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Feds building massive biometric database on Iraqis

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posted on Jul, 13 2007 @ 06:04 PM
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Feds building massive biometric database on Iraqis


www.usatoday.com

The U.S. military is increasingly combating the Iraqi insurgency with a non-lethal yet effective weapon: identification. U.S. troops are creating a database with hundreds of thousands of records of Iraqi adult males, which they can use to conduct quick background checks and identify potential troublemakers
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.cfr.org
www.usatoday.com




posted on Jul, 13 2007 @ 06:04 PM
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Just testing out the hardware over there before they begin to impliment it over here.
Biometrics, its the future of security dont you know.
Oh! You dont want the retna scan or the fingerprint?
Then hows-about this here chip in your hand?

www.usatoday.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jul, 13 2007 @ 06:42 PM
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You got that right 11Bravo.... We will be next, It's like those small TALON robots they used over there, and NOW they are used here...


This calls for a John Titor quote lol:

John Titor:

However, there are a great many “non lethal” weapon systems in development that turn out to be quite lethal.



posted on Jul, 14 2007 @ 02:13 AM
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A move like this is about three years to late but other wise it is an smart move. Anything that can help to separate the enemy from the local population and helps to restrict there freedom of movement is an good thing.



posted on Aug, 5 2007 @ 09:03 AM
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Originally posted by xpert11
A move like this is about three years to late but other wise it is an smart move. Anything that can help to separate the enemy from the local population and helps to restrict there freedom of movement is an good thing.


So cataloging hundreds of thousands of innocent until proven guilty Iraqis is a good thing huh?
Perhaps we should catalog the whole world huh?

How about this for a strategy, leave them alone in their own land.
WHat a novel approach.
Then we could afford to repair the American bridges that are in such bad shape they just collapse.



posted on Aug, 5 2007 @ 10:42 AM
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the link says that the Iraqi people ''give little resistance" to the data/ID collection by US soldiers.


we have data collection here already, the Census each decade,
then if you want to Vote or Drive or Hunt or buy Guns
or visit a National Park, & etc


if your a nuisence or do criminal activity, the police & courts
collect even more data on you,
besides the fingerprints on record if you served in the military
or held a security clearance...

we have all layers of personal data collection on ourselves...
what makes Iraqi residents so special?
what your saying is that 'cataloging hundreds of thousands of innocent until proven guilty Iraqis..." is an idictment ...and not a safety & regulation need?
we should not do anything to help protect both our troops and the peaceful, law abiding Iraqis...
for want of infringing on the privacy of a secret-combatant....a spy & saboteur in their midst... willing to plant bombs in Mosques or food markets
in a countrywide war-zone...
wow



posted on Aug, 5 2007 @ 12:45 PM
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Originally posted by St Udio
the link says that the Iraqi people ''give little resistance" to the data/ID collection by US soldiers.

Maybe they did and maybe they didnt.
Do you expect the article to say "the Iraqis are fighting this tooth and nail, but we are going ahead with it" ?



we have data collection here already, the Census each decade,
then if you want to Vote or Drive or Hunt or buy Guns
or visit a National Park, & etc


yeah, maybe you didnt read the article. There is no biometrics involved with the census, or voting, or driving or hunting.
What we are talking about here is...

Fingerprints and iris scans — known as biometric data — form the foundation for reliable identification records. Iraqis are added to the database when they are determined to be insurgents, found near attack sites or detained. Other Iraqis have been scanned at their homes, their workplaces, or at checkpoints.





besides the fingerprints on record if you served in the military

I was never fingerprinted in the military. Where did you get this information?


we have all layers of personal data collection on ourselves...

Again, apples and oranges.
When was the last time you had a retna scan my friend?
Or the last time you were fingerprinted?


what makes Iraqi residents so special?

Well thats simple.
Its thier country
not to mention we are not the worlds police.
The armed forces are for the protection of the United States and to see them being used as the worlds police makes me sick.


we should not do anything to help protect both our troops and the peaceful, law abiding Iraqis...
for want of infringing on the privacy of a secret-combatant....a spy & saboteur in their midst... willing to plant bombs in Mosques or food markets
in a countrywide war-zone...
wow


Well your world view is pretty limited.
The insurgents keep coming......from other countries.
How is a biometric database of hundreds of thousands of Iraqis going to stop insurgents coming from foreign lands? Oh thats right, it isnt.
You want to know the best way to protect our troops?
Another easy answer.
Bring them home



[edit on 5-8-2007 by 11Bravo]



posted on Aug, 5 2007 @ 01:26 PM
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the only thing obvious

without going into a point by point rebuttal exercise

is that we.....are diametrically opposed
so-be-it


thanks



posted on Aug, 5 2007 @ 02:20 PM
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Originally posted by St Udio
the only thing obvious

without going into a point by point rebuttal exercise

is that we.....are diametrically opposed
so-be-it


thanks


So I take that to mean you have never had a retna scan or been fingerprinted.



posted on Aug, 17 2007 @ 10:18 PM
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Can I ask who here on this board has had a retna scan or been fingerprinted?

