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An Ancient Fortress on a Siberian Island (pics)

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posted on Aug, 10 2007 @ 04:58 PM
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An Ancient Fortress on a Siberian Island (pics)


englishrussia.com

Deep inside Siberia there is a lake, one of thousands others. And in the middle of this lake there is a small island. And on this island people have found an ancient fortress, which is dated more than 1500 years old.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Aug, 10 2007 @ 04:58 PM
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Has anyone heard anything about this? Was there an ancient civilization in Siberia that we have not known about?

englishrussia.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Aug, 10 2007 @ 05:33 PM
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Read some of the comments and you will see a link to a Wikipedia article about Bayanchur Khan.

Also, that place is called, today, Por Bajin, and the lake I think it's called Tere-Kol.



posted on Aug, 10 2007 @ 06:00 PM
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ArMaP's right, here's the google maps link from the comments section. I'm going to see if i can get it up on google earth. Pretty cool pictures though thanks for the find. Seems to be a pretty inhospitable place to build a fort, if thats what it is.

link to google maps


Por-Bajin - stronghold in the Eastern Siberia, built in the VIII century A.D. on an island of lake Tere-Hole. Some consider this stronghold to be a temple and call it 'Russian Shaolin'. Others believe that this construction serves as the northern gates to sacred place Schambala. Por-Bajin is translated form Tuva language as 'clay house'. It's mostly built of clay bricks. The monument has complex structure - inside the regular rectangle of walls there is a whole labyrinth of buildings, which look like as a buddhistic or induistic temple. The walls forms the regular rectangle with side sizes 211x158 metres. ...


Interesting enough to look into further.

cheers mojo



posted on Aug, 11 2007 @ 01:28 AM
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am i the only one who thought "photoshop" when first viewing these pictures?



posted on Aug, 11 2007 @ 04:56 AM
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Originally posted by Sacreligion
am i the only one who thought "photoshop" when first viewing these pictures?


i thought the same thing,so much history out there and questions to answered about our past,nice pics but still not sure tho



posted on Aug, 11 2007 @ 04:59 AM
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Definitely a photoshop job, I wish I could remember were the ruins shown inserted are from but I have seen a Pic with them before.



posted on Aug, 11 2007 @ 06:12 AM
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Originally posted by mazzroth
Definitely a photoshop job, I wish I could remember were the ruins shown inserted are from but I have seen a Pic with them before.
Even if those are not the real ruins, they are consistent with satellite photos of the area, didn't you saw the Google maps link? And it's also visible on Google Earth.



posted on Aug, 11 2007 @ 07:25 AM
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Originally posted by mazzroth
Definitely a photoshop job, I wish I could remember were the ruins shown inserted are from but I have seen a Pic with them before.



the 'ruins' on the google map link from MoJo,

look like 'typical' ruins in the middle east,
the Essene community @ Quam Rum?, an aerial view of Masada?
even the Casa Grande at Phoenix SaltRiver ruins of Hohokum people?


the "in-hospitable" place we see today...
but was it that way back aound 700 AD?
maybe there was a 50-100 year era when that lake environment was less
than a frozen, siberian landscape...and a group of the devout tried to establish a sanctuary away from the noisy masses of humanity



[edit on 11-8-2007 by St Udio]



posted on Aug, 11 2007 @ 05:00 PM
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Definitely not a photoshop job. I located it on Flash Earth at 50 36' 54.2"N 97 23' 64.0" E. You can see the outline of the fortress on the island in the satelite photos.
Siberian Fortress



posted on Aug, 11 2007 @ 05:51 PM
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the question is more prevalent: WhyTH would it be a photoshop job? Are we getting so paranoid that we cannot even accept when a completely valid discovery is made, just because it defies our current model?

Oh, wait. I forgot that the Archaeological community as a whole is that blind. Silly me.



posted on Aug, 11 2007 @ 05:54 PM
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Originally posted by D.E.M.
the question is more prevalent: WhyTH would it be a photoshop job? Are we getting so paranoid that we cannot even accept when a completely valid discovery is made, just because it defies our current model?
Oh, wait. I forgot that the Archaeological community as a whole is that blind. Silly me.


