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DeClawing Cats

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posted on Jul, 24 2007 @ 02:57 PM
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I am stuck with a problem.

I have just built a new home and bought all new furniture. My three babies (Cats) are currently in possession of all of their claws. On the farm at my old place, that was never a problem as we had old furniture and just let them have their way with it. Now however we really don't want them tearing up the furniture if we can help it.

We just had their nails covered with "Nail Caps" but that is really aggravating them and I have no idea how long it is going to last.

I have looked into DeClawing but I have heard it is painful and I DO NOT WANT MY BABIES HURT. They have a laser DeClawing place here, but still it is the same as removing "our" fingernails. That does not even feel good thinking about it.

Has anyone had any experiences they can share with me to help in my dilemma? Any and all input is welcome...


By the way MODS.... I was completely unsure of what forum to put this in, if I chose poorly, please fix it for me. Thanks

Semper




posted on Jul, 24 2007 @ 03:02 PM
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There's a discussion going on about this here:

www.belowtopsecret.com...

In short, if you care about your cats DON'T get them declawed, it's more like amputating the end of a finger than removing a fingernail. Just keep them clipped, once every week or two should be fine.

[edit on 7/24/2007 by djohnsto77]



posted on Jul, 24 2007 @ 04:07 PM
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I understand your pain semp.

I've got two "babies" of my own, and declawing them was something my girlfriend and I have considered on a few occasions. Our furniture, while not brand new, is rather expensive and has been taking a beating over the last two years that we've had the cats. Both of them have focused on one arm of our chair, and have pulled it apart quite nicely actually.

I don't think I can bring myself to ever declaw them, but I did break out for a buck and buy a squirt bottle to spray them with water when they do begin to scratch the furniture. It has helped a lot actually, but is still far from perfect. When we are not home, I can't say for sure if they are digging or not. But while we are home, they rarely do.

So a squirt bottle is always an option, or put some sort of plastic over parts that they tend to aim towards, which will be quite uncomfortable for them if they were to scratch it. There are scents that you can buy, but I found them to be more of a nuisance than anything. My nostrils burnt while the cats seemed to enjoy it.



posted on Jul, 24 2007 @ 05:05 PM
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get it done....no big deal....pain meds for a few days and they'll be fine and none the wiser.....you will hear a ton od opinions but if you want to deal with putting them nail covers on and still possibly getting your furniture or your skin carved up, go for it....
not realy my style....i always declawed my cats



posted on Jul, 24 2007 @ 05:31 PM
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Do your cats ever go outside? If so, definitely don't declaw them. They need their claws to survive encounters with other animals.

I have always declawed my cats. It's painful, yes, as any surgery is, but after they heal from the surgery (like any of us) there is no more pain. If you do declaw them, front claws only, please. If they ever sneak outside, they'd be defenseless without any claws.

It's a controversial subject, just like docking tails and cropping ears (which I'm against because it's for aesthetics instead of practicality) but each owner has to do what's right for him.



posted on Jul, 24 2007 @ 05:40 PM
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Originally posted by Benevolent Heretic
It's painful, yes, as any surgery is, but after they heal from the surgery (like any of us) there is no more pain.


How do you know they don't suffer chronic pain after such a surgery?

I have had surgery on my arm due to a radial head fracture which never healed, and it it still painful. In fact, I had to get a second surgery on it. And it is still painful. I'll be taking pain killers for the rest of my life because of it.

The surgeries I had were actually less destructive than cat declawing surgery.



posted on Jul, 24 2007 @ 05:47 PM
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Sorry BH I have to disagree. They have those claws for a reason. To declaw them is to disarm them. Take the time to train them, that's what's needed. chissler's right. A squirt bottle works wonders for training cats. Even if they are an indoor cat, they WILL get out. Don't leave them defenseless.



posted on Jul, 24 2007 @ 05:50 PM
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I'm not a vet, so I have to rely on what every vet has ever told me.


Semper, this site might help you decide. But as I said before (Intrepid), if the cat is EVER outside, declawing should NOT be considered an option.

Declawing and Alternatives



MYTH #6: The post-operative period involves tremendous pain

The declawed cat will indeed have sore feet after surgery. The larger the cat, the more the discomfort and reluctance to bear weight. Pain relievers are often prescribed. However, this recovery period should not last longer than a week or so. Healing should be complete by two weeks.

It is not normal for a cat to have chronic pain after declaw surgery.



posted on Jul, 25 2007 @ 02:05 AM
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They are strictly inside babies, but for me the issue is my imagination in someone removing my fingernails...

Freaks me out and then when I think about it being done to them, well let's just say I am REALLY soft in my old age....

I just got a squirt bottle, thanks Chissler, and WOW it really scoots them away when you get em' not looking.

I guess in a way, torn furniture is a really small price to pay for the love and attention they give me every day..

Thanks all for the advice....

Semper



posted on Jul, 25 2007 @ 02:47 AM
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Train them to use a cat scratching pole, buy one or make one yourself.

Makes sure your punish them when you see them scratching anything except the "cat scratching pole. Protect your furniture during the training period.

Read up some Cat books for more information and details on how to do this.

It worked for me, but I have forgotten how I got it done as it was many many years ago.

Some cats learn watching others, some are just thick. I might have trained my cats to use the scratching pole but have failed to train them to use the toilet bowel. I gave up on that one.

