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Masons Invitation

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posted on Aug, 29 2007 @ 02:44 PM
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Originally posted by mindash
.... and from what i gather it seems that freemasonry is very tied to this concept but as i said seeing all of those whom are already a part of it that i know and seeing the kind of people they are i have to question if this is something i truely want to be a part of.


Freemasonry is made up of people with diverse interests and backgrounds. You find people that are really into the history and symbolism, and many people that aren't (and don't care to learn). For every "Masonic Light" or "Axeman", there are 100 people that are just there for fellowship and community work. I don't necessarily think that's a bad thing.


Originally posted by mindash
as well as being very financially set i dont have quite the funds one must have to join wich


I'm not sure where you live, but my lodge dues are $96 per year. That's not a lot of money. The majority of the people in my lodge I would classify as "working class" or "middle class" people.


Originally posted by mindash
.... it shouldnt be a factor in my opinion as far as elegibility for membership goes,


It's not a factor, unless the yearly dues (they do vary from place to place... my little town in Kentucky is probably cheaper than a lot of jurisdictions, maybe some of the other Masons here can give you an idea) are too expensive. Charity should never be at the expense of your family or your own obligations, obviously... Also, I would add that charity comes in many forms -- "cash" is only one of them (and probably the least satisfying from a personal standpoint).




posted on Aug, 29 2007 @ 03:44 PM
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reply to post by JustMe74
 


very much thanks for your insight and for clearing some things up for me. im not sure on yearly dues but i think the initial fee for joining memebership if im certain i could be wrong tho is around 250$ if not more where im located and i couldn't agree more as far as charity being offered in more forms than just money. as well it does make sense as far as those being interested in the symbology and those being interested in the community aspects ect but manya mason i know seems to be to be attuned to neither and the only thing i ever see them doing really is attending meetings and then getting drunk so it could just be the area in wich im located in or the few people that i know of as masons being the thorn on the rose or just a small part of the whole that doesnt live up to its own standards wich occurs in everything. i may have worded that badly but i think i've put across my thoughts in general. thank you again



posted on Aug, 29 2007 @ 04:11 PM
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Originally posted by mindash
very much thanks for your insight and for clearing some things up for me.


You're very welcome.


Originally posted by mindash
im not sure on yearly dues but i think the initial fee for joining memebership if im certain i could be wrong tho is around 250$ if not more where im located


It's possible; best way to find out is to ask. In my area, it varies from lodge to lodge. A portion of the dues goes to the Grand Lodge, and then the individual lodge charges some amount of money on top of that.


Originally posted by mindash
manya mason i know seems to be to be attuned to neither and the only thing i ever see them doing really is attending meetings and then getting drunk


I don't know; Freemasonry in the US has a strange attitude towards drinking, in my opinion. Lodges more or less started out in the US by meeting in taverns, before there were formal lodge buildings. One can only assume that there was a good amount of drinking going on. However, after Prohibition, every lodge went "dry" (like the rest of the country). Even after prohibition was lifted, this anti-alcohol sentiment has pretty much carried over to this day.

It's certainly possible that some Masons in your area are exhibiting some un-Masonic qualities (I'd say an excess like public drunkenness is something that I'd consider un-Masonic), but that is not the norm in US Freemasonry, at least based on what I've seen.



posted on Aug, 31 2007 @ 06:27 AM
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Yes it is the same way at my lodge. None of the brothers that are active members at the lodge a go to drink very often if at all. That is based on being around them and things like that. One time we did have a few brothers visit from England that asked what pub we went to after the meeting. It could be like you said and maybe some of the brothers sway from some of the masonic beliefs.



posted on Aug, 31 2007 @ 09:57 AM
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Originally posted by timinem
Yes it is the same way at my lodge. None of the brothers that are active members at the lodge a go to drink very often if at all. That is based on being around them and things like that. One time we did have a few brothers visit from England that asked what pub we went to after the meeting. It could be like you said and maybe some of the brothers sway from some of the masonic beliefs.


Could be more of a cultural thing, too. I mean, you're not likely to find a bar in a Lodge in the bible belt; but up in the Northeast, they're like "No bar?! NO BAR?!"

