo delivered to the ISS.

Particularly look for documents that may discuss the planned wastage or non-use of deliveries. Don't forget, any good risk management plan would include increased supplies for any time frame the shuttle will be docked, considering the possibility it's stay may be extended due to unforeseen mechanical or weather related issues. The shuttle flies with 5 crew members.

A gallon of water weighs roughly 8.33 lbs. A human needs about a gallon a day. Those cargo ships also deliver water.

Go find a cargo manifest that details the items and quantities in a cargo shipment. Then find documents that detail the expected usage, waste, or spoilage of cargo contents.

Make it an academic pursuit and not some fanciful trek through "Space Ranger" amusement park. Consider it a challenge. I'm confident the numbers will support a reasonable conclusion; not some bizarre "shopping mall" scenario.

Matyas....

I didn't twist anything.....I don't see anything stealthy about the materials zorgon has offered. He found them via the public Internet. Often I see people who when they can't find the answer they want, simply fall back on the old "top secret" or "stealthy" approach.....I know it exists, they're just keeping it really secret.



posted on Sep, 26 2007 @ 07:17 AM
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Originally posted by goosdawg
Wait a minute...transportation?

Transportation to where?


And how many more than one but "fewer than ten" did they make?

And who else would need or have use for one?




Well, the first thing that occurs to me.....the period of time when it is not on the ISS, and is not on Earth....it is being transported. On other vessels.



posted on Sep, 26 2007 @ 11:25 PM
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Originally posted by MrPenny
...I'm willing to bet you will eventually justify the quantity of cargo delivered to the ISS...


But you're unwilling to do the required research yourself.

You find it much easier to simply demand that someone else do your legwork for you.

How unfortunate.


Originally posted by MrPenny
Particularly look for documents that may discuss the planned wastage or non-use of deliveries.


Those figures, of course, have already been covered by the information in the 34 page NASA/RSA document referenced in my previous post.

Your question leads me to believe you didn't take the time to read it through, did you?



Originally posted by MrPenny
Don't forget, any good risk management plan would include increased supplies for any time frame the shuttle will be docked, considering the possibility it's stay may be extended due to unforeseen mechanical or weather related issues.


Of course, but the referenced subject is the ISS.

The supplies required for the shuttle, under it's mission risk management plan, are brought by the shuttle, for the shuttle.

The only scenario that requires the shuttle to rely upon ISS supplies, apart from electrical power while docked, is the shuttle's long term inability to return to earth.

And that scenario would be duly (and dually) covered by both the risk management plan in place for the ISS, and the shuttle mission's risk management plan.


Originally posted by MrPenny
The shuttle flies with 5 crew members.


Sometimes the crew numbers seven on the shuttle.

It's debatable whether it ever actually "flies."


Originally posted by MrPenny
A gallon of water weighs roughly 8.33 lbs. A human needs about a gallon a day.


Most of the water used is recovered and recycled. Do you know the percentage that's not recovered, vented, and must be replaced?

Now there's something you can look up, the answer is probably easily available on the web.



Originally posted by MrPenny
Those cargo ships also deliver water.


And a good thing it is, too, see above if you're unsure why.


Originally posted by MrPenny
Go find a cargo manifest that details the items and quantities in a cargo shipment.


Again with the demands!? Try saying please.
Besides, didn't Zorgon go over that already?



Originally posted by MrPenny
Then find documents that detail the expected usage, waste, or spoilage of cargo contents.


You really didn't read that document, did you?

Do try to keep up, won't you?



Originally posted by MrPenny
I know it exists, they're just keeping it really secret.


Glad to see you're coming around, there may be hope for you yet...


Thanks for your input.



posted on Sep, 26 2007 @ 11:36 PM
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If there is a secret space station, don't you think someone with a telescope would have seen it? This hypothesis seems pretty outlandish and even more improbable. Also the delay is probably because the shuttle had to circle the earth to spiral out to the ISS's orbit...

