It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

The Masonic Pinecone?

page: 1
3
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 14 2007 @ 11:40 AM
link   
a174.ac-images.myspacecdn.com...

i took this picture inside a local masonic temple the entire cieling of the first floor wich is open to the public is adorned with these, does anyone have any insight into the pinecone beyond its representation of phi?




posted on Aug, 14 2007 @ 11:45 AM
link   
Thats a new one on me.I'll leave this to the few masons we have as members.I'm sure it means something other than just decoration, but I do not know what.I have not seen a pinecone used in masonic symbology before.I hope you get an answer.



posted on Aug, 14 2007 @ 12:05 PM
link   
Hi..not a mason but I have read alot of books. The pinecone is symbolic of the Pineal Gland, or third eye. I think that the masons believe your connection to God is through opening your third eye and letting the light of God infuse you. The Pineal Gland looks exactly like a miniature pine cone henceforth the symbolism. There is something about the PHI Ratio in all that as well but thats the basics I think.



posted on Aug, 14 2007 @ 12:28 PM
link   
interesting idea considering the masons did fund dr Rick Strassmans study of n,n dimytheltriptamine at the university of new mexico wich is believed to originate in the pineal gland



posted on Aug, 14 2007 @ 12:45 PM
link   
Maybe this will help:

"Operative Masonry, in the fullest meaning of that term, signifies the process by which the Eye of Horus is opened. E. A. Wallis Budge has noted that in some of the papyri illustrating the entrance of the souls of the dead into the judgment hall of Osiris the deceased person has a pine cone attached to the crown of his head. The Greek mystics also carried a symbolic staff, the upper end being in the form of a pine cone, which was called the thyrsus of Bacchus. In the human brain there is a tiny gland called the pineal body, which is the sacred eye of the ancients, and corresponds to the third eye of the Cyclops. Little is known concerning the function of the pineal body, which Descartes suggested (more wisely than he knew) might be the abode of the spirit of man. As its name signifies, the pineal gland is the sacred pine cone in man--the eye single, which cannot be opened until CHiram (the Spirit Fire) is raised through the sacred seals which are called the Seven Churches in Asia."

altreligion.about.com...



posted on Aug, 14 2007 @ 12:54 PM
link   
From Mackey's Encyclopedia of Freemasonry...


PINE-CONE

The tops or points of the rods of deacons are often surmounted by a pine-cone or pineapple. This is in imitation of the Thyrsus, or sacred staff of Bacchus, which was a lance or rod enveloped in leaves of ivy, and having on the top a cone or apple of the pine: To it surprising virtues were attributed, and it was introduced into the Dionysiac Mysteries as a sacred symbol.

www.phoenixmasonry.org...



posted on Aug, 14 2007 @ 01:04 PM
link   
im finding this all extremely intrigueing considering or at least from what ive been told that in masonic buildings the cieling is set to represent the divine/above and the floor usually a chessboard as the mundane/below.



posted on Aug, 14 2007 @ 01:49 PM
link   

Originally posted by ConspiracyNut23
From Mackey's Encyclopedia of Freemasonry...

PINE-CONE

The tops or points of the rods of deacons are often surmounted by a pine-cone or pineapple.


I have the book, but never read that before (and certainly have never seen it!). Has any other Mason ever seen this on a deacon's rod?

In my jurisdiction, which was also Mackey's, the Senior Deacon's rod is surmounted by the Square and Compass with a shining sun in the center. The Junior Deacon's is the same except the sun is replaced by a crescent moon.

[edit on 14-8-2007 by Masonic Light]


Cug

posted on Aug, 14 2007 @ 02:56 PM
link   

Originally posted by mindash
i took this picture inside a local masonic temple the entire cieling of the first floor wich is open to the public is adorned with these


Was the building always a Masonic building? I have looked into the history of a local Scottish rite building (because it's cool looking) only to find it was built as a christian church.

The building now belongs to the local civic theater.


[edit on 8/14/2007 by Cug]



posted on Aug, 14 2007 @ 04:05 PM
link   
no its an official scottish rite masonic temple heres a pic of part of the outside, too big to get the whole thing

mindash.bluesphereweb.com...



posted on Aug, 14 2007 @ 06:16 PM
link   

Originally posted by Masonic Light

Originally posted by ConspiracyNut23
From Mackey's Encyclopedia of Freemasonry...