But the scratching pole one should be relatively easy, hope that your cats are smart or you might have to sit on furniture protection for a very very long time.



posted on Jul, 25 2007 @ 08:07 AM
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Originally posted by ixiy
Train them to use a cat scratching pole, buy one or make one yourself.


This is a must! And you can use catnip to attract them to it.
They have lots of cool things for cats to scratch on these days.

Good luck Semper!



posted on Jul, 25 2007 @ 08:31 AM
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Originally posted by djohnsto77

The surgeries I had were actually less destructive than cat declawing surgery.


sorry but don't compare human surgery to declawing a cat.

when i was 20 i had a spinal fusion done. they took out my disc at L5S1 through my belly and replaced with with a bone from my hip, a cadaever bone and a titanium cage...it failed and i am in chronic pain to this day and am on a variety of meds.....

we gonna compare that to getting a cat declawed?

sure, there is always the off chance that there will be a complication with anything....declawing is an easy, routine procedure.

you come out of your pocket with meds to put them under and pain meds after and they are fine.

also, this is much different than cropping ears or docking tails....those are for aesthetics.



posted on Jul, 25 2007 @ 08:34 AM
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Originally posted by intrepid
Sorry BH I have to disagree. They have those claws for a reason. To declaw them is to disarm them. Take the time to train them, that's what's needed. chissler's right. A squirt bottle works wonders for training cats. Even if they are an indoor cat, they WILL get out. Don't leave them defenseless.


they don't need that defense as an inside cat...you don't know they WILL get out.
a squirt bottle don't always work and you can't use that when you are gone....also don't forget the fact that with claws they can teat you up...they are razor sharp, unlike a dogs.

in the other thread i posted vids of people getting tore up. i gave the story of how my wife got tore up when she got the vacuum out. it was not even on...cat saw it and tore into her.....

i like how some make is sound...they are gonna be defenseless and poor them....

small price to pay. no claws but they get a warm roof, food, love, etc....yeah, thats fair.



posted on Jul, 25 2007 @ 08:38 AM
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Originally posted by semperfortis
They are strictly inside babies, but for me the issue is my imagination in someone removing my fingernails...

Freaks me out and then when I think about it being done to them, well let's just say I am REALLY soft in my old age....

I just got a squirt bottle, thanks Chissler, and WOW it really scoots them away when you get em' not looking.

I guess in a way, torn furniture is a really small price to pay for the love and attention they give me every day..


certainly not trying to talk you into it but one day when you come home and your furniture is more than a little torn or they get ahold of your arm and do more than tear it up a little, you will think differently.


watch this...actually, listen to his screams




[edit on 25-7-2007 by Boondock78]



posted on Jul, 25 2007 @ 08:40 AM
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I find that applying lot's and lot's of crazy glue to their feet works wonders! Yep, they try and stick out those claws and they can't! It's perfect! Yeah!

On a serious note. The older the cats get, the more intense the pain of declawing. I have 2 myself, and they're both declawed. The vet gave us pain meds. We needed to use shredded newspaper in lieu of cat litter for several days. Literally after 3 days, they were right back to normal. However it was a little funny to watch them look at their newly declawed paws. You could almost hear them thinking "Hey, what happened. I was able to scratch things a couple of days ago!"



posted on Jul, 25 2007 @ 08:46 AM
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thats what i said in the last thread...meds, shredded paper for litter and they are fine in a couple days.....it is NOT the big deal people make it out to be...calling it cruelty and such...

not cruel though KEEPING them as pets though eh?

do what you will. post pics of the lacerations when they rock you



posted on Jul, 25 2007 @ 10:12 AM
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Our cat isn't declawed.

We don't really have problems with her in the sense of injuring people, but she is a very mellow cat. And well she never really scratchers her claws against any of the furniture...

Well my mom is a cat lover and she also has tons of antique furniture in the house shes one of those people...and she hasn't declawed the cat so...



posted on Jul, 25 2007 @ 03:50 PM
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As far as my babies "hurting" me, they are just babies.... I play rough house with Pebbles, the other two are far too mellow, and Pebbies, as I call her, has left me some interesting marks sure enough. Yet anyone that has ever really enjoyed playing "rough" with a dog or cat, has the same "honor marks" and I am pleased that Pebbies is playful enough to give them to me.

In essence my decision to declaw or not declaw would never be predicated on a fear of my babies.

As for being cruel keeping them as pets.. HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

I only wish I had it as good as they do.... Gourmet food, different kinds every night, new toys every week or so, expensive beds and climbing facilities and free doctor care all the time. They come and go around the house as they please and even have their own window now where they like to lay in the sun. Yeah, that is really cruel.. LOL

I think after reading as much as I have and all of your "Mostly" wonderful comments, I will let them keep their claws. I want to keep my fingernails and well, it only seems fair. Plus what is the price of a new couch compared to the love I get from them every day...

Thanks all

Semper



posted on Jul, 25 2007 @ 03:56 PM
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Yeah, Semper, I can see you spoiling those "babies".


Mine are a bit spoiled. Here's the cattery we built for them so they could feel like they're outside:






posted on Jul, 25 2007 @ 05:51 PM
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Semper no mattter how it is done they take off the first knuckle or joint. It's kind of like saying that you don't want finger nails, even if you pull them out they grow back, but if you cut the first joint or knuckle off you don't have to worry about your finger nails.

I opted not to get my cat done years ago.

I am not sure about the laser procedure.

Here is some info I found.

Declawing a Cat.com


Regards,

RT

[edit on 25-7-2007 by Realtruth]



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