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buried treasures!! Are some cursed?

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posted on Jan, 10 2004 @ 06:48 PM
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All of us have dreamt at one time or another of being a "big time treasure hunter," an Indiana Jones on a treasure hunting adventure. There are no doubts that ancient treasures and artifacts are still buried beneath earth or desert sand, just waiting to be found.

So my question here is!!

Do you belive that evil spirits guard some types of treasure?

Can it really be possible that the owners of the past treasures have the power after life to haunt anyone who dares go near its treasure?

Or can it just be old made up storys to prevent the treasure hunters of old times from searching ?




posted on Jan, 10 2004 @ 06:51 PM
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big curses were with the egyptian things that they have found.. Somethinglike 7 people who found something or reather in some ancient egyption tomb which said if opened a curse woul dbe on them and they would die relatively soon...all died relatively soon afterwards in diferent ways.



posted on Jan, 10 2004 @ 06:53 PM
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Originally posted by DaRAGE
big curses were with the egyptian things that they have found.. Somethinglike 7 people who found something or reather in some ancient egyption tomb which said if opened a curse woul dbe on them and they would die relatively soon...all died relatively soon afterwards in diferent ways.



That would be the curse of King Tut's Tomb.

www.mummytombs.com...



posted on Jan, 10 2004 @ 06:57 PM
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well...the legend of Cortez' Gold is true.

I'll find the link and post it for ye

Gryff



posted on Jan, 10 2004 @ 07:01 PM
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Rumor 5: Most of the people present at the opening of the tomb met untimely deaths. Again, Vornholt writes that "13 of 20 people who were present at the opening of King Tut's burial chamber died within a few years." Vornholt does not give his source for this information, but it is clearly incorrect. The truth is that the newspapers at the time had a field day with the curse. Whenever anyone related to Carnarvon or the discovery of the tomb died, the death was taken as proof that the curse was in effect.


However, Egyptologist Herbert E. Winlock examined the evidence some 12 years after the tomb's opening. Of the 26 people present at the opening of the burial chamber, only 6 had died within the next 10 years. When King Tut's sarcophagus was opened, 22 of the 26 people were present, but only 2 of them had died within 10 years afterward. Finally, only 10 of the 26 people had watched the unwrapping of the mummy. And none of them had died within the next decade! In fact, many of the people who had the most contact with the king's mummy lived long and productive lives.



Thanks all i had was rumours; P



posted on Jan, 10 2004 @ 07:06 PM
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The 'rumors' on King Tut's Tomb and the opening of it were possibly proven as simple folk-lore and 'rumor':

"No Tutankhamun Curse - it's Official"
Link:
www.abovetopsecret.com...


Seems a "ancient fungal spores are called Aspergillus genus. The deaths and sickness's were caused by inhalation of these spores. These spores are very toxic and if untreated, result in death" were the causes of the deaths.



regards
seekerof



posted on Jan, 10 2004 @ 07:09 PM
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Here is one that is supposed to be buried in Bedford County, Va. complete with code to break, Enjoy!
unmuseum.org...



posted on Jan, 10 2004 @ 09:23 PM
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I have been researching the "Lost Dutchman Mine" and the lost "Jesuit Treasures" for several years now. From the 1870's thru the 1950's at least 150 people died looking for the Lost Dutchman. Most of these were shot between the eyes, and some were beheaded. Most will agree that spirits do not use firearms so I believe we can rule out curses on this one. Most folks believe the deaths were revenge of a group of Apaches called the "Black Legion" defending the home of their ancient gods and burial sites. The Apache religion did not allow for gold to be possesed and when prospectors or army were killed and gold was found it was returned to a special place within the Superstition Mountains. Gold acquired on raids to banks and ranches was also returned to this special place in the mountains. It is possible for this stash to be cursed due to the religious significance to the Apaches.



posted on Jan, 10 2004 @ 09:31 PM
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Originally posted by Gryffen
well...the legend of Cortez' Gold is true.

I'll find the link and post it for ye

Gryff


Well, of course it's true. Are you surprised? The Aztec gods are some mean fellers. Most of them are war or death Gods!

