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Lead Painted Toys, Faulty Tires, and Dirty Dog Food

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posted on Aug, 15 2007 @ 12:54 PM
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You have all heard about these.

On one side, you have the US requesting China devaluate their currency,..

On the other side you have China wanting open markets and threatening financial retaliation if the US puts Tarriff or restrictions on Chinese imports,..

And then you have the complacent US consumer, who doesnt really care where their products they desire are made, as long as they are cheap, and dont hurt their kids, their cars, or their pets.



What better way to bias the typical US consumer mindset than to create an environment where the products source country is tarnished and shows disregard to public safety and concern.

If your dog dies, if you get in a wreck in your car, and if your kids get lead poison, because of faulty products all over the news in a flurry, products from China, the public impression will be instilled to reduce the demand for Chinese products out of basic concern and protection of your family.

Works better than any tarriff, works better than restrictions on import, and works well to shift the consumer dynamic into spending into different more stable international economies.

Doncha think?




posted on Aug, 15 2007 @ 01:20 PM
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The Chinese president of the company that was responsible for the lead paint on those toys, reportedly committed suicide a couple of days ago.



posted on Aug, 15 2007 @ 01:48 PM
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I do not know if a smear campaign against Chinese goods would be effective. You have to look long and hard to find goods that are not made in China, so it is not as if consumers have a real choice between Chinese and other goods. Also, the origin of a good or its components may not be labeled and many may be under the false impression that the Chinese made goods they are buying are really made somewhere else.



posted on Aug, 15 2007 @ 02:39 PM
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China is on the learning curve of Capitalism,
they are not savvy enough to pass-the-buck on other 3rd world suppliers
like the adept managers of American 'grown-up' businesses have learned to do.

Give them time and they too will fleece the customers with marginally
safe products which are priced to what the market will bear rather than a
value basis...so the 'brains & manipulators' can reap their excessive Bonuses.

BTW, China has the Olympics next year, so the hoopla of the games will
regulate the news of tainted products made for U.S. markets...
a page 5 news item,
in a small inconspicuous location in most Lame-Stream-Media.....



posted on Aug, 15 2007 @ 03:28 PM
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My family and I have had our pets on real food diets for some time now. Not only is it better, you don't have garbage, the pets thrive on it. Even vets will discourage you from a real food diet because they want to sell you food, or their education has been been funded by a pet food company. Here is a blip from blog:



"There is nothing more hideous and insidious than the pet food company.And responbile owners are blissfully unaware of what they are giving to their pets.

The dog and cat food we are feeding our pets is garbage at best. Most people never take a look at the ingrediants, and what they represent.

Why did I title this Did you Know you a feeding Fifi to Fluffy? Because one of the ingrediants in pet foor is meat rendered dog and cat. Along with all the nasty stuff that remains of any stock animal that is processed. The math is simple: if you buy a steak, it will cost you several dollars depending on the steak or meat. Why then does a can of pet food only cost 40-50 cents. What kind of meat only costs several cents after shipping and markup by the retailer?

The remains of any processed animal goes into a meat rendering plant. Where it is piled on the floor, left to rot, mixed in with rats, snakes, maggots, and bugs. It is melted down to a large vat of fat. Dried, and then turned into pet food. It is a cheap way to dispose of unwanted animal parts. Not only is it cow, sheep, pig, or what have you. But it is dog and cat. Many animal control facilities dispose of euthanized, and unwanted pets by selling to these meat rendering plants. Which in turn, are put into pet food. Ever wonder what the ingrediant "meat by product" is? It would be hooves, bones, eyes, intestines, some organs, like reproductive organs. Reproductive organs contain a huge amount of hormones, naturally. But cow, sheep, or pig hormones are not necessarily good for a cat or dog.Not anymore than for a human. Cats especially have very delicate systems.

What else goes in there? Well, you have the euthanized cats and dogs. They don't remove the euthanization medicine. Which in turn, goes into the pet food. Chemicals that are used to kill pets in the first place.


According to: iml.jou.ufl.edu...


Reporter John Eckhouse was one of the first people to discover the practice of sending euthanized pets to the rendering plants.

He quoted an employee of Sacramento Rendering as saying, "Thousands and thousands of pounds of dogs and cats are picked up and brought here every day."

When a vet tells a grieving owner that they'll "take care" of their dead loved one, they usually mean sending it off with the disposal company for rendering. This is all perfectly legal. Many veterinarians and especially shelters don't have the money to bury or cremate animals.

Although many in the pet food industry deny that they use euthanized animals, proof that the practice goes on continues to surface.

Over a few years in the 1990's, veterinarians began reporting to the FDA/CVM that the drug they used for anesthetizing, and euthanizing, dogs—sodium pentobarbital—seemed to be losing its effectiveness.

This prompted the CVM to explore the most likely cause: animals were becoming immune to the drug because they had been eating food with trace amounts of sodium pentobarbital for years. The likely source of the drug in their food? Euthanized animals.

In 1998, the CVM went about testing dry dogs foods containing the ingredients meat and bone meal, animal digest, animal fat and beef and bone meal. They found the drug in 31 of 37 foods tested.

Two years later, they conducted a study to find the levels of the drug in parts per billion for each food. Some examples were:

* 32 ppb: Old Roy—Puppy Formula, chicken and beef
* 25.1 ppb: Heinz—Kibbles 'n Bits Beefy Bits
* 16.4 ppb: Super G—Chunk Style Dog Food
* 15 ppb: Weis—Total High Energy Chicken and Rice
* 11.6 ppb: Pet Gold—Master Diet Puppy Formulation
* 10 ppb: Old Roy—Puppy Formula, beef flavor


Note that these products may be free of this drug now, as these are the findings in 2000.


