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Alarm at U.S. right to highly personal data

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posted on Jul, 23 2007 @ 09:57 AM
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Highly sensitive information about the religious beliefs, political opinions and even the sex life of Britons traveling to the United States is to be made available to US authorities when the European Commission agrees to a new system of checking passengers.

The EC is in the final stages of agreeing a new Passenger Name Record system with the US which will allow American officials to access detailed biographical information about passengers entering international airports.

In a strongly worded document drawn up in response to the plan that will affect the 4 million-plus Britons who travel to the US every year, the EU parliament said it 'notes with concern that sensitive data (ie personal data revealing racial or ethnic origin, political opinions, religious or philosophical beliefs, trade union membership, and data concerning the health or sex life of individuals) will be made available to the DHS and that these data may be used by the DHS in exceptional cases'.


src: observer.guardian.co.uk...

OK all you left wing, gay, atheists, your being monitored now more than ever. So any philosophical beliefs, union activity and your sex life are crucial to DHS making the right judgment on passengers entering airports. Wow. Its one thing to seek out criminal backgrounds but what do your sexual preferences have to do with anything. Further it appears the records will be kept for 15 years and are available to 3rd party sources. Be very careful what you disclose and to whom. Your best to keep your private life just that, private.

brill




posted on Jul, 23 2007 @ 10:00 AM
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Aren't there UK laws which prohibit unlawful search and seizure? Because that's what this is...seizing your personal information without probable cause.



posted on Jul, 23 2007 @ 10:03 AM
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Its called the

Data Protection Act

www.opsi.gov.uk...



posted on Jul, 23 2007 @ 10:06 AM
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Originally posted by uberarcanist
Aren't there UK laws which prohibit unlawful search and seizure? Because that's what this is...seizing your personal information without probable cause.


Good question, can't say I know much about UK law. I would think though that in the name of terrorism this could be seen as just another means of averting potential problems. I can understand an expect some degree of profiling but really where is this going. Once its in the hands of other 3rd parties who knows you just may not get that job your seeking because of political affiliations or your pro-union. Just plain wrong.

brill



posted on Jul, 23 2007 @ 10:07 AM
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Originally posted by Chorlton
Its called the

Data Protection Act

www.opsi.gov.uk...


So, ah, how is this law legit then? Or is it not and will it probably be rejected in a court challenge?



posted on Jul, 23 2007 @ 10:09 AM
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Well I dont really know how the EU will get hold of all that personal information anyway unless they use the Police records, which AFAIK is illegal.

The US wont get my details, I have no intention of visiting the US ever again, at least whilst they require my fingerprints and photo.



posted on Jul, 23 2007 @ 10:10 AM
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Originally posted by Chorlton
Its called the

Data Protection Act

www.opsi.gov.uk...


Thanks Chorlton

Just skimming through it it would appear if there's reasonable grounds that a crime could be detected this might hold water.

brill



posted on Jul, 23 2007 @ 10:19 AM
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It also appears that there's a weaselly catch-all "national security" exemption.



posted on Jul, 23 2007 @ 10:49 AM
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Well, it has gotten pretty bad if they can get hold of detailed medical records now.

I remember going through immigration procedings at the US Embassy in London back in 2000. You basically had to fill them in on what you could as far as your medical history was concerned and give them evidence that you'd had your required shots, etc.

Now, before I left to move to the US I asked my GP (General Practitioner) if it was possible for me to get a copy of my medical records to take to the US with me so when I got signed up with a new doctor I wouldn't have to try and remember every last thing. He told me then that not only could I not get a copy, but he couldn't get a copy either; it went to the Department of Health and stayed there.

No so now, apparently



posted on Jul, 23 2007 @ 10:53 AM
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Originally posted by uberarcanist
Aren't there UK laws which prohibit unlawful search and seizure? Because that's what this is...seizing your personal information without probable cause.


I am just surprised they do not ask males there erection size before they enter the usa, nowadays. hahaha. I wonder does erection size go into profiling people. lol

They must have so much information on everyone, already. Say if they recorded all the details of your day, in a computer text file. That file for every day would be very small, considering todays storage capabilities.

[edit on 7/23/2007 by andy1033]



posted on Jul, 23 2007 @ 11:29 AM
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If I were a lawyer, I think I could successfully argue that this measure should be thrown out. You see, the UK says that disclosure of this highly personal info is illegal without warrant unless it serves a law enforcement or national security purpose. And it could not serve either unless it was used for profiling. And I could produce expert witness after expert witness to testify that profiling is useless in both contexts.



posted on Jul, 23 2007 @ 11:37 AM
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But I still cant see how the EU is going to get hold of this information in the first place?



posted on Jul, 23 2007 @ 11:46 AM
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Ladies and Gentlemen, allow me to present you the new-look Gestapo, remodelled and rebuilt for the twenty-first century...

*extensive drum roll*

The Department of Homeland Security!

Ve haff vays off making you tork



posted on Jul, 23 2007 @ 11:59 AM
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Much as I hate to do it, the US is now off my visit list until things change. Means I'll not see my brother and his family and friends for some time but I just don't see being treated like a criminal as appealing. I'm sure there are many others in Europe who are thinking the same thing and going elsewhere.
The European governments would not dare just come out and tell the citizens that they are going to provide information to a foreign power (there are still some in europe who may just revolt and kick the leaders out of office )

My personal information is just that, private and personal. It is nobody elses business but mine and certainly not to be shared with people or organisations I do not know. However, I'm sure there are government lawyers looking for interpretations of the laws and carefully placed loopholes to allow this.

Anyone attempting to enter a country with illegal / hostile intentions is going to do so somewhere quiet, away from the official entry points to avoid detection. So, all the excuses they put forward for these measures can easily be shown to be a complete crock!



posted on Jul, 23 2007 @ 12:05 PM
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One has to wonder if there is a small margin of deliberate intent played out here. The US appears to be retracting somewhat by endorsing not only these measures but actively tightening up immigration. I get the impression that she wants to enter a phase of isolationism and judging from some of the responses here I'd say its working.

brill



posted on Jul, 23 2007 @ 12:10 PM
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Spot on brill, I was thinking the same thing. Is the US government trying to discourage visitors and US citizens from leaving? For what reasons we can only speculate but there must be something behind all these measures other than the officially trotted out soundbites regarding terrorism and security.



posted on Jul, 23 2007 @ 12:30 PM
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You know even when this littler things comes and go and many of them give us a way to joke and laugh at it. . . is actually the way our nations would be conducting business as the NWO takes hold.

Don't worry is all for the good of the people and to keeps us safe.
or so they say.



posted on Jul, 23 2007 @ 12:38 PM
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Originally posted by marg6043
You know even when this littler things comes and go and many of them give us a way to joke and laugh at it. . . is actually the way our nations would be conducting business as the NWO takes hold.

Don't worry is all for the good of the people and to keeps us safe.
or so they say.


Your right Marg it is nothing to joke about, but the reality is that as individuals there is little choice. You either submit and in some cases for business people its the only way, or you forfeit your rights. If you surrender your freedom in the fight to maintain freedom you have lost. Can someone remind me who's winning the war on terror again ?

brill



posted on Jul, 23 2007 @ 03:26 PM
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It's been awhile, but I thought Britain wisely opted out of the Shengen agreement? I know they check passports when you enter UK from the continent, and vice-versa, but not between other EU countries. The article keeps mentioning EU passports, I knew the Swiss, being not of the EU, had their own and thought the UK did too?

Does the government in the UK not need a subpoena to access health records if you use NHS instead of private care? That's understandable, but kind of rough. But... how would they know about the average person's sex life... assuming they didn't catch something?



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