PINE-CONE

The tops or points of the rods of deacons are often surmounted by a pine-cone or pineapple.


I have the book, but never read that before (and certainly have never seen it!). Has any other Mason ever seen this on a deacon's rod?

In my jurisdiction, which was also Mackey's, the Senior Deacon's rod is surmounted by the Square and Compass with a shining sun in the center. The Junior Deacon's is the same except the sun is replaced by a crescent moon.

[edit on 14-8-2007 by Masonic Light]


Heya ML, in my jurisdiction the Jnr Deacons rod is topped by a "Horn of plenty" and the Snr Deacon is a Dove. I too have never seen a Pine cone atop a deacons rod.

Dredz



posted on Aug, 14 2007 @ 06:42 PM
link   
Here is some interesting info...

On the variance and use of rods (once again proving how varied and un-universal Freemasonry can be).

www.masonicworld.com...

My Grand Lodge uses black rods for Deacons, White Rods for Stewards... Here is a web page that shows the tops:

www.theeastwardtraveler.com...

I could see how the Stewards rod heads could be mistaken for a pine cone, but it's really just a guard to protect the cornucopia.



posted on Aug, 14 2007 @ 07:04 PM
link   
The Freemasons aren't the only ones to use the pinecone.

There is a giant pinecone on the lawn at the vatican, and you will frequently see pics of the pope's staff with a pinecone on the tip of it.

There are said to be some pinecones in northeastern america that can only open by fire. This being also symbolic of the pineal gland which is represented by the pinecone which is said to open through the fire up the spine.

There is also an ancient carving depicting Ahura Mazda as holding a pine cone, pointing it away from himself.

[edit on 14-8-2007 by interestedalways]



posted on Aug, 14 2007 @ 07:18 PM
link   
This link mentions the pinecone and the pomegrante as being symbolic of the pineal gland according to the Masonic tradition the author speaks of.

It begins on page 64 and the reference is towards the bottom of page 68 under the subheading of *the seventh center*

www.gknape.com...



posted on Aug, 14 2007 @ 07:24 PM
link   
The pine cone is certainly not a traditional masonic symbol, and has never been used (even historically) in Craft masonry.

As you have seen this in a Scottish Rite temple, it is possible that there has been a meaning ascribed to it within the Scottish Rite. Not being a member I wouldn't know.

With regards to the deacons' wands, in England they are surmounted by a dove (which is the badge of the office). The cornucopia is the badge of office of the Steward, and denotes 'plenty'.



posted on Aug, 15 2007 @ 04:56 AM
link   
what exactly is the scottish rite in comparison to the masons and any knowledge of their symbolism namely this pine cone? anyone



posted on Aug, 15 2007 @ 06:58 AM
link   



I have the book, but never read that before (and certainly have never seen it!). Has any other Mason ever seen this on a deacon's rod?

In my jurisdiction, which was also Mackey's, the Senior Deacon's rod is surmounted by the Square and Compass with a shining sun in the center. The Junior Deacon's is the same except the sun is replaced by a crescent moon.



In our lodge they are just blue staffs with the tip painted white.



posted on Aug, 15 2007 @ 07:25 AM
link   

Originally posted by mindash
what exactly is the scottish rite in comparison to the masons and any knowledge of their symbolism namely this pine cone? anyone


The Scottish Rite is one of various Rites of Masonry. In the USA, there is the Scottish Rite and the York Rite that one can join after becoming a Master Mason.

To the best of my memory, I do not recall the pine cone being a symbol in any of the degrees, either Scottish or York.



posted on Aug, 15 2007 @ 09:29 AM
link   
Here is a link from ebay which lists throw rugs for Masonic temples.

It does indicate an interest by Freemasons by the use of the symbol, if only as a rug.

cgi.ebay.com...

[edit on 15-8-2007 by interestedalways]


Cug

posted on Aug, 15 2007 @ 10:34 AM
link   

Originally posted by interestedalways
Here is a link from ebay which lists throw rugs for Masonic temples.

cgi.ebay.com...


What? That's a bath mat!

Masonic throw rug indeed. oh look they sell Masonic pinecone soap dishes as well.



new topics

top topics



 
3
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join