But I wouldn't be so sure.

Does any actual meat go in there? yes. Diseased animals that are too sick for humans. It is called the four Ds in the meat business
ead, dying, diseased and disabled. They toss the whole thing. Mad cow. double yum.
The other actual meat is the rancid leftover meat from the supermarkets. Styrofoam, plastic and all.As well as rancid and leftover restaurant grease.Don't forget roadkill. Nice fresh deer, possum, or armadillo. All staples of the dog and cat diet.

Then we throw in a whole bunch of rice and carbohydrates.Corn syrup is one of the additives.Corn syrup isn't good for us, and we are omnivores. Not very good for a meat eater. That is why diabetes among cats is rising, and is now at a whopping 1 in 400. Dogs can handle small amounts of carbohydrates. Cats, however, are meant to be strict meat eaters. I have never seen my cat carry back a bowl of rice.

The buck doesn't stop there. Within the animals, you already have antibiotics, anabolic steroids and growth promoting hormones. Then you have all the synthetic chemicals and preservatives such as ethoxyquin, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA).Other additives and preservaties that can be found are:

* Additives in Processed Pet Foods
* Anticaking agents
* Antimicrobial agents
* Antioxidants
* Colouring agents
* Curing agents
* Drying agents
* Emulsifiers
* Firming agents
* Flavour enhancers
* Flavouring agents
* Flour treating agents
* Formulation aids
* Humectants
* Leavening agents
* Lubricants
* Nonnutritive sweeteners
* Nutritive sweeteners
* Oxidizing and reducing agents
* pH control agents
* Processing aids
* Sequestrants
* Solvents, vehicles
* Stabilizers, thickeners
* Surface active agents
* Surface finishing agents
* Synergists
* Texturizers
* Information supplied bywww.takingthelead.co.uk...



The average dog can consume up to 26 lbs. or preservatives a year.

Here comes the scary part: not only does this rendered meat go into pet food. It is mixed in to the feed for the livestock and chicken feed. Not only are you feeding Fifi to Fluffy. We are eating fluffy ourselves.

Mod Edit: Quoting/Plagiarism – Please Review This Link.

Mod Edit: External Source Tags – Please Review This Link.

mod edit: I can't tell where your thoughts are versus the copy pasted stuff from other sites. Please do not do this again.


[edit on 8/15/2007 by Gools]



posted on Aug, 15 2007 @ 03:32 PM
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The point being is that it is not all of China's fault. Our own regulatory standards leave a lot to be desired.

Even cleaning chemicals contain toxic materials that aren't even required to be labeled by the companies, and is easily absorbed by our children.
es.epa.gov...

I posted that blog in Oct. 2006. So this is nothing new.


I don't buy my son a lot of toys. We do the old fashioned thing of playing outside.

What do peeps need to do? buy less junk. Use natural products, use organic products, and simply start leading a simpler life.



posted on Aug, 15 2007 @ 05:04 PM
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Oh yes, almost forgot the 'anti-freeze' toothpaste too.


I think one or two more high-profile 'faulty' items discovered and displayed as sold in America, will do plenty to cause the curtail of things people buy 'Made in China'.

Bet this happens in the next month or two, as the iron is hot and ready to strike.



posted on Aug, 15 2007 @ 07:09 PM
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Originally posted by smirkley
Oh yes, almost forgot the 'anti-freeze' toothpaste too.


I think one or two more high-profile 'faulty' items discovered and displayed as sold in America, will do plenty to cause the curtail of things people buy 'Made in China'.

Bet this happens in the next month or two, as the iron is hot and ready to strike.



What makes me wonder, is it that is it one faulty item that caused everyone to check their products just in case? And if there hadn't been pet food or toothepast, would there have not been an issue and products never tested?

So how many previous items might have contaminants?



[edit on 15-8-2007 by nixie_nox]



posted on Aug, 15 2007 @ 07:21 PM
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Well Said! (smirkley, nixie_nox) Seems there is more to the stories than meets the eye. Thank for pointing it out. The all mighty dollar?



posted on Aug, 15 2007 @ 10:07 PM
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Originally posted by JupiterJustice
The all mighty dollar?


Well we all remember what happenned to Firestone when just ONE of their products was found to be faulty, the company dang near went out of business.

Now we are talking several products, and targeting one countries economy. It doesnt take rocket science to see the potential impact on an economy artificially propped up, after their primary consumers of their manufactured products begin to shy away for fear of safety on many levels.

PR goes both ways, and damage control is more expensive and harder to pull off many times.



posted on Aug, 16 2007 @ 08:44 PM
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Originally posted by smirkley

Originally posted by JupiterJustice
The all mighty dollar?


Well we all remember what happenned to Firestone when just ONE of their products was found to be faulty, the company dang near went out of business.

Now we are talking several products, and targeting one countries economy. It doesnt take rocket science to see the potential impact on an economy artificially propped up, after their primary consumers of their manufactured products begin to shy away for fear of safety on many levels.

PR goes both ways, and damage control is more expensive and harder to pull off many times.


Companies are capable of weathering bad PR storms. Exxon (oil spill), Pepsi (syringes in cans), Chilean fruit (grapes laced with cyanide), Jack in the Box (E Coli oubreak) have all had bad press, yet they have been able to weather the storm and are still profitable. Similarly, it is highly likely China will be able to weather the storm.



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