It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Neoton: IBM to shatter Moore’s law with 300GHz Crystal Computer

page: 5
22
<< 2  3  4   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Feb, 12 2009 @ 05:20 AM
link   
reply to post by Malichai
 


Can you say "Crystal Skulls"?

Seriously, look up the history behind the mysterious crystal skulls found, especially the fact that they are made of solid Quartz, and that some believe them to be databases of information stored there by those who visited the Sumerians (and others).




posted on Feb, 12 2009 @ 07:38 AM
link   
My home computer two years ago was over 1200 gigaflops. MEH.



Gigahertz doesn't mean a thing unless you're comparing like archetectures. The 300ghz processor isn't 100 times faster than a 3ghz processor, LMAO; like the Pentium 4 it would be a markettors dream. My videocard can do almost two terraflops of Floating Point OPS in shader domain alone, at 'only' 1.5ghz.


[edit on 12/2/2009 by C0bzz]



posted on Mar, 16 2010 @ 08:11 PM
link   
So what ever happened to the IBM Neoton chip???

Isn't it suspicious that somethign so revolutionary vanishes?



posted on Mar, 17 2010 @ 12:00 AM
link   
reply to post by DJM8507
 


Nothing suspicious about gradoise claims that don't measure up.

Although I will add that I have proof that the same people were working on the problem as of March 2009 so its not like it just disappeared.

absimage.aps.org...

[edit on 17-3-2010 by garritynet]

[edit on 17-3-2010 by garritynet]



posted on Mar, 17 2010 @ 03:43 AM
link   
If something like this crystal computer would become commercial on a smaller 'consumer friendly' version, imagine what types of clarity we could get from photos or videos? They would be unparallel to todays standards. It be pretty amazing.

Im sure that in time we will get there though. I mean you dont really think back in the day they made 2ghz processors, then 2.4ghz that they couldnt just go to 3 or 3.5ghz, do you? No, because theyd lose to much money. So they make small advancements for the money...all about the money!!


Either way, Id like to run Halo 6 or MW5 on that new IBM computer...hahaha



posted on Mar, 17 2010 @ 03:59 AM
link   

Originally posted by DJM8507
So what ever happened to the IBM Neoton chip???

Isn't it suspicious that somethign so revolutionary vanishes?


All the claims of reverse engineered alien technology are so laughable at the surface because the technology seems to have progressed so naturally. If they had actually rolled this thing out in 2009 like they planned, it would have been a true leap in technology that the "reverse alien engineering" fanatics could latch onto, and it might have been the first one that had the slightest shred of plausibility due to the size of the technological jump.

But as engineers know all too well, implementing a reliable version of a new technology can be fraught with complications. So no, it doesn't seem suspicious to me but that's because I've seen firsthand the real life engineering snags that new technologies can hit when we try to implement them. And this technological leap in particular is so vast that the opportunity for implementation "snags" is also vast.

I searched IBM's website for this and got zero hits there, no updates or anything.

So, maybe Moore's law is intact after all? (For the time being at least).



posted on Mar, 19 2010 @ 10:58 AM
link   

Originally posted by Arbitrageur

But as engineers know all too well, implementing a reliable version of a new technology can be fraught with complications. So no, it doesn't seem suspicious to me but that's because I've seen firsthand the real life engineering snags that new technologies can hit when we try to implement them. And this technological leap in particular is so vast that the opportunity for implementation "snags" is also vast.

I searched IBM's website for this and got zero hits there, no updates or anything.

So, maybe Moore's law is intact after all? (For the time being at least).


So are you saying that perhaps in the real world, they could not produce a reliable version that was cost effective and due to this all research was halted?

I just find it interesting that there are no longer any mentions of this on their website, and very few references on the entire internet.

Is it not plausible to think that perhaps it was snapped up by the Government? or some other large corporate entity?



posted on Mar, 19 2010 @ 11:08 AM
link   
reply to post by DJM8507
 


If you announced something groundbreaking and revolutionary, and then completely failed to deliver a working model even close to what you announced, you'd cover up the embarrassment and hope everyone forgot too



posted on Mar, 19 2010 @ 11:21 AM
link   

Originally posted by DJM8507
So are you saying that perhaps in the real world, they could not produce a reliable version that was cost effective and due to this all research was halted?


I think they got some results in the lab, but it's a big leap to take some experimental lab results and put them into production, it could take a decade or more to develop reliable manufacturing techniques and products for something like this.


Originally posted by D.E.M.
If you announced something groundbreaking and revolutionary, and then completely failed to deliver a working model even close to what you announced, you'd cover up the embarrassment and hope everyone forgot too


While we don't have enough facts to know what happened, if we want to speculate, I think this is pretty good speculation. I'm even reminded of the Fleischmann and Pons experiment which yielded positive results on cold fusion in the lab, and how many decades later are we still trying to figure out if that's possibly a viable technology?