I will be the first to say that I have been fingerprinted because of an arrest I had when I was 17.
For anybody curious I coldcocked a guy that slapped a girl in front of me.
He pulled a knife, I walked away, then HE called the cops on me for assault.
So there is my fingerprint story.
I was never fingerprinted in the military like another poster tried to claim, and I have never had a retna scan.
So chime in guys, who has been fingerprinted and who has had a retna scan?
Is this something that people would be O.K. with here in the U.S. of A?



posted on Aug, 18 2007 @ 12:28 AM
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Originally posted by 11Bravo
Can I ask who here on this board has had a retna scan or been fingerprinted?



I was medically retired in '01,

the final ID card I received, I used my thumbprint on a computer and got my new mil id within 10 minutes, no wait...

I thought it was cool at the time but as of today I cannot remember being printed....

maybe that computer thingy was not matching, but taking my print.....

I don't know. but until now I haven't thought about it.

BTW the id card I am referring to was issued at Ft Story, Virginia spring/summer 01.



posted on Aug, 18 2007 @ 07:01 AM
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Originally posted by JacKatMtn
maybe that computer thingy was not matching, but taking my print.....


Well I guess I stand corrected then, because yes my friend, you have been fingerprinted.
The new fingerprinting is inkless and done on a computer.
Digital fingerprint scanner

I did not know this was something they did in the military.
I dont remember ever being fingerprinted, but I ETSed in 91.



posted on Aug, 18 2007 @ 07:31 AM
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Originally posted by 11Bravo
So cataloging hundreds of thousands of innocent until proven guilty Iraqis is a good thing huh?
Perhaps we should catalog the whole world huh?


Well its a hell of a lot better then not restricting the enemy freedom of movement. Freedom of movement amongst the local population is something that the insurgency relies upon. Denying the enemy freedom of movement is a step towards improving the security situation in Iraq.

Gee why not at least give a measure like this some support ?
It not like there are current measures in place that mean that such a scheme isnt needed. If something like this was done people would complain that the US wasn't doing anything like this.



How about this for a strategy, leave them alone in their own land.
WHat a novel approach.


Nah the best option would be to partition Iraq along tribal lines but that wont happen and political events will most likely lead to you getting your way.

[edit on 18-8-2007 by xpert11]



posted on Aug, 18 2007 @ 10:25 PM
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Originally posted by 11Bravo
[Well I guess I stand corrected then, because yes my friend, you have been fingerprinted.
The new fingerprinting is inkless and done on a computer.
Digital fingerprint scanner

I did not know this was something they did in the military.
I dont remember ever being fingerprinted, but I ETSed in 91.


That looks like it is exactly the same machine they used to fingerprint me at Miami MEPS last year. Very cool device, I hadn't seen anything like it before. Throughout the whole three hours or so I was there I appeared to be the only person to enter the fingerprinting room so it was obvious they were not fingerprinting everyone who was being processed. But like St. Udio was getting at, not every position requires a clearance.

As far as I know they are not stored on a computer because the folks there made it abundantly clear that I was not to bend the print outs (they gave me a special folder) and my recruiters also made it very clear that I was to get two copies of them. The lady messed up on the form the first time they ran me through the machine and without skipping a beat she immediately shredded the first failed attempt before I could ask if I could keep them (as a souvenir, they looked pretty darn neat.) Seems kind of a waste to have it computerized but not store them, but it doesn't really matter to me.

I was fingerprinted when I took the LSAT (Law School Admission Test), I had to give a thumb-print at least a dozen times for speeding tickets, and when I was a child the Blockbuster video chain offered an identification "kit" where parents could take their kids to be fingerprinted and video taped speaking different phrases (for the media to air if I went missing or something, I guess) I have no idea who has those fingerprints, and was too young to care or remember. Oh yeah, a field trip in elementary school to the local police station every kid was fingerprinted - I think it was a gag, but again I was too young to remember or care at the time, who knows - anything is possible.

I don't see any reason why fingerprints or at least a thumb print shouldn't be on driving licenses or passports. I mean, for a fingerprint to have any utility it's gotta be matched to a latent so as long as you're not exploring crime scenes (or creating them) it seems like a good idea to me, and I wouldn't resist it in the least.



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