Yes, I believe many of these treasures are cursed, in some way. I love archeology, but personally, I wouldn't like to be the one to take many of these artifacts.



posted on Jan, 11 2004 @ 01:55 AM
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There is a legend in Colombia called El Dorado, which is supposedly cursed.
They also say that it really never existed, but you know how that goes with lost cities.

here is a link

www.humanities-interactive.org...



posted on Jan, 12 2004 @ 06:06 PM
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well I'm a believer, I think that there is so little we know these days about spiritual things, a long time ago, people were more into the spiritual side and practiced it a lot more, and I think that they were able to "tap" into things, so yep I would say I believed, but that's just my opinion, and it may just be beleiving in these things that when things happen we turn to curses and such.



posted on Jan, 12 2004 @ 06:29 PM
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Both Joseph Smith and his father were involved in the occult practice known as "money digging." This involved special rituals and ceremonies which were performed for the purpose of obtaining buried treasure thought to be guarded by evil spirits. Accounts of money digging during the late 1700s and early 1800s are documented in Alan Taylor's article "Treasure Seeking in the American Northeast, 1780-1830", published in American Quarterly, 38 [Spring 1986], pp. 6-34. This article specifically mentions Joseph Smith, Sr., and Jr., on pages 10-12, giving examples of their money digging activities. LDS seminary teacher Grant Palmer also documents the Smith family's occult beliefs and practices, as well as those of their close associates, in his book An Insider's View of Mormon Origins, (SLC, Signature Books, 2002, pp. 175-195).

www.irr.org...

www.realmormonhistory.com...

[Edited on 12-1-2004 by fortean]



posted on Jan, 12 2004 @ 06:34 PM
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Originally posted by fortean

Both Joseph Smith and his father were involved in the occult practice known as "money digging." This involved special rituals and ceremonies which were performed for the purpose of obtaining buried treasure thought to be guarded by evil spirits. Accounts of money digging during the late 1700s and early 1800s are documented in Alan Taylor's article "Treasure Seeking in the American Northeast, 1780-1830", published in American Quarterly, 38 [Spring 1986], pp. 6-34. This article specifically mentions Joseph Smith, Sr., and Jr., on pages 10-12, giving examples of their money digging activities. LDS seminary teacher Grant Palmer also documents the Smith family's occult beliefs and practices, as well as those of their close associates, in his book An Insider's View of Mormon Origins, (SLC, Signature Books, 2002, pp. 175-195).

www.irr.org...

www.realmormonhistory.com...

[Edited on 12-1-2004 by fortean]


Do a search for the "LOST RHOADS MINE" This was a major source of gold for the Mormon church.



posted on Jan, 13 2004 @ 05:02 PM
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Evil Spirits do gaurd some types of treasure!!!


www.otherplane.com...



posted on Jan, 13 2004 @ 05:40 PM
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But, with this lovley spell they should be no problem.

www.sacred-texts.com...



posted on Jan, 14 2004 @ 08:01 AM
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I have had an ongoing interest in the John Swift silver mine famed to be somewhere in the area in which I live. Not having any significant geologic sources of silver deposits, I'm inclined to think it was a smuggling operation. However, Smith was reprted to have killed two Indian Guides before leaving the mine the last time. After that he was struck blind and could never locate it again. His diaries have been handed down with everyone making their little alterations until its not now known what is original and what is not. The curse is supposed to keep the mine and its two guardians hidden and has done so for over one hundered years.



posted on Oct, 20 2011 @ 11:26 PM
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reply to post by DaRAGE
 


No curses, just bad freaking luck! Thomas Rhoads and Brigham Young applied for and got a sizable land grant just outside of Kamas, between what is now the Uintah National Forest and the Uintah-Ouray Indian Reservation. However, the following tidbit of information leads me to believe the mine is not within the boundaries of the land grant. Rhoads had a long and happy understanding with the Ute indians. According to the family's account of things, Thomas visited the mines alone, and was allowed to remove all the gold he could carry. It is rumored on his first trip to the mine ( a fourteen-day round trip) he pocketed 61 lbs. of gold. The keyword here is alone. There was no mincing of words when it came to this rule. Thomas might not die, but any tagalongs were toasted by the indians.

Later, Thomas introduced his son Caleb to "Tabby", the Ute Chief, and gained permission for his son to work the mine in his stead. Relations fell apart between everyone, when the Utes started taking livestock after an expecially hard winter. By 1861, Brigham Young actually asked Abraham Lincoln for, and got, US Army assistance to push the Ute indians back to what is now the existing border of the Uintah-Ouray Indian Reservation. Chief Tabby personally broke off relations with the Rhoads. Now, it seems to me, if any white man of the time were told to not work a mine, not on indian land, he would have laughed his butt off as he broke out his mining equipment. This did not happen. Why? Because the mine is still within the boudaries of the Reservation, but close enough to ride there, bag sixty-plus pounds of gold, and ride back in two weeks. On horseback, no less.



posted on Oct, 23 2011 @ 07:06 AM
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Originally posted by DaRAGE
big curses were with the egyptian things that they have found.. Somethinglike 7 people who found something or reather in some ancient egyption tomb which said if opened a curse woul dbe on them and they would die relatively soon...all died relatively soon afterwards in diferent ways.
Didnt they die of some sort of radiation poisoning? or a certian bacteria in the tomb



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