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Cosmic Radiation and Civilian Airlines.

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posted on Jul, 9 2007 @ 08:19 AM
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Can anyone tell me whether Civil Airliners routinely carry equipment that warns of dangerous levels of Cosmic radiation? I know that the dangers of this radiation increase at high altitudes and that the cumulative effects of regular air travel at high altitudes could be a health risk. I am trying to find a study conducted by SAS (Scandinavian Air Services) in the fifties on this subject but I would be grateful if anyone knows of any more recent research.




posted on Jul, 9 2007 @ 01:07 PM
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In recent years, I have read a few articles about this subject. There have been studies of the levels of cosmic radiation experienced by commercial passenger and cargo arcraft crews and passengers.

I never thought about it until a chance event that occurred while I was flying from Albuquerque to Burbank on Southwest Airlines. We were cruising at about 30,000 feet and I happened to have a ratemeter (Geiger-Mueller counter) with me. When I turned it on to test the batteries, I was surprised to see the needle peg on the lowest scale. It took a moment to recognize the cause.



posted on Jul, 9 2007 @ 02:40 PM
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Interestingly enough I was just reading about the Concorde yesterday, which happened to carry such equipment. Since they regularly cruised at 60,000 feet, exposure to cosmic radiation was a very real possibility, and when it did happen, the cruising altitude would be lowered to around 47,000 feet.


Here is some more information.


In flight exposure will depend on the route, altitude and aircraft type. However, on average, dose rates received will be in the order of:
Concorde, 12-15 µSv (microsieverts) per hour;
Long haul aircraft, 5 µSv (microsieverts) per hour;
Short haul aircraft, 1-3 µSv (microsieverts) per hour dependent on the altitude reached.

British Airways



posted on Jul, 9 2007 @ 02:51 PM
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Originally posted by Shadowhawk
In recent years, I have read a few articles about this subject. There have been studies of the levels of cosmic radiation experienced by commercial passenger and cargo arcraft crews and passengers.

I never thought about it until a chance event that occurred while I was flying from Albuquerque to Burbank on Southwest Airlines. We were cruising at about 30,000 feet and I happened to have a ratemeter (Geiger-Mueller counter) with me. When I turned it on to test the batteries, I was surprised to see the needle peg on the lowest scale. It took a moment to recognize the cause.


So, at 30,000 feet there was now significant radiation? I'm sorry, what was the cause?



posted on Jul, 9 2007 @ 03:36 PM
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My Geiger counter was picking up the increase in cosmic radiation at 30,000 feet as compared to the considerably lower level measured on the ground. The measurable background radiation increases with altitude as the thinner atmosphere at higher elevations provides less shielding. It would have been interesting to watch the change in radiation levels from takeoff on up to cruising altitude.



posted on Jul, 9 2007 @ 03:52 PM
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Thanks. It was me being thick. Would a similar device be fitted in the cockpit of Airliners?



posted on Jul, 9 2007 @ 03:54 PM
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I doubt the radiation is severe enough to cause any significant long term damage. Even the upper tier of the federal limit for radiation in the US (per year) is not that serious, and airline pilots do not break that limit. Shadowhawk can you remember how many REM your counter was recording?

[edit on 9-7-2007 by WestPoint23]



posted on Jul, 10 2007 @ 12:35 AM
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The low scale on my meter goes to 0.2 MR/Hr. I recall that the needle was pegged, or close to it. I don't remember if I checked the next scale (x10). If I did, I don't remember the reading. I had only turned it on to check the battery.



posted on Jul, 10 2007 @ 02:04 AM
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It could be argued that jet aircraft pilots should fall under some category for those who work around radiation, since the levels that pilots of aircraft that fly at those altitude, they can get a rather high exposure, especially for plane that fly in the 40s and 50s thousands of feet.

Even people who live in the high deserts and mountains areas get substantially more than those who live at sea level.



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