There's nothing worng with having a couple of drinks. Sometimes after lodge in Texas we would go to this place downtown for burgers and beer, fellowship etc. JustMe is right; after prohibition, most lodges kept the attitude. Hell, in Arkansas, you can't even be involved in the sale or distribution of alcohol, period -- it's an automatic blackball. If you own a liquor store, for example, the lodge will not accept your petition. Weird, IMHO.



posted on Aug, 31 2007 @ 11:10 AM
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Thus, the reason for the "Shrine" which despite all its philanthropic works.....is considered the "Playhouse" of Masonry, where you can go and have a tall glass of "Camel's Milk". But in regards to Alcoholic drinks, i have found or remember nothing in all the various oaths and obligations that I have taken that EXPRESSLY FORBIDS the imbibing of alcoholic beverages...there are some that admonish against excess however



posted on Aug, 31 2007 @ 05:37 PM
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Originally posted by PrinceHall06
Thus, the reason for the "Shrine" which despite all its philanthropic works.....is considered the "Playhouse" of Masonry, where you can go and have a tall glass of "Camel's Milk". But in regards to Alcoholic drinks, i have found or remember nothing in all the various oaths and obligations that I have taken that EXPRESSLY FORBIDS the imbibing of alcoholic beverages...there are some that admonish against excess however


I agree completely. In the Old Charges, it is said that one of the duties of the Junior Warden is oversee the Craft during Refreshment, and to guard against intemperance.

This is speaking of back in colonial days when Lodges were held in taverns, and the JW was supposed to keep folks from getting drunk. My Grand Lodge has no express written law against alcoholic beverages in theory, but in practice everyone would scream bloody murder if a more liberal brother such as myself were to bring in a cold Killian's.



posted on Sep, 2 2007 @ 11:35 PM
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Originally posted by Masonic Light
I agree completely. In the Old Charges, it is said that one of the duties of the Junior Warden is oversee the Craft during Refreshment, and to guard against intemperance.


We still use it.

Can you remember what replaced this section of the JW's Charge in your jurisdiction?



posted on Sep, 3 2007 @ 12:16 AM
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By all means your father should become a mason.

There are few things in life that can be counted on, one of those is the fact that in most any country, you can find a mason.

The obligation of a master mason when needed in life is something to be thankful for.

His family will also benifit from his masonic ties in times of crisis, all one has to do is merely ask.

The brothers of the lodge shall provide for masons in distress, their widows and orphans.



posted on Sep, 4 2007 @ 03:45 PM
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Originally posted by Appak
Also, if one reviews one's obligations it is interesting to note that no ritual that I have EVER read says "I furthermore promise and swear that I will not solicit membership."


agreed, but I also believe there's something in there about where you first found Masonry, and it was "in my heart." Doesn't have the same meaning when you were led into joining, as opposed to truly coming on your own.



posted on Sep, 4 2007 @ 10:08 PM
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Originally posted by Roark


We still use it.

Can you remember what replaced this section of the JW's Charge in your jurisdiction?


None of the Old Charges have been replaced in my jurisdiction, but this particular one has lost any relevance since alcoholic beverages are prohibited....however, I suppose it could apply to the cheesecake.



posted on Sep, 5 2007 @ 08:09 PM
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Originally posted by Masonic Light
In the Old Charges, it is said that one of the duties of the Junior Warden is oversee the Craft during Refreshment, and to guard against intemperance.

This duty is alive and well in Merrie Old England, where the bar is an integral part of the masonic experience. But then this is not a surprise, as the bar is integral to Merry England as a whole.

Bringing alcohol into the lodge room itself would be quite unheard of, but once the brethren have gone from labor to refreshment the gloves (quite literally) are off. I can't imagine two hours hard labor in the temple to not be followed by an ice cold beer, but then on the other hand the steaks available here put the wimpy-ass offerings in Blighty to shame.

When I have explained this important masonic tradition to brethren after a meeting here, despite the Prohibitionist nature of American masonic meetings there is curiously no shortage of volunteers to join me in after-proceedings elsewhere. And we're not just talking a swift Half either.



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