[edit on 26-9-2007 by yellowcard]



posted on Sep, 26 2007 @ 11:37 PM
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Originally posted by MrPenny

Well, the first thing that occurs to me.....the period of time when it is not on the ISS, and is not on Earth....it is being transported. On other vessels.


And what vessels would those be?

The other secret space stations?!




posted on Sep, 27 2007 @ 02:18 AM
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Originally posted by yellowcard
If there is a secret space station, don't you think someone with a telescope would have seen it? This hypothesis seems pretty outlandish and even more improbable. Also the delay is probably because the shuttle had to circle the earth to spiral out to the ISS's orbit...

[edit on 26-9-2007 by yellowcard]


Oh dont say that !! Thats too obvious for all the 'secret space station' believers.
Their answer would be, 'its painted black'. Wow thats such an incredible answer isnt it. Only problem is, even if it was painted black green pink or chartreuse, it could still be seen during the day and would also show up on Radar.
"Oh its stealthy" they will say. Wow a stealthy space station.
And so it goes.

So the answer to the OP's original question:
'Did the Space Shuttle dock at the Secret Space Station tonight'

NO!
Because there is no 'secret space station'



posted on Sep, 27 2007 @ 04:58 AM
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Inventor plans 'invisible walls'
Invisibility cloak
The invisible material is made of thousands of tiny beads
The inventor of an "invisibility" cloak has said that his next project will be to develop the technology to allow people to see through walls.

Susumu Tachi, who showed off the cloak at an exhibition in San Francisco earlier this month, said he was hopeful of providing a way to provide a view of the outside in windowless rooms.

"This technology can be used in all kinds of ways, but I wanted to create a vision of invisibility," he told BBC World Service's Outlook programme.

"My short-term goal would be, for example, to make a room that has no outside windows appear to have a view to the outside, then the wall would appear to be invisible."

Use and misuse

Professor Tachi's cloak works by projecting an image onto itself of what is behind the wearer.

A computer generates the image that is projected, so the viewer effectively sees "through" the cloak.

Pilot looks out of his cockpit at snow
Invisibility material may allow pilots to see through the floor of their planes
The key development of the cloak, however, was the development of a new material called retro-reflectum.

"This material allows you to see a three-dimensional image," Professor Tachi said.

"This material is the key to our technology."

There are many potential uses of the cloak, ranging from espionage and military purposes to helping pilots see through the floor of the cockpit to the runway below.

However there are massive questions of potential misuse too, particularly surrounding the huge crime implications.

It would become incredibly difficult to spot a thief, for example, if the items they were taking were simply disappearing under the cloak.

Professor Tachi said that he had first had the idea of developing something to make objects invisible in 1977.

[...]


news.bbc.co.uk...

Video of it in action
www.star.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp...

So you put these beads into thermoprotective coating and wallah, nothing but stars.

[edit on 27-9-2007 by undo]



posted on Sep, 27 2007 @ 05:02 AM
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french find 16-20 secret satellites

I'm not a believer either way on the second space station and I would have to say that it doesn't make sense. If we have the ability to get to the moon in our "supa-secret" ships, why have a space station at all?

Purpose of the above link however is to play the devils advocate..

If the French claim these are all up there, how large would a "smaller" way-station-space-station be compared to any of these satellites..


b



posted on Sep, 27 2007 @ 05:25 AM
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Originally posted by Bspiracy
french find 16-20 secret satellites



Oh i particularly liked this quote:

"They told us, 'If we have not published it in our catalogue, then it does not exist.' So I guess we have been tracking objects that do not exist. I can tell you that some of these non-existent objects have solar arrays."



posted on Sep, 27 2007 @ 07:25 AM
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Originally posted by goosdawg
But you're unwilling to do the required research yourself.

You find it much easier to simply demand that someone else do your legwork for you.

How unfortunate.

