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Max Water cranks moisture out of thin air

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posted on Jul, 12 2007 @ 04:42 PM
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With glaciers melting, snowfall in the mountains getting slimmer, and lakes drying up and disappearing all over the world, an invention like this could be a Godsend for thrid world nations, as well as areas around the world that struggle to find potable water for their parched populus.

What is even more exciting is the fact that a contaption such as this could be adapted for household use. There is so much water all around us, but until this we just didnt know how to harness it.

I remeber seeing something similar to this in PopSci a while back, but it was being developed by MIT. It looks like it may finally be coming to fruition. Cross your fingers...


There's a lot of water floating around in the air everywhere, and inventor Max Whisson has figured out a way to extract it using Max Water, a wind-powered contraption he named after himself. Max Water uses the concept of condensation, where lower temperature allows less water to hang around in the air, and Whisson says that will amount to 10,000 liters per day dripping from this single rooftop device. Man, that's a lot of water.

Those interested in this device better be mighty thirsty, though, because they'll have to shell out $43,000 for one of these babies. But if you've ever been in a region where there's no water, spending $43K is a whole lot better than dying of thirst. If this idea really works as well as its inventor says it does, economies of scale will make that high price a temporary hurdle.


Max Water to Quench Global Thirst







posted on Jul, 12 2007 @ 04:44 PM
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"Luke, have you collected the moisture from the vaporators?"



posted on Jul, 12 2007 @ 05:23 PM
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I started a thread on this a while ago and you can read more details about his 'water making windmill' here in the original thread... Water from wind

It is quite an ingenious design that requires no power other than a bit of wind. It can even pull water out of the air in arid deserts.



posted on Jul, 13 2007 @ 02:24 AM
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I have to cite chaos theory insofar as this could cause large scale weather anomalies, especially in areas which are already under a drought. Think about it, you pull enough water vapor out of the air... no rain.



posted on Jul, 13 2007 @ 08:19 AM
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i think this is a really great idea and invention and we should take it much further
by mass producing it so that it will cost the same or even less then a domestic fridge....

and we need to get the government involved as due to it's self powering design this could be put in every house all over the woprld...


just think...

pure water.

and it could turn deserts green if these device could be used in remote areas
far from rivers....

we need more people like him.

we should support him...try to get government funding...

also stage a publicity stunt in a city square to get this support...

so many millionaires and billionaires out there who clutch the cash to their chest til the last dying breath...


i just had an idea while i was writing this....i will explain in a new post....

it's a much lower solid state cost idea for producing water from air.


[edit on 13-7-2007 by esecallum]



posted on Jul, 13 2007 @ 09:41 AM
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I've got serious reservations about the numbers cited in the article.

Suppose the thing has a 5 x 5 ft. intake; that's 25 square feet.

I live in one of the windier places in north america; but when you average out the airspeed, it comes to less than 12 miles per hour averaged annually. 12 mph x 5280 ft ( 1 mile ) = 63,360 x 25 sq. ft. for the aperature = 1,584,000 cubic feet an hour.

24 hrs in a day, times 1,584,000 = 3,8016,000 cubic ft.

That may sound like an awful lot, but at "10,000 litres a day," that works out to 0.38 liters of water removed from every cubic foot of air! This works out to 13.42 liters of water per cubic meter!

Where I live, the air is extremely dry, and often the humidity never gets above 40%, even when a thunderhead is dropping rain directly overhead.


The table given at the world water rescue foundation shows "30 grams of water per cubic meter of air" at sea level and 30 C/ 86 F.

In summary, the "10,000 liters per day" figure is off by a factor of 400 !

I'm sure that Whisson was talking about a city or a neighborhood or something, and not an individual unit. The article must be misquoting him.



[edit on 13-7-2007 by dr_strangecraft]



posted on Jul, 16 2007 @ 05:55 AM
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Originally posted by dr_strangecraft

In summary, the "10,000 liters per day" figure is off by a factor of 400 !

I'm sure that Whisson was talking about a city or a neighborhood or something, and not an individual unit. The article must be misquoting him.



[edit on 13-7-2007 by dr_strangecraft]



your figures seem correct in which case it's really 25 litres per day.
which is adequate for daily use but at $43000 is too expensive unless it can be brought downto about $200.

i suggest people try to replicate this with parts from old fridges ...
what do you think?



posted on Jul, 16 2007 @ 11:53 PM
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In the Big Brother house here in Australia this year, they had like a water dispenser that extracted the water from the air. It was just like one of those normal water dispensers with the tap and the bottle of water on top except it had no bottle on top. They would go over to it and fill up bottles from the tap on it.



posted on Jul, 16 2007 @ 11:56 PM
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Originally posted by esecallum

Originally posted by dr_strangecraft

In summary, the "10,000 liters per day" figure is off by a factor of 400 !

I'm sure that Whisson was talking about a city or a neighborhood or something, and not an individual unit. The article must be misquoting him.



[edit on 13-7-2007 by dr_strangecraft]



your figures seem correct in which case it's really 25 litres per day.
which is adequate for daily use but at $43000 is too expensive unless it can be brought downto about $200.

i suggest people try to replicate this with parts from old fridges ...
what do you think?


Dude. You can buy a home dehumidifier for about two hundred dollars. Stick it outside and run it on constant. Hope for the best, which probably wont be much if it's dry outside.



posted on Jul, 17 2007 @ 04:53 AM
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Originally posted by forsakenwayfarer

your figures seem correct in which case it's really 25 litres per day.
which is adequate for daily use but at $43000 is too expensive unless it can be brought downto about $200.

i suggest people try to replicate this with parts from old fridges ...
what do you think?


Dude. You can buy a home dehumidifier for about two hundred dollars. Stick it outside and run it on constant. Hope for the best, which probably wont be much if it's dry outside.

this device does not use electricity but wind to power it...

u have missed the point...

i suggest you leave the fridge door open with icebox open and a fan to blow air into the ice box...to get some figures..

first remove al lthe previous ice....


can u post the big brother machine pictures?



posted on Jul, 20 2007 @ 07:39 AM
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Cooking and drinking water will simply be pulled out of thin air – literally! Atmospheric air-water purifiers will extract moisture directly out of the air providing a very clean source of water for drinking and cooking.


Link.

Couldn't find any specific pics of it from a quick search but i will continue looking.



posted on Jul, 20 2007 @ 09:48 PM
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Nothing new... Hyflux has been selling a water dispenser, taken from thin air, even filtered and ultra violet it... for 5 years now.

Make a bigger version, add a wind vane for power, and I believe it can do the same thing.



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