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High Radiation Detected in back of Car in Jersey City

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posted on Aug, 13 2007 @ 09:24 PM
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No - even though sound is my profession too - I didn't actually hear it (my ears are not what they used to be) but I could see something 'odd' was going on - either that or I was watching the world's worst reporter...

I'm impressed! Better get more people in here to 'hear' this...

J.

[edit on 13-8-2007 by jimbo999]




posted on Aug, 13 2007 @ 09:33 PM
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Hmmm...well I guess no-one from Jersey City frequents ATS then, huh?

J.

[edit on 13-8-2007 by jimbo999]



posted on Aug, 13 2007 @ 09:42 PM
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I just e-mailed that fox station and reporter asking for an explanation and offering my analysis of the audio in any format. The MP3's I posted sound crappy compared to what this sounds like in wav format on my studio monitors. The original audio I downloaded was MP3, but I worked on it as a wav file. If anyone's interested I would be willing to email wav files of this as well. To me sounds like "Tell them there's no radioactivity"...Andy



posted on Aug, 13 2007 @ 09:50 PM
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Originally posted by Crakeur
seems there was a box marked radioactive material in the trunk of a car in an accident and the kid driving the car works for a company who takes soil samples

www.nj.com.../base/news-4/1186984899277260.xml&coll=3

and

www.nj.com.../base/news-4/1186984899277260.xml&coll=3


I read the brief articles these links went to, but these seem like CYA to me. They go so far as to say that the local news blew this out of proportion. Comes across as blaming the local-yokels for making a big stink of nothing. I saw the report, I saw Rob Malcolm change his tune in mid-song. I heard why...Andy



posted on Aug, 13 2007 @ 10:03 PM
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Originally posted by slackerwire
People in the geotechnical engineering field use what is called a Nuclear Density Gauge to determine the density of the soil being tested in order to determine if the soil is capable of holding certain weights.


Thank god someone else at least knows enough to piece together the truth from the outright lies and occlusions of reality prevalent in the media. I used to work in the geotechnical field doing various soil tests and concrete inspection.

I had to wear a radioactive badge at all times around the NDGs because of insurance reasons. You would send in the badge monthly to get tested and would get back a report of your exposure (they kept track of your total exposure for as long as you worked.)

When the probe is properly stored in the housing the radiation emitted was negligible according to our scintillator. If the probe was damage so that it couldn't be fully retracted or left in an unsafe position it could be potentially unsafe if exposure was for extended periods.

More information about NGDs:
Information on NDGs from University of Washington

Personally, I would be pissed off if some over-paid security guard with a tin-badge wasted my time because his fancy geiger counter bleeped as strolled past my work vehicle. I think before you give these idiots tools you should at least tell them about perfectly legal and expected sources of radiation.

Nah! That kind of training wouldn't fit with their operating agenda of, "Fear everything you don't understand."

Jon



posted on Aug, 13 2007 @ 10:07 PM
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Ha I used to do that a few years ago, the 118 degree summers we have out here made it a really crappy job. Even though the money was good, it didn't make up for heat stroke every day.



posted on Aug, 13 2007 @ 10:46 PM
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Thanx for the analysis guys it was great..I am so happy you have these talents and despite the tools that disinfo or PC agents have. Gee they should have just given the mike to the cops and let them broadcast it seems that the world is going to be a little better when either a hoax is deconstructed or a real story is pulled back out from under the rug. On one hand they tell us to be on alert, on the other don't ask questions. I hope even if this one turns out to be routine, that powers that be understand that it really is no longer business as usual.

SyS



posted on Aug, 14 2007 @ 12:19 AM
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Originally posted by dgtempe

I'm thinking of opening up a Koran Shop of my own. I have a feeling i could make some good money since we need to flip to that book...in order to survive.

Seriously,, i wonder how much a Franchise would be?

/


You take internet orders yeah?
I dont know of a single place that sells the koran in my isolated village.



posted on Aug, 14 2007 @ 12:22 AM
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To me it sounds like the reporter is being told to downplay it. Why? Probably because it was no big deal, and they didn't want to alarm the public. Responsible journalism, imo.

