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Housing Electrical Question

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apc

posted on Aug, 12 2007 @ 08:57 PM
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I'm sure this is not to code, but are there any other problems with this setup?



That's a cold water pipe tied to a bus bar with 10awg to feed 14awg ground to multiple outlets.

Thanks in advance.




posted on Aug, 13 2007 @ 07:46 AM
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There is a bigger questions here. Is it safe? What I think I see here is a single phase 110v A/C circuit. My question is - What do the three wires hook up too, are they supply or are they the load side of that terminal? Is there electricity there? If you have a volt meter you can check that yourself.

Grounding or going to earth is not uncommon. You may see that done with water heaters. As far as is it up to code. Depends on where you live. If you live outside of city limits the codes or different than living inside city limits. Even with that there are strict codes to deal with.

My advise, call a bonded, licensed electrician. Believe me spending the money on having your house wired correctly is worth it. No need to burn the place down.


apc

posted on Aug, 13 2007 @ 07:56 AM
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It's all just ground. Place is about forty years old and had a bunch of three-pronged outlets missing ground. I get 120V between hot and my new ground as expected.

Safety is what I'm looking for... I'm assuming cold water pipes are good grounds. All the fuses are 30A which I plan on reducing to 15A anyway. So as long as this ground can take 15A to blow the fuse without melting anything I hope to be good to go.

[edit on 13-8-2007 by apc]



posted on Aug, 13 2007 @ 08:23 AM
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With those three wires being ground, then bonded to the cold water pipe, you should be disco. Cold water pipe does work for grounding or going to earth. Thats important, because there is a differnce between ground and neutral in a A/C circuit or any circuit for that matter.


apc

posted on Aug, 13 2007 @ 12:17 PM
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Sweet deal.

Yeah my bag is microelectronics... low voltage stuff or extremely high voltage stuff. This housing wiring is new territory for me. Wanna make sure I'm not doin anything that would make an electrician go, "NOOOOO!!!"

Thanks!



posted on Aug, 14 2007 @ 06:49 AM
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i know what you mean. i work as an electronic technician on a drill ship. i know all about some ohm's law, but wiring a home can be tricky because of codes. it isn't the wiring thats difficult, but it's knowing the codes. that way you don't get into trouble.




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