Yes, a lab result doesn't always mean you have something that can lead to real world mass production.

Some labs are still working on cold fusion, and IBM may not have given up on this technology but have decided to keep quiet about it for now, I wouldn't be too surprised to see it pop back up 10 years from now as a working model after they work all the bugs out, (well maybe a little surprised
but pleasantly so).

[edit on 19-3-2010 by Arbitrageur]



posted on Mar, 19 2010 @ 11:33 AM
link   

Originally posted by uberarcanist
I still foresee games and other apps that utilize this technology, but it will probably be about two years after release before they are there.


I had to chuckle to myself on this one...

I consider myself lucky I’m 36 and have had the good fortune of growing up with the start of the information revolution right from the start of home computing..

One incident I remember clearly was owning a copy of 'Wing Commander' on my old trust 386 running at 16mhz. The graphics were awesome and smooth for the time, I had a nice flight stick and enjoyed playing it.

Then my dad bought the family a new super 486 dx2 66. Effectively 2 x 33mhz...

Wooow I thought super VGA!!!

Then I tried Wing Comanda fully expecting to find it smoother with better resolution...

What did I find??

it was unplayable... the game ran so damn fast the game was over before I even had chance to do anything, the game you see was written to run at 16mhz....


My point is this. Its not how fast or what spec of machine you have its how well put together the software is.

Do you know that even today if you are not tech savy and know how to manage multi-core proccesing your quad core machine is 90% of the time using just one or two cores?? the other two cores lay dormant because the software hasn't been written to utilise them!!


Anyway, this technology will more than likely be used for other applications not for standard desktop pc's, at least for the foreseeable.

All the best,

Korg.



posted on Mar, 19 2010 @ 12:02 PM
link   
reply to post by Malichai
 



It is known as the Crystal Computer and it is a way to use pulses of light to transfer and store digital information as quantum bits


Crystal based computers were first mentioned in the Montauk stories, and those were all set aside as myths....or were they? This is alien technology here, don't be fooled into thinking IBM invented this.

CRYSTALS

Development in Advanced Computing Technologies



posted on Mar, 19 2010 @ 12:03 PM
link   
Probably will be to expensive for the average people or never hit the market. Theres no money made from it if you don't have to buy new hardware every year to keep up with the more demanding games ect.

But they will use it to crack encryptions, no more hiding anything for the average joe.

Really a shame how much further we could be if there was no greed/money involved



posted on Sep, 27 2010 @ 08:17 PM
link   
I wonder if the latest news on a new "light chip" is a derivative of this technology that vanished for a while.

www.ft.com...

Interesting to say the least.



posted on Sep, 27 2010 @ 08:47 PM
link   
NSA has plenty of super computers.




As of November 2009
Important Topic Updates
, the largest computer system Cray has delivered is the XT5 system at National Center for Computational Sciences at Oak Ridge National Laboratories.[5] This system, with over 224,000 processing cores, is dubbed "Jaguar" and is the fastest computer in the world as measured by the LINPACK benchmark[6] at the speed of 1.75 petaflops.[7] It is the fastest system available for open science and the first system to exceed a sustained performance of 1 petaflops on a 64-bit scientific application.




The world’s fastest computer remains the Cray Jaguar supercomputer at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. In November it was measured at 1.75 petaflops.

In the previous year’s ranking, the Chinese had the fifth-fastest computer, a system that was based at a National Supercomputing Center in Tianjin. That machine has dropped to seventh place.

The US continues to be the dominant maker of supercomputers, and is the nation with the most machines in the top 500. The US has 282 of the world’s fastest 500 computers on the new list, an increase from 277 when the rankings were compiled in November and 55.4 percent of installed performance.

Boosted by Nebulae’s performance, China rose to No. 2 overall, with 24 of the systems on the list and 9.2 percent of global supercomputing capacity, up from 21 systems six months ago.

Europe had 144 systems on the list, including 38 in Britain, 29 in France and 24 in Germany. Japan had 18 supercomputers on the list, up from 16 six months ago, and India had five.

The Nebulae reflects China’s continued reliance on foreign know-how. It was built by Dawning Information Industry but uses processors from Intel and Nvidia.

China, however, appears intent on challenging US dominance.
.


www.taipeitimes.com...


edit on 27-9-2010 by JBA2848 because: (no reason given)
extra DIV



posted on Sep, 27 2010 @ 08:59 PM
link   
yes, one day processing power will be enough to process a copy of our own universe

than what?


people will start new religions



posted on Sep, 27 2010 @ 09:05 PM
link   
I've heard that the first game thats going to be released for this is "Duke Nukem Forver!!!!!!"

Can't wait!




edit on 27-9-2010 by davespanners because: (no reason given)



new topics

top topics


active topics

 
22
<< 2  3  4   >>

log in

join