The thing that I don't understand is why the driver took off running. But that, too, could have a normal explanation, like stolen car, or no driver's license, etc.



posted on Aug, 14 2007 @ 12:41 AM
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I'm mostly interested in the fact that a live, on the scene reporter is being given direction by someone elsewhere. Wouldn't it stand to reason that the guy on the scene has the most up to date info? I'm most curious about who was giving him information which contradicted what he had just said, and from where that individual got that information. Andy



posted on Aug, 14 2007 @ 12:45 AM
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Well, he had just arrived on site, according to the female anchor, and it is very likely that the TV station had been receiving input from multiple sources while he was enroute, and thus had some up-to-date information to give to him.



posted on Aug, 14 2007 @ 01:06 AM
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Originally posted by jsobecky
Well, he had just arrived on site, according to the female anchor, and it is very likely that the TV station had been receiving input from multiple sources while he was enroute, and thus had some up-to-date information to give to him.


That sounds plausible. I've emailed the station about this, as I mentioned earlier, and it would be nice to get clarification about exactly what went down direct from them. I'm not holding my breath, but if I hear from them, I'll post it. Andy



posted on Aug, 14 2007 @ 01:15 AM
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i walked into a building we were repairing after lunch break through a side door, couldnt find anyone so i went outside through the front and everyone was looking at me like i was a ghost. apparently one of those radioactive density thingys you guys are talking about was being used in the parking gargage below the building. no one was supposed to be in the building.



posted on Aug, 14 2007 @ 01:31 AM
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Originally posted by jimbo999
Hmm..well, it would be pretty helpful if the reporter on the scene could actually speak english! Maybe he was excited or panicky? It was pretty damn hard to make sense of a lot of what he was saying - most sentences just didn't make much sense.

J.


No kidding. I could never stand to listen to that guy on the air. I don't know how the heck he even got a job as a reporter.

Anyway, the enhanced soundbyte definitely says "Tell them there's no radioactivity."



posted on Aug, 14 2007 @ 01:35 AM
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If you look at that guy's cred's, he used to play in the NFL I believe. Then went to sports reporting, and now trying to go "legit" on real news. Andy



posted on Aug, 14 2007 @ 03:05 AM
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Text This Kind of Post and news article busts me out laughing.

Some of you folks are a work of art. I dont think most of you realize how many people in any given town or city are involved in taking radioactive samples or carry sample or calibration sources around with them daily.
It is also not a knowlege that is wont to be regularly disseminated to the general public.

Within about a 30 mile circle of this location there are about 7 to 10 nuclear reactors in different states of operation at any one time. I dont think most folks stuck on a diet of the LA Lakers/Redskins and American Idol even realize this. Isn't this the pre season time??

It is quite natural for samples to be taken daily. Also the equipment used for testing is calibrated with radioactive sources of different kinds. Some of them highly radioactive such as the one used for testing gamma alarms to the small ones used for calibrating counters. This small source is carried around in a wooden box. The gamma alarm source is in a locked can with a carrying handle about the size of a can of bean and franks...but heavy and shielded.
Equipment used to "Frisk out" needs to be calibrated regularly. So does a walk in portal monitor.

Same with that soil sample tester mentioned in the storys on Page1. I am not surprised that someone is carrying a "source" around with them.

There is alot of non destructive testing/x-raying which goes on around here with radioactive sources from radium sources to cobalt sources. These need to be seriously respected. Especially that cobalt source. You can gauge how heavy/powerful the source is that is being used by how much area they cordon off to keep people out when X-raying. Not a bright idea to tresspass..deliberately or in ignorance behind these cordon ropes or boundarys.
Most radium sources Ive seen can be carried by one man..heavy/bulky container but one man can carry it.
Cobalt source..different story. Much larger and heavier container...moved by a crane....carefully. Both of these are No S--T sources.....especially the cobalt source.

You guys hear a story like this and you are ready to abandon ship. LOL LOL..the rest of you are looking for someone to blame.

Lord.. I hope we never have a Katrina around here and have to depend on people like some of you.

"I'm a Victim!! I'm a Victim!!"

By the way ..the poster on page 1...and ALARA....correct...exactly. Well said..well said!! As Low As Reasonably Achievable.

That is precisely what they teach us.

Ive picked up a bit over 400mr this year. Not alot compared to others. I will be going back in the reactor soon for more. Guess what?? I am not shaking in my boots or calling the local news station in fear.

Ive been around materials which are highly "crapped out" Contaminated. Hot too!! Or as we say in the trade...."Smoken Man!!"

When you decontaminate materials which are highly crapped out..you do so with a strict regimen/proceedure so as not to spread the contamination. Both you and the radiation tech taking readings are counting on each other not to be stupid and spread rather than capture/contain the contaminated particles. You dont need lightweights around. You need people with a attention span who are not easily spooked.
Same thing with working in a glove bag...you know...ie..Dana Scully et al.
YOu dont panic or lose your cool...get frustrated.

One thing you dont do in a situation like this is panic or wet your britches. People and team members are counting on you to stick to your training.

That is why you dont need the public around you who dont know anything or are easily spooked or afighted. Same with a reporter who only knows how to get a headline or ratings.

Knowing all this does not make me better than other peoples... but it does make me different.

The fear mongering in this story cracks me up. Lightweights!!

I think Tom Bedlam is most likely correct in this story.

Orangetom

[edit on 14-8-2007 by orangetom1999]



posted on Aug, 14 2007 @ 04:43 AM
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Most of us know that there is a lot of raidoactive materal out there. But here is a story of what one person did with it. It is a good read if you have not read it before.


He was determined to irradiate anything he could, and decided to build a neutron "gun." To obtain radioactive materials, David used a number of cover stories and concocted a new identity.

He wrote to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), claiming to be a physics instructor at Chippewa Valley High School. The agency's director of isotope production and distribution, Donald Erb, offered him tips on isolating and obtaining radioactive elements, and explained the characteristics of some isotopes, which, when bombarded with neutrons, can sustain a chain reaction.

When David asked about the risks, Erb assured him that the "dangers are very slight," since "possession of any radioactive materials in quantities and forms sufficient to pose any hazard is subject to Nuclear Regulatory Commission (or equivalent) licensing."

David learned that a tiny amount of the radioactive isotope americium-241 could be found in smoke detectors. he contacted smoke-detector companies and claimed that he needed a large number for a school project. One company sold him about a hundred broken detectors for a dollar apiece.

Not sure where the americium was located, he wrote to an electronics firm in Illinois. A customer-service representative wrote back to say she'd be happy to help out with "your report." Thanks to her help, David extracted the material. He put the americium inside a hollow block of lead with a tiny hole pricked in one side so that alpha rays would stream out. In front of the block he placed a sheet of aluminum, its atoms absorb alpha rays and kick out neutrons. His neutron gun was ready.

The mantle in gas lanterns, the small cloth pouch over the flame, is coated with a compound containing thorium-232. When bombarded with neutrons it produces uranium-233, which is fissionable. David bought thousands of lantern mantles from surplus stores and blowtorched them into a pile of ash.

To isolate the thorium from the ash, he purchased $1000 worth of lithium batteries and cut them in half with wire cutters. He placed the lithium and thorium ash together in a ball of aluminum foil and heated the ball with a Bunsen burner. This purified the thorium to at least 9000 times the level found in nature, and up to 170 times the level that requires NRC licensing. But David's americium gun wasn't strong enough to transform thorium into uranium
sorce



posted on Aug, 14 2007 @ 04:49 AM
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'When the probe is properly stored in the housing the radiation emitted was negligible according to our scintillator. If the probe was damage so that it couldn't be fully retracted or left in an unsafe position it could be potentially unsafe if exposure was for extended periods.'

But if this was as innocent as that - why would the driver of the car try to make a run for it when confronted?? (as mentioned in the report?)

J.



posted on Aug, 14 2007 @ 04:53 AM
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Originally posted by drumist69
I'm mostly interested in the fact that a live, on the scene reporter is being given direction by someone elsewhere. Wouldn't it stand to reason that the guy on the scene has the most up to date info? I'm most curious about who was giving him information which contradicted what he had just said, and from where that individual got that information. Andy


Good job Andy - sterling work. Yeah - it doesn't make sense to me either. What field of the industry are you in, if you don't mind me asking? Sound engineer? I think the MP3 is pretty damning enough - although like you, I know only too well about the shortcomings of the MP3 format - WAV is 10x more accurate..

Regards,

J.

[edit on 14-8-2007 by jimbo999]



posted on Aug, 14 2007 @ 04:57 AM
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Originally posted by drumist69
If you look at that guy's cred's, he used to play in the NFL I believe. Then went to sports reporting, and now trying to go "legit" on real news. Andy


That's if you can call FOX 'real' news, that is
heheh...

J.



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