I thjink the reason being that it looks so 'Middle Eastern' and not what one would expect from something in Siberia.
I have to admit that my first glance brought up the idea that I had seen it before. Yet even on fuzzy Google Earth it shows up.



posted on Aug, 11 2007 @ 06:19 PM
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Wikipedia suggests Por-Bajin along with 16 other garrisons were built by Bayanchur Khan around 750AD due to a threat from the North.

link to 2 wikipedia pictures



Bayanchur Khan died soon after ending his successful expedition against "wild people" or tribes of the Sayan Mountains in 759 A.D., during a feast devoted to this victory. Por- Bajin was among seventeen brick forts that had been erected during that and previous khagan expeditions ( 751, 756 ) in Tuva with permanently stationed garrisons to guard the sources of the Yenisei River and northern borders of the Khaganate. The purposes of these expeditions were a neutralization of the emerged and permanently growing threat from the North - an allegation which proved to be fatally true in 840 A.D., when the Uyghur Empire collapsed.



posted on Aug, 11 2007 @ 06:25 PM
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Originally posted by D.E.M.
the question is more prevalent: WhyTH would it be a photoshop job? Are we getting so paranoid that we cannot even accept when a completely valid discovery is made, just because it defies our current model?

Oh, wait. I forgot that the Archaeological community as a whole is that blind. Silly me.
I don't get it, do you mean to say that those people who said this is a photoshop job are archaeologists and they said it just because it goes against what they believe?

Or do you mean something completely different? It wouldn't be the first time I completely misunderstood something.



posted on Aug, 11 2007 @ 07:54 PM
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Originally posted by ArMaP

Originally posted by D.E.M.
the question is more prevalent: WhyTH would it be a photoshop job? Are we getting so paranoid that we cannot even accept when a completely valid discovery is made, just because it defies our current model?

Oh, wait. I forgot that the Archaeological community as a whole is that blind. Silly me.
I don't get it, do you mean to say that those people who said this is a photoshop job are archaeologists and they said it just because it goes against what they believe?

Or do you mean something completely different? It wouldn't be the first time I completely misunderstood something.


I think he is being sarcastic
Archaeologists make a discovery yet some people refuse to believe it and deem it a photoshop. (i think)



posted on Aug, 11 2007 @ 08:08 PM
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I find it difficult to believe that the locals just happened to stumble upon this fortress recently and didn't know that it was already there. Anybody living in the area would be quite familiar with this thing. Maybe that part of the story isn't entirely accurate. The story isn't very long or insightful.

I don't see why there might not be an iron age fort there that has been preserved. Hey, if they can still dig refrigerated mammoths out of the ground, why not?

I don't think it has anything to do with Atlantis. I say it's King Arthur's legendary Camelot. Just to be different.



posted on Aug, 11 2007 @ 08:22 PM
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I found a couple of references to it being "Schambala", the gateway to a legendary lost city, but there is nothing on wikipedia and the only links that pop up on google are in russian.
Anybody know anything about this "Schambala".



posted on Aug, 11 2007 @ 10:47 PM
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en.wikipedia.org...

Misspelling, perhaps?



posted on Aug, 12 2007 @ 02:41 AM
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Thanks D.E.M, if this is what they are referring to how do you think a sanskrit legend gets mentioned in relation to a garrison in Siberia? Thats a hell of a long way from the original source.

wikipedia


Shambhala (Tib. bde 'byung) is a Sanskrit term meaning "place of peace/tranquility/happiness". Shakyamuni Buddha is said to have taught the Kalachakra tantra on request of King Suchandra of Shambhala; the teachings are also said to be preserved there. Shambhala is believed to be a society where all the inhabitants are enlightened, actually a Buddhist "Pure Land", centered by a capital city called Kalapa. An alternative view associates Shambhala with the real empire of Sriwijaya where Buddhist master Atisha studied under Dharmakirti from whom he received the Kalachakra initiation.



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