Unwilling? Like someone has tasked me with it and I refuse? Hardly...its more like, not even remotely possible. I am not trying to establish the highly unlikely scenario. So, a certain amount of legwork, you'll do....but if I have specific questions that may point towards different circumstances....you won't do that. Does that sound right?


Those figures, of course, have already been covered by the information in the 34 page NASA/RSA document referenced in my previous post.


No, it does not. Apparently you did not read or comprehend your own submission. That document is a high level description of trash/waste handling procedures. At no point does it detail how much of a cargo's load is expected to be wasted or not used.

You have cited evidence twice now that does not answer the question.





The only scenario that requires the shuttle to rely upon ISS supplies, apart from electrical power while docked, is the shuttle's long term inability to return to earth.

And that scenario would be duly (and dually) covered by both the risk management plan in place for the ISS, and the shuttle mission's risk management plan.


Sure, I guess that's another way of saying what I said.

Originally posted by Me.
Don't forget, any good risk management plan would include increased supplies for any time frame the shuttle will be docked, considering the possibility it's stay may be extended due to unforeseen mechanical or weather related issues.




Sometimes the crew numbers seven on the shuttle.

It's debatable whether it ever actually "flies."


Go back to my post where I referenced the word "pedantic". Do you really think those count as points in this discussion?



Again with the demands!? Try saying please.
Besides, didn't Zorgon go over that already?


Please. Go get what I asked for.



You really didn't read that document, did you?

Do try to keep up, won't you?


Do you recall a post in which I said I'll tell someone when they are being a jerk? Heads up.

You didn't counter any single question I asked in a straight forward fashion. You repeated back to me, nearly verbatim, one of my own points.....very carefully pointed out that sometimes the shuttle has 7 crew members.....and suggested its "debatable" that it flies?......

Well, you write good sentences anyway.



posted on Sep, 27 2007 @ 08:36 AM
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reply to post by goosdawg
 


Your not coming off looking to good to anybody who actually reads this stuff and has at least half a brain.



posted on Sep, 27 2007 @ 09:28 AM
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A Progress cargo ship arrives with roughly 2.5 tons of cargo for the ISS. It leaves with roughly 2 tons of waste and trash destined to be burned up in Earth's atmosphere.

Gee whiz.....I've accounted for 2 tons of every cargo load in just a few minutes browsing.



posted on Sep, 27 2007 @ 10:14 AM
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Mr Penny, I was going to post that a while back, but was having too much fun reading all this absurd supposition from people that were spouting it from a place of total ignorance to do so. Plus, you know as well as I do it probably is falling on deaf ears, as they will say that the information is nothing but a cover-up anyway. You know, the convenient excuses they make for, well, ignoring the facts.

Very short, but very good post, Mr Penny!



posted on Sep, 27 2007 @ 12:08 PM
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The invisibility cloak guy has an entire list of projects his team is working on.
Check these out:

X'tal Vision
www.star.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp...
Optical Camoflage
www.star.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp...
Tactile Communication System
www.star.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp...
What you See is What you Feel
www.star.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp...

And there's the Seelinder  
Seelinder is a cylindrical 3-D display that allows multiple viewers to see 3-D images from any angle without wearing 3-D glasses. Each viewer sees appropriate images correspond to his own viewpoint and when he moves, images change smoothly and naturally.
360-degree display, light-field, ray-space, parallax barrier

More
www.star.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp...

[edit on 27-9-2007 by undo]



posted on Sep, 27 2007 @ 12:58 PM
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Duke university's invisibility cloak



Watch this video about Duke's invisibility cloak on HowStuffWorks. The first working "invisibility cloak" has been created by a team at Duke University's Pratt School of Engineering. See how this invisibility cloak works in this video from Duke University.

media.howstuffworks.com...



posted on Sep, 27 2007 @ 01:04 PM
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reply to post by undo
 


So yep I can accept they are working on an invisibility cloak and have one or two working prototypes for army use.
But you want people to make the leap from an invisibility jacket to an invisible Space Station?

Doesnt work for me, much though I